loading Loading please wait....

Porsche Boxster Spyder: The Next Big Thing

Lightweight Porsche Boxster Spyder has both luxury and rarity on its side

As most of us stand and watch the values of blue-chip classics soar far beyond the meagre budget of the common man, it would be nice to think we were learning something. And, while there’s no infallible formula for what makes a motor rise in value, it seems that those which look good, go well, have a prestigious name on the back and were made in small numbers are the most likely to appreciate.

So where does that leave the Porsche Boxster Spyder? In a pretty good position to become tomorrow’s classic, I reckon. As the long-standing owner of an air-cooled 911, I never had much time for the Boxster – until the summer of 2010, when I drove the then-new Spyder for the first time.

A world apart from the anniversary Spyder makeovers of 2004 and 2007, those made towards the end of 987 production were significantly different from the standard car. Sitting a good inch lower, the Spyder was 80kg lighter with aluminium doors, carbon-backed seats and the lightest alloys Porsche had ever made. Another 3kg was saved by the aluminium ‘double bubble’ rear deck, with just 11kg being added by the famously fiddly rag-top and frame.

The lack of weight, combined with the 316bhp engine from the Cayman S, made for a thrilling package which, when combined to the model’s low-volume production, meant the Boxster Spyder had (and has) ‘future classic’ written all over it. No one seems to know just how many were made, but the received wisdom puts the number at fewer than 2000, with most going to the US.

Andy Page of Dick Lovett Porsche in Cardiff reckons there are only around 200 in the UK, and now that more of us are beginning to realise what a great car we missed, he believes values could be on the rise.

‘When the car was new, many people were put off by the manual roof and the general minimalism,’ he says. ‘But the Spyder was the best-driving Boxster ever made and is now finding a firm following.’ The next big thing? I’d put money on it.

Or consider…

Lotus Elise SC - The most powerful Elise available (218bhp) when it launched in 2008, but the extra cost kept sales low. The green and yellow Jim Clark special edition looks good.

Vauxhall VX220 Turbo - A relatively rare sight on the roads, but plenty available for sale – and far cheaper than the Boxster Spyder. Which is probably because it’s a Vauxhall, not a Porsche.

Audi TT Sport - With no rear seats, no parcel shelf and a few other mods, it lost 75kg and had an uprated 237bhp engine.

Words: Simon de Burton/evo Magazine

Porsche Boxster Classifieds

more on this car

Related content