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Porsche Cayman 987: Buying guide and review (2005-2012)

Porsche Cayman 987: Buying guide and review (2005-2012) Classic and Performance Car
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For years, Porsche 911 fans claimed that there would only ever be one true Porsche sports coupe. First came the Porsche 928, more of a GT than an all-out sports car, and the 911 remained king. The 944 and 968 models were certainly sporty, but no match for the rear-engined and much more powerful 911s. Head down a twisty road in a Cayman however, and you might just change your tune. 
 
Released in 2005 in top of the range S form, the Cayman was much more than just a hardtop Boxster. It may have shared a lot of componentry with its stablemate, but its increased rigidity and sportier set-up gave the new coupe a very definite edge. 
 
Now in its second generation, the Cayman range has developed a loyal following thanks to its excellent handling, precise steering and everyday usability. The good ones have started to firm up in value so now seems like a good time to delve into what it takes to get a great used one. 
 

Which Cayman to buy?

 
The 3.4-litre 295bhp Cayman S arrived first, joined the following year by the base 245bhp 2.7-litre Cayman. The less powerful car had a five-speed ‘box as standard, but the six-speed manual from the S or a five-speed Tiptronic could be optioned. The limited edition Cayman S Sport was launched in 2008 and featured 303bhp, PASM, a sports exhaust and some individual touches to differentiate it from the rest of the range. 
 
The mid-life face-lift came in 2009 and some welcome changes were made across the range. The engines were upgraded, both losing the troublesome RMS seals, the S cars gained direct fuel injection along with 25bhp while the non-S models got a 200cc increase and an additional 20bhp. The PDK double clutch transmission replaced the ageing Tiptronic gearbox, the five-speed ‘box was dropped and visually, LED lighting and revised wheels and colour palettes were offered.
 
Standard equipment was not exactly generous, but in truth, there were few extras that significantly improved the driving experience. Worthwhile options to look out for are PASM (active suspension management) which improves the ride, especially on 19 inch wheels, the sports exhaust system and the LSD which could be optioned on the last Gen II cars. While the early Tiptronic boxes work well enough, the PDK is a far greater setup. It’s of course the manuals that most people went for when new, and the one you will want for the more engaging experience. 
 
For the ultimate Gen 2 Cayman, the R is the one you will want. With 330bhp and a limited slip diff, it was the default choice in its segment – eclipsing a base 911 around a track too. 
 
As a daily driver the sweet spot in the range has to be the Gen 2 base model 2.9 Cayman. Well balanced and with enough power to put a smile on your face, this mid-engined sports car is about as good as it gets. The lower levels of grip and more pliant suspension are better suited to bumpy UK roads too.
 

Performance and specs

 
Gen II Porsche Cayman S
Engine 3436cc, 24 valve Boxer-six 
Power 321bhp @ 7400rpm 
Torque 273lb.ft @ 4500-5800rpm
Top speed 180mph 
0-62mph 5.0seconds 
Fuel consumption 32.1mpg 
Gearbox Six-speed manual
 

Dimensions and weight

 
Wheelbase 2475mm
Length 4380mm
Width 1801mm
Height 1295mm
Weight 1320kg
 

Common problems

 
Pre-2009 Caymans, as well as any Porsche using the same block (First two generations of Boxster and first two generations of water cooled 911) are all susceptible to IMS bearing failure, bore scoring or rear main seal leakage. Many cars have gone on to cover 200,000 miles without any issues while a handful have failed far sooner than that. Keep calm, arm yourself with knowledge, and remember that the percentage of cars affected is very low:

• A noisy idle can indicate an impending Intermediate Shaft (IMS) bearing failure. Check for evidence of previous engine rebuilds or repairs.
 
• Excessive smoke on a cold start and/or high oil consumption may mean that the cylinder bores are scored. Check for an oily exhaust pipe. If unsure a bore scope should be used to check the condition of the cylinder walls.
 
• Less of an issue are the Rear Main Seals (RMS) which tend to leak a little just to let you know there is still oil in the engine. These can be replaced at the next service but heavy leaking should be checked sooner.
 
• With all the above issues, the services of a Porsche specialist can be invaluable in providing peace of mind before a purchase.
 
• While the engines are strong (aside from the points listed above) Gen I cars may develop cylinder head warping if tracked regularly, Gen II cars had four oil pickups (up from two) alleviating the problem. Whether driven hard or gently, changing the oil frequently is highly recommended.
 
• Specialists can check the ECU to see whether a car has been over-revved, warped discs and non-Porsche specification tyres may also indicate neglect.
 
• The Gen I cars can suffer from premature front suspension wear and corrosion of the exhaust mountings. Check for knocks and rattles when on the test drive.
 
• Multiple owners and low mileages may mean lots of cold starts and short trips so don’t be put off by higher mileage examples.
 
• Cooling systems can develop leaks from road debris damaging the front mounted radiator.
 

Model history

 
2005: Porsche Cayman S launched featuring 295bhp 3.4-litre boxer motor. Six-speed manual and five-speed Tiptronic gearboxes available
2006: 245bhp 2.7-litre Cayman launched
2008: Cayman S Sport edition introduced, power up to 303bhp, sports exhaust and PASM standard – 700 built
2009: Mid-life face-lift on all models, 7-speed PDK gearbox replaces Tiptronic unit. PCM (Porsche Communication Management) is upgraded offering touchscreen operation. Cayman S get power upgrade to 320bhp. Base Cayman receives new DFI 2.9l engine pushing power up to 265bhp
2011: Cayman S Black Edition with bespoke trim and lightweight Cayman R with 330bhp and LSD introduced
2012: 981 Cayman launched in late 2012 phasing out the 987 Cayman
 

Owners clubs, forums and websites

 
• www.porscheclubgb.com – UK Porsche Club
• www.caymanoc.com – Cayman owners club
• www.rennlist.com – Porsche Forum
 

Summary and prices

 
A high-mileage pre-facelift 2006 2.7-litre Cayman starts at £12,000 while an ’05 3.4S is not much more and provides a significant performance boost. Avoid ultra-low mileage multiple owner cars, and sketchy service histories.

The Gen II 2.9-litre Cayman can be found from £18,000 and is a well-balanced choice. At the other end of the scale the 911 baiting Cayman R starts at £40,000 and Gen II S models can be found from £24,000. The capabilities of the Cayman are aptly demonstrated by how fastidious Porsche were in stopping it from eclipsing the 911, get one now while they are still underrated and undervalued.
 
Words: John Tallodi
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Last updated: 14th Oct 2016
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    6 Speed Manual Gearbox Black Black Leather Porsche PCM 3.0 Touchscreen Satnav With Universal Audio Interface & Bluetooth Phone Connectivity 19 Inch Boxster Syder Alloys Finished In Exterior Body With Colour Crested Centres Heated Seats PDLS Dynamic Xenon Lights With Wash And Cornering Function Auto Dimming Exterior And Interior Mirrors Rain Sensing Wipers HiFi Package Plus Design Package Comfprt Package Porsche Crest Embossed Storage Bin Black Sports Tailpipes Crest Embossed Headrests Piano Black Interior Inlays Red Rear Light Lens Uprgade Fully Automatic Climate Control Aircondioning 3 Spoke Steering Wheel In Smooth Leather PSM Porsche Stability Management Onboard Computer Windscreen Toptint Full Porsche Main Agent Service History Supplied with a Independent mechanical multipoint check & 2 years comprehensive parts and labour warranty. 12 Months MOT A thorough independent multipoint mechanical inspection and rectification of faults found carried out by a renowned Porsche specialist. HPI clear and national mileage register check with certificate At least 6 months or 6000 miles away from the next service All tyres have the correct speed & N rating and a minimum of double the legal t

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    • Mileage: 28000 mi
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