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Packard
0 1800000 GBP
  • 1931 Packard 845 Deluxe Eight Coupe Roadster

    $249,500(£0) $249,500(£0)

    The Packard 8th Series made its debut on August 14, 1931 at a time when the automaker was beginning to face serious competition from its cross-town rivals at Cadillac. While Packard had remained sales leader through 1930, Cadillac’s twelve and sixteen cylinder engines as well as the value LaSalle brand began to pose a serious threat. But Packard soldiered on, and with the 8th series, they continued their traditional approach with impeccably built, beautifully styled automobiles with an unerring sense of quality. The practice of offering buyers standard and semi-custom bodies continued, with fabulous styles by the likes of LeBaron, Rollston, Dietrich and Derham gracing the flagship 145-inch Deluxe Eight chassis. Of the variety of body styles and configurations available, it is the elegant convertible coupe by LeBaron that stood out among the most attractive and desirable. It boasted distinctive lines, including a wide beltline molding, attractively sloping doors, elegantly sloping rear deck, and a distinctive convertible top that folded flush with the body, for a clean smooth line all the way through the car. The design was so attractive that it would later be borrowed by Packard, almost point-for-point, to become the factory’s production coupe roadster body of 1932–1934. Only three such LeBaron-bodied Deluxe Eight Convertible Coupes are known to survive today. Our featured example, riding on the 145-inch wheelbase chassis, presents in handsome condition, wearing an older but high quality restoration and benefitting from some recent freshening. The firewall plate identifies the car as having been delivered new on February 10, 1931 by the legendary Earle C. Anthony Packard dealership in Oakland, California. An unusual and rarely seen secondary tag denotes the car was resold as a “Used Packard” via a Chicago dealer on March 14, 1933, indicating the car had relocated to the Midwest early in its life. Further investigation of the component numbers on the engine, frame and steering box reveals them to be in very close sequence, indicating they are original to this particular car. Its early life is as-yet unknown, but this fabulous Packard surfaced in the 1950s, as an excellent original car, when it became part of the well-known enthusiast Wayne Merriman’s collection. Merriman sold the car in the 1960s to the former Classic Car Club of America President Gene Perkins of Indiana. Mr. Perkins had the car restored by a friend, though it was reportedly in very good order to begin with. He kept the car for many years, and during his tenure, it was featured in Hugo Pfau’s book, The Coach-Built Packard. Today, this fine Packard presents in lovely condition throughout. It retains its original body, which is finished in a unique creamy tan color with medium tan body lines. The feature lines subtly outline the body sides, with the arrow-like speedform at the leading edge of the bonnet lending a sensation of motion even while sitting still. It is a subdued but very attractive color combination, with the bright red wire wheels and blackwall tires giving the car a sporty and purposeful appearance. The distinctive body is fitted with a trunk, rather than a typical rumble seat, which is believed to be a unique feature of this example. A trunk rack provides room for additional carrying capacity, allowing copious luggage space for long-distance touring. Dual side mount spares wear body-colored covers with lovely chrome tops. Dual, steerable Pilot Ray driving lamps, a Goddess of Speed mascot, radiator stone guard, and freshly re-chromed bumpers add some additional flash without taking away from the stunning LeBaron lines. A true two-seat Packard roadster, the cozy cabin is trimmed in tan leather with complementing door panels and dark brown carpets. Upholstery quality is very good, showing light signs of use, but generally good and tidy and appearing well kept since the restoration was completed. The wood-grained dash panel is fitted with original instruments and Jaeger clock as well as a rare Earl C. Anthony service plaque. Packard’s 385 Cubic Inch inline-eight cylinder engine is well-presented, showing signs of use but remaining in good, tidy order with correct Packard Green paint and black porcelain manifolds. The 8th series engine featured some of the improvements made for the 745 Speedster, and produced a healthy 120 horsepower. This car runs and drives very well, having benefitted from fettling by the experts at Stone Barn Restorations in 2016. This beautiful LeBaron creation served as the prototype for 1932-1934 Packard Coupe Roadsters, and it remains a very important design in Packard history. Its significance hasn’t gone unnoticed, having been enjoyed by well-known connoisseurs of the marque. It presents today in handsome condition, an ideal choice for CCCA CARavan Touring or casual show.  

    For sale
    $249,500(£0) $249,500(£0)
    Hyman Ltd
    314-524-6000 View contact number
  • 1932 Packard 904 Dietrich Sport Phaeton

    $1,450,000(£0) $1,450,000(£0)

    In 1932, while facing America’s worsening economic depression, luxury car builders seemingly put their heads down and produce ever more luxurious machines at the top of their ranges. But companies like Packard knew they needed large reserves of cash if they were to survive the next few years. One of the strategies employed by Packard to deal with the Great Depression was to consolidate as much of its body construction and trimmings as possible in its own facilities, filling the space that was becoming under-used as production dropped. Factory bodies became ever more popular with buyers, but custom coachbuilding was still far from dead, and Packard was particularly keen on maintaining a strong relationship with Murray Corporation’s affiliate, Dietrich Inc. Raymond Dietrich’s reputation was beyond reproach among stylists of the late 1920s and early 1930s, and his designs provided welcome new ideas and concepts for Packard’s own coachwork. With the 9th series, Dietrich performed some of his best work; beautiful, elegant machines that made the best of Packard’s fabulous new chassis that was larger, more powerful and faster than any standard model that preceded it. In particular, the “Individual Custom by Dietrich” bodies, which were custom tailored for the flagship senior Packard Chassis (9th, 10th and 11th series) truly reflected the masterful talent of Dietrich. Though they could be purchased directly from a Packard dealer, they were hugely expensive, representing the most costly models available aside from true one-off custom coachwork. Each body was custom-tailored to the buyer’s wishes and in many ways they were the last truly custom Dietrich bodies, as later production cars wearing the Dietrich name simply borrowed styling cues from earlier Individual Customs.  Even after Dietrich’s ouster from the firm that bore his name, his influence was felt on Packard’s design catalog for many years to come, and Dietrich-bodied Packards continue to draw attention from collectors and enthusiasts for their impeccable, breathtaking style. Our gorgeous featured Packard is a 1932 Eight Deluxe 904 wearing rare and desirable Individual Custom Sport Phaeton coachwork by Dietrich. This fabulous car was sold new on August 18th 1932 by Douglas M. Longyear, Inc., also known as Hollywood Motors, a Packard dealer located just down the road from the Grauman's Chinese Theater. It has been fully restored to concours standards in its fabulous original color scheme of Moss Agate Grey on the body and chassis, with Aztec Olivine Brown feature lines and off-white coach stripes. Fine details include body colored louvers in the radiator grille, and body colored wheel rims contrasting chrome hubs and spokes. The car rides on a set of brand new blackwall tires for an effect that is understated yet quite striking, perfectly suited to Ray Dietrich’s fabulous and sporty styling. As these cars were built to suit for the buyer, it is clear the original owner had quite fine taste. The presentation is fabulous, the car having been treated to a recent full restoration to very high standards of quality. Paintwork, body fitment and detailing are exquisite as one would expect from a concours quality restoration. Chrome plating is beautiful and the body is adorned with a Goddess of Speed mascot, dual sidemount spare wheels with body colored covers, chrome counterweighted bumpers, and an original luggage rack in the rear. The Sport Phaeton body style gives the car a long, low slung and sporting appearance, with its laid-back split windscreen and gracefully sweeping fenders. Rear passengers are kept comfortable thanks to a separate central windscreen with unique, half-moon wind-wings that fold outward. For the full open-air effect, the rear screen can be fully retracted into the back of the front seat. The lush and luxurious cabin is trimmed in light mocha-colored leather front and rear. The seats and carpets appear absolutely fresh with no apparent wear and extremely high quality presentation. Beautiful door panels are covered in matching leather and properly detailed, capped with gorgeous wood trim. The dash houses a beautiful array of factory instruments and controls, all finished to a high standard. As one should expect from such an impeccably prepared Senior Packard of this era, the car is mechanically robust and has been enjoyed for many thousands of miles on tours and events through the years. It remains in fabulous order, with a properly detailed inline-eight cylinder engine and a clean and tidy chassis. The most recent owners have treated the car to a thorough freshening, and it has appeared at events such as the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance and Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. This fabulous Individual Custom Dietrich is presented in attractive colors, is a joy to drive and is virtually concours ready. This is a marvelous opportunity to acquire one of the most stylish and desirable Packards of the Classic Era, fresh from long-term stewardship in a large and important collection.  

    For sale
    $1,450,000(£0) $1,450,000(£0)
  • 1930 Packard 734 Speedster

    $1,800,000(£0) $1,800,000(£0)

    In 1930, Packard took a big leap outside of its traditional comfort zone of luxury and prestige with the introduction of the overtly sporty, driver-focused 734 Speedster. The 734 (7th series, 134” wheelbase) was based on a new, shortened and boxed version of the Standard Eight chassis, which was designed exclusively for this model. Built in Packard’s newly established in-house custom shop, each 734 received a hotter variant of the proven 385 cubic inch straight-eight engine. The engine was upgraded with a newly designed separate intake manifold, oversize updraught Detroit Lubricator carburetor, and a 45-degree mounted, finned exhaust manifold. A larger vacuum booster was added and the engine was mated to a model-specific four-speed gearbox. These additions could push the new 734 to 100mph, so it also featured upgraded brakes with large, finned drums. Contrary to popular belief, the “Speedster” name referred not to the body style, but to the sporting nature of the chassis. The 734 Speedster was actually available in five different custom-catalog body styles: A two-seat boat-tail runabout, four-seat runabout roadster with rumble seat, sport phaeton, Victoria coupe, or sedan. In spite of the exceptional performance and quality, Packard only sold approximately 113 examples of the 734. The marketing team was unsure of what to do with such a high-performance machine, given the majority of Packard clients preferred luxury and silent operation over outright speed. Today, the 734 is one of the most coveted of all Packards, with only a handful of genuine examples surviving, it is considered by many to be the Holy Grail motorcar of the America Classic Era. We are very pleased to offer this magnificent 1930 Packard 734 Speedster Runabout, a fully researched and vetted example with outstanding history and a recent, concours-level restoration. Chassis number 184088, this fabulous machine was delivered new to a Mrs. Sealey from Portland, Oregon. The firewall data plate confirms this information with a stated delivery date of 7-7-30 by Service & Sales, Inc. Portland, Oregon. It isn’t known how long Mrs. Sealey retained her Packard, but it was acquired by William F. Harrah in 1960, and it became part of his famous, world-class collection of motor cars. Mr. Harrah retained this Packard for twenty-six years, this automobile a clear standout in a collection that spanned as many as 1,800 cars. Following its time with Harrah, the car went directly to another important collection, that of General William Lyon. General Lyon was a noted connoisseur of important Packards, and this car was one of the true flagships of his collection. While in his care, the Speedster was kept in exceptional mechanical order by his team of full time mechanics, and it is said that General Lyons enjoyed driving it immensely, calling it “a car for the true enthusiast”. The Speedster left the Lyons Collection in 2011 and while in the hands of its next and most recent owner was treated to a careful, yet comprehensive restoration to the stunning livery you see it today. Since General Lyons’ ownership, it has been carefully inspected by Packard 734 experts and found to be highly correct, still equipped with the original body (No. 442-26), chassis (No. 184088), engine (No. 184095), and other major components. The beautiful maroon coachwork is accented with black feature lines, fenders and chassis. The presentation is exceptional as one would expect from a concours-ready example, with impeccable panel fit, paint finishes, and show-quality chrome plating. Six exquisite new chrome wire wheels were specially built for this car and fitted with blackwall tires to provide the signature sporting character. The top is trimmed in black Haartz canvas, atop a fully restored frame. Side curtains are also included, as is a clear plastic dust cover for the top. Gorgeous, virtually new black leather seats are in beautiful order; staggered in the cockpit to allow the driver room for more spirited driving. Bright red carpets are bound in black enhance the sporty nature of the cabin as well. All detailing and finish work is executed to the highest of standards, worthy of show on the world’s concours circuit. Mechanically, this Packard is fully sorted and well-prepared, with performance to match its exceptional cosmetic quality. It would be equally at home on a tour as it would on the show circuit and is a delight to drive. Comprehensive inspections confirm that it retains the original engine, steering box, frame, and rear axle as well as the correct finned manifolds. The gearbox, a known weak point on these 1930 models, has been replaced with a visually identical four-speed unit from 1931 as it has inherently stronger internals than the earlier units. In fact, of the 19 known 1930 734 Speedsters, only 7 retain their original gearboxes, and this modification is widely accepted in the Packard community, particularly for any car that will be driven and enjoyed as intended. The only other non-original component found was the front axle, though it retains the correct Speedster finned drum brakes. Detailing on the chassis and engine is virtually faultless, as one would expect from a show-ready and lightly driven example. Having had just three owners in 57 years, this is an incredibly rare opportunity to acquire one of just a handful of genuine, verified 734 Speedster Runabouts in existence. It is a stunning motorcar with remarkable history in the hands of world-famous collectors and a restoration that is beyond reproach. Widely considered to be the ultimate Packard, the 734 Speedster Runabout seamlessly combines high style, exquisite quality, and 100mph performance in a timeless, stunningly beautiful package.

    For sale
    $1,800,000(£0) $1,800,000(£0)
  • 1939 Packard Twelve Coupe

    $159,500(£0) $159,500(£0)

    Packard’s legendary twelve-cylinder cars are among of the most desirable and respected of all pre-war American classics. From 1916-1923, the “Twin Six” established Packard’s leadership in the luxury automobile market, and after a hiatus for the model, a new twelve-cylinder Packard returned in 1932 to take on Cadillac’s headline-grabbing V-16, Lincoln’s V-12, and other manufacturers joining the multi-cylinder race. 1939 marked 40 years of Packard production, yet sadly it also marked the final year for Packard V-12 production. In the aftermath of the Great Depression, buyers began to drift away from the large, extravagant custom bodies that dominated the segment for so many years. So when faced with slumping sales and rising costs, the expensive V-12 was dropped with only 446 examples leaving the famous Detroit plant in the final year. As before, the 67-degree V-12 displaced 473 cubic inches and produced a very healthy 175 horsepower, far superior to Lincoln’s output and just ten shy of Cadillac’s mighty V-16. It is often said that the power and sublime smoothness of the Packard V-12 is what inspired Enzo Ferrari to use the same configuration in his cars… an anecdote that may never be proven but is certainly believable once you experience the silken nature of the great Packard engine. For 1939, no fewer than fourteen body styles were offered in the factory catalog, and the chassis offered in two wheelbase lengths, the 1707 (134 inches) and the 1708 (139 inches). Vacuum assisted brakes and even a vacuum assisted clutch made for easy, light operation. So while the Packard Twelve is a big, grand car, it is surprisingly pleasant and hugely enjoyable to drive. This 1939 Packard 1707 Twelve wears handsome and desirable 2/4-Passenger Coupe coachwork from the factory catalog (style number 1238) coming to us most recently from the hands of a long-term owner who has cared for it over the past forty years. The previous owner recalls finding the car through a classified ad in the San Francisco Chronicle in the 1970s, and upon seeing it for the first time, he was surprised to find it remarkably correct, unrestored and unmolested. It had apparently been kept in the seller’s family for many years prior and had clearly been cherished. A deal was done on the spot and the new owner went on enjoy his lovely Packard Twelve for the next four decades. Within the last ten years, a sympathetic, quality restoration was performed by AutoEuropa of California. Finished in Packard Maroon, this lovely coupe still presents today in very good order, with straight, properly aligned panels and high-quality paintwork. The body is beautifully stylish, with full, curvaceous fenders, a swept-back radiator grille and a streamlined profile. No range-topping model would be complete without the right accessories, and this car delivers with its grand Cormorant mascot, dual Trippe Light spot lamps, body-colored steel sidemount covers, and a matching body-colored Packard trunk in the rear. It is also equipped with a rumble seat for two occasional rear passengers as well as a golf-bag door. Exterior brightwork is in very good condition overall. Inside the two-passenger cabin, one finds excellent upholstery in a period appropriate striped-pattern broadcloth. Beautiful wood trim adorns the door caps, and the dash is wood-grained paint on steel as original, with a lineup of clear and well-presented original instruments. Chrome plating on the interior fittings is good, with some appearing in very good original condition. Seats, door panels and other soft trim, such as the gray wool headlining, remain in excellent order, showing the car was used lightly and carefully since its restoration. The same goes with the maroon leather trim on the rumble seat. The engine bay and undercarriage are clean, tidy and very well-presented. While some years have passed since it was restored, this Packard has been lovingly cared for and maintained in fine order. Packard’s final series twelve-cylinder presents in clean and well-detailed condition with correct Packard-green engine paint and black accessories. As a 1939 model, it retains the correct original column-shifted manual transmission, which now sends its power through an updated “high-speed” rear axle, which was a factory option. This very rare, handsome and desirable Packard Coupe has clearly been cherished throughout its life. The attractive, high-quality restoration has only mellowed slightly since completion, and the car has been used for the occasional tour, yet seldom shown. It remains a very fine choice for AACA or CCCA shows, yet is also a wonderful automobile for an enthusiast to enjoy the splendor of a Twelve-Cylinder Packard on CCCA CARavan tours or similar events.

    For sale
    $159,500(£0) $159,500(£0)
  • 1930 Packard 734 Speedster Runabout

    $595,000(£0) $595,000(£0)

    In 1930, Packard took a big step outside of its comfort zone as well as deliberate swing at cross-town rival Cadillac with the introduction of the sporty, driver-focused 734 Speedster. The 734 (7thseries, 134” wheelbase) was based on a new, shortened and strengthened chassis that was designed exclusively for the model. Built in Packard’s new in-house custom shop, each 734 received a revised version of the proven 385 cubic inch straight-eight engine. The engine was upgraded with a newly designed separate intake manifold, oversize updraught carburetor, and a 45-degree mounted, finned exhaust manifold. A larger vacuum booster was added and the engine was mated to a model-specific four-speed gearbox. These additions could push the new 734 to 100mph, so it also featured upgraded brakes with large, finned drums. Contrary to popular belief, the “Speedster” name referred not to the body style, but to the sporting nature of the chassis. The 734 Speedster was actually available in five different custom-catalog body styles: A two-seat boat-tail runabout, four-seat runabout roadster with rumble seat, sport phaeton, Victoria coupe, or sedan. In spite of the exceptional performance and quality, Packard only sold approximately 113 examples of the 734. The marketing team was unsure of what to do with such a high-performance machine, given the majority of Packard clients preferred luxury and silent operation over outright speed. Today, the 734 is one of the most coveted of all Packards, with only a handful of genuine examples surviving, it is considered by many to be the Holy Grail of the America Classic Era. Our featured example, chassis number 184006, has enjoyed a rich history and has recently been part of an important European collection and run regularly in tours and rallies. It is believed that it left the Detroit works with a Victoria body, however that body was removed at some point and replaced with this high-quality and very accurate recreation of the factory 2-seat runabout, but the original correct Speedster pieces are still present, the rear axle, the front axle, the finned manifold, the Speedster carburetor, etc.  The robust nature of Packard construction meant that chassis would occasionally outlive bodies, so rebodies are not uncommon. In the 1962, this car joined the renowned William F. Harrah collection in Reno, Nevada. At some point during the 1960’s or early 1970’s, the Boattail body was built by the renowned Richard Kingston of California Metal Shaping, using an original 734 Speedster Runabout as a guide.  Eventually, the Packard found its way via Hyman Ltd to the collection of its most recent keeper, a passionate and knowledgeable enthusiast who truly enjoys his automobiles as they were intended: On the road. He has reported that since purchasing the car from Hyman Ltd, he has amassed an astounding 30,000km and declared it capable of 130km/h and to be the most sporting car he has owned next to his XK120. It presents in very good condition, a car meant for driving over show, yet still very attractive with good quality finishes and detailing. The two tone paint scheme is well suited to the sporting body, with black fenders and top surfaces accented by rich orange sides and subtle gold coachlines. The orange chassis adds an additional layer to the already attention-grabbing scheme. Paint quality is very good with fine finishing and gloss atop straight and well-aligned panels. The body wears appropriate accessories such as dual Pilot-Ray driving lamps, chrome Depress-Beam headlamps, dual C.M. Hall cowl lamps and dual side-mount spares topped with Packard-branded mirrors. The radiator shell features a polished stone guard and is topped with the “Adonis” (a.k.a. “Daphne at the Well”) mascot. The chrome plating shows in excellent condition, with no signs of pitting or blemishes. Six chrome wire wheels are fitted with blackwall tires for a sporty look, giving the car enormous presence. The body is very accurately constructed, down to the small trunk on the rear deck and the offset driver’s seat. Being a sporting roadster, the cabin is simple and purposeful. Brown leather has taken on a pleasing patina from use, but remains in very good condition having been recently conditioned. The steering wheel also shows a nice patina, the sign of a car that has been used and enjoyed on the road for many years. The instruments are original issue Packard, with a lovely Jaeger 8-day clock facing the passenger. The cockpit is trimmed with a polished bright alloy rail, adding to the sporting flavor of the body. The big straight eight engine (wearing serial number 184009) is well detailed with clean and tidy presentation. Having been regularly driven, it shows some typical patina from use which only adds to the appealing, inviting nature of this great sporting Packard. The engine retains its correct finned intake, finished properly in black ceramic. The cylinder block and head are painted correct Packard green and the crankcase remains in bare cast material as original. The presentation is pleasing and accurate, with no major modifications for road duty. A recent gearbox rebuild ensures reliable and easy motoring. Having enjoyed regular maintenance and use, this rare and desirable Packard is ready to continue thrilling its next keeper. It is FIVA registered and eligible for numerous events worldwide. This is a rare opportunity to acquire a Packard Speedster, arguably one of the finest driver’s cars of the period.  

    For sale
    $595,000(£0) $595,000(£0)
  • 1929 Packard 645 Roadster

    $259,500(£0) $259,500(£0)

    By the time Packard’s Sixth series had hit dealership floors, Packard was well established as the undisputed king of the American luxury car marketplace. Mechanically, the Sixth series was tried and true Packard. A robust and beautifully engineered chassis featured conventional suspension, powerful four-wheel mechanical brakes and Packard’s proven 384 cubic inch inline eight, delivering 120 horsepower. A 3-speed manual transmission with synchronized gears made for a very easy and pleasurable experience for driver and passenger alike. Packard’s reputation for quality was virtually unsurpassed, and for the sixth series they continued to offer their loyal clients a huge variety of body styles to choose from, from formal and conservative to sporty and sleek. No fewer than twenty-one body styles were available on the top-range Model 645. Of those bodies, eight were standard factory styles while a further thirteen were from the semi-custom catalog. Rollston, LeBaron and Dietrich each offered these semi-custom bodies with Dietrich designs counting among the most sporting styles. Ray Dietrich had worked as a draughtsman for LeBaron before breaking off to form his own firm in 1925. Some believe he was canned after spending too much time dreaming up his new business plan whilst on LeBaron company time. Regardless of the circumstances, Dietrich was a talented designer responsible for many of the finest bodies of the period. His time at the firm that bore his name was short-lived, however; he left in 1930 as the Great Depression took its hold on the custom coachwork industry. Thankfully, his short time was marked with a number of exquisitely designed and constructed automobiles, his work being favored by a great many Packard clients. This 1929 Packard Custom-Eight wears a very attractive and desirable Custom-Catalog roadster body by Dietrich. A top of the line model, it rides on a grand 145.5 inch chassis, which lends the signature long rear deck equipped with a rumble seat. It is one of just 2,061 645s sold, a mere fraction of the 35,000 total Packards produced in 1929, making it among the rarest of the sixth series. This example wears an attractive older restoration that has been well-maintained in good order. Paint quality is good, with a tan main body contrasting chocolate brown fenders, chassis and feature lines, accented with orange coach stripes. Panel fit and alignment is very good, and the paint shiny and attractive, with only a few minor blemishes from use. The restoration appears to have been done to a high standard, the car winning awards at the Meadowbrook Concours d’Elegance in the 1990s. The chrome is in generally good order, though it is beginning to show some slight pitting in places. Accessories include a Goodess of Speed mascot, dual sidemount spares with polished covers, and a golf-bag door. Depress Beam headlamps in chrome are supplemented by a pair of Trippe Light driving lamps, chrome cowl lamps and dual C.M. Hall spot lamps. In 1929, Packards still could be had with wooden spoke or solid disc wheels, however this car wears a set of beautiful chrome wire wheels, an $80.00 option in 1929. The wheels are freshly detailed and shod with new whitewall tires. With its light patina, it still remains a very pretty car, as well as an imposing one on that long, 145.5 inch wheelbase. The sporting cockpit is trimmed in very nice dark tan leather which still presents very well, particularly against the body colors. Dark tan carpet is simple and tidy, and an alloy pyramid-pattern floor board surrounds the shifter and hand brake levers. Being a roadster, it wears a fairly basic convertible top which is in good order, trimmed in brown canvas. A matching top boot and side curtains are included, also in good condition. Behind the big original steering wheel, the instrument panel is correctly finished in woodgrain paint over steel, with original gauges, including the Jaeger clock, in good condition. Door panels are in very good condition, capped with attractive wood trim. Packard’s big 384 cubic inch straight eight is in good condition on this example, with the block and head finished in correct Packard green over a natural finish crankcase. The engine shows a bit of wear from regular use on the finished surfaces, but remains tidy and appears to have been well-serviced. The firewall and accessories all appear in good condition and the Packard body tag and ID numbers are intact and visible. Overall, this is a very attractive yet usable Packard 645 that has benefitted from a good quality restoration and has been well-maintained since. It would make a very fine choice for touring given its condition the performance characteristics of the Sixth Series. With its massive wheelbase and desirable, stylish Dietrich coachwork, this handsome Packard captures the essence of the late-twenties sportsman.

    For sale
    $259,500(£0) $259,500(£0)
  • 1937 Packard Twelve Dual Cowl Phaeton

    $650,000(£0) $650,000(£0)

    In 1937, Packard produced a very respectable 122,593 cars, a number which they were rightly quite proud of. Of that total, however, a mere 1,300 left the famous Detroit plant with the spectacular twelve-cylinder engine. Period press accolades declared these later series Packard Twelves (1932-1939) as “the nearest thing to steam” such was their seamless, silken and relentless power delivery. The 437 cubic-inch V12 was a beautiful design, said to have inspired Enzo Ferrari to power his own cars with 60-degree V12 engines. Producing a full 175 horsepower, it equaled that by made by the mighty Cadillac Sixteen. By 1937, the Fifteenth-series Packard Twelve had gained independent front suspension adapted from the Junior models, as well as four wheel vacuum-assisted hydraulic brakes and a synchromesh transmission, making it one of the most satisfying of all pre-war Packards to drive, even by today’s modern standards. The 1932-1939 Packard Twelves are still considered by many to be among the finest American automobiles ever produced. Packard traditionally eschewed ornate, showy bodies in favor of sophisticated style and mechanical superiority, and the Twelve was no different. Of the approximately 5,800 examples produced, most were fitted with coachwork that was sophisticated and stylish, but erred toward the conservative side. But a few examples of the Twelve did manage to get into the hands of the more extravagant buyers and were fitted with flamboyant bodies, perhaps the best known among these was LeBaron. Inspired by the great 1934 Packard Twelve LeBaron Sport Phaeton, this striking 1937 Packard is a genuine 15th Series Twelve, wearing custom one-off coachwork and presented in stunning condition. This particular chassis was originally sold by Los Angeles dealer Earl C. Anthony, Inc. wearing limousine coachwork. Somewhere along the way, the limousine body was removed and never replaced. Many years later, the chassis was discovered on the East Coast, mechanically complete but missing most of the rear body. The car was purchased by a German collector, who commissioned the mechanical restoration as well as the design and construction of the gorgeous body it now wears. The car was handed over to Trevor Hirst Restoration and Coachwork in the U.K., where the chassis was carefully stripped down, and, alongside the engine, fully restored using many genuine parts sourced from American Packard experts. The owner drew his inspiration from the LeBaron Sport Phaeton which was an earlier design than his 1937 chassis, posing some issues with proportion and fit which were overcome using sophisticated computer-aided design, as well measurements taken directly from a genuine example in California. An intricate ash frame was built to support the skin, and the panels were crafted using traditional English coachbuilding techniques. Details such as the windscreen frames, door hinges and convertible top frame were engineered and hand built in Mr. Hirst’s workshop. The level of detail and quality of the craftsmanship is truly astounding, and in spite of the modern time line, this is a truly coachbuilt Packard in the most traditional sense. The expert workmanship shines via the beautiful and visually striking metallic indigo paintwork. The modern color suits the flamboyant LeBaron-inspired lines beautifully, and the carefully selected light cream interior provides a lovely contrast. It rides on a set of steel wheels with chrome beauty rings and chrome Packard Twelve wheel covers, which are mounted with wide-whitewall bias-ply tires for the proper road feel and handling. The chrome plating is executed to concours standards with the big bumpers, radiator slats and headlamps presenting in beautiful order. The interior is equally stunning, trimmed in high quality cream colored leather on the seats and door panels. Beautiful oatmeal carpets are bound in matching leather, and the fit and finish is excellent. The dash is finished to a very high standard in lovely light burl wood with an original Packard Twelve fascia housing modern instruments. The rear cowl hinges upward for easy access to the passenger compartment and the soft top is fully functional, covered with a dark blue canvas boot when folded. Mechanically, this car was built to be driven. It starts readily and runs strong, rewarding the driver with excellent road manners. The specification was enhanced with a large capacity fuel tank as well as a stainless steel exhaust system and the engine is properly detailed in correct Packard Green to original spec. It has been regularly used by the most recent owner and it is reported to be a thoroughly enjoyable car for touring. The quality of the construction and beautiful presentation would surely make it welcome in show events with new coachwork classes, or simply an outstanding and gorgeous machine to drive and enjoy with the whole family. Regardless of how you choose to enjoy it, this is a genuine Packard Twelve in excellent mechanical order wearing a stunningly beautiful body, hand built by a gifted craftsman at great expense.

    For sale
    $650,000(£0) $650,000(£0)
  • 1928 Packard 443 Murphy Convertible Sedan

    $225,000(£0) $225,000(£0)

    The summer of 1927 saw Packard introduce its newest model, known officially as the Fourth Series, or the 4-43. Based on a 143” wheelbase and powered by the same proven 385 cubic inch inline eight-cylinder engine as the 1926 models, this new car represented a typically evolutionary step forward for Packard. The legendary straight eight featured nine main bearings, L-head valve arrangement and produced 109 horsepower, delivered with sublime smoothness. The engineers at Packard always strove for excellence in reliability, drivability and quality, and they earned the company’s status as producers of some of the finest American cars of the era. As usual with high end pre-war manufacturers, Packard had the freedom to choose from an array of standard catalog bodies, or they could select a custom body built by any number of favored coachbuilders of the era. One of the most prestigious of those American coachbuilders was Walter M. Murphy Coachbuilders of Pasadena, California. Originally from Detroit, Walter M. Murphy was practically born to be in the automobile business. His uncle, William H. Murphy, had bankrolled Henry Ford in 1899 and later worked closely with Henry Leland of Cadillac and Lincoln fame. Young Walter moved to California in 1904, and opened his first dealership in Los Angeles in 1916, representing Simplex and Locomobile. Success came quickly and by 1920, he operated the premier West Coast Lincoln distributorship. At the same time, he recognized the demand for top quality coachwork was not being met, especially to the tastes of his California clientele, so he hired the best talent he could and established Walter M. Murphy Co. coachbuilding. Word spread of Murphy’s quality and exquisite style, particularly among Hollywood elite and the California business world. Their bodies would go on to grace a great number of special European chassis from the likes of Mercedes Benz, Minerva, and Bentley. Murphy also holds the distinction of providing more bodies for Duesenberg J and SJ chassis than any other coachbuilder – nearly a quarter of total production. The intersection of Murphy and Packard was a natural one, as both companies demanded excellence in their products. However, given the more conservative nature of Packard buyers, very few of them opted for Murphy coachwork, making them exceptionally rare finds today. This striking example is one such Packard to originally wear a Murphy body, in this case, a gorgeous “Clear Vision” convertible sedan. While the earliest history of this particular car is yet unknown, it was purchased by its most recent owner some 40 years ago as a restoration project. As so often happens, life and business took precedent over the Packard, but the owner held on to the car, knowing he had something special on his hands. Finally, within the last 10 years, the owner was able to treat the car to a much-deserved, no-expense-spared, body-off restoration undertaken by Vintage Motorcars of Westbrook, Connecticut. This Packard 4-43 Custom Eight is now presented in a wonderful combination of two-tone red, featuring a bright red main body and subtle, darker red fenders, chassis and body feature lines. A dark red canvas top and two-tone disc wheels complete the look, in a subtle, yet visually imposing manner highlighting the masterful Murphy styling. The restoration is excellent, with superb paint and finish quality. Chrome drum-style Tilt Ray headlamps flank the chrome Packard radiator grille, which is topped with a Packard Moto Meter in combination with a Goddess of Speed mascot. The rear features an upholstered, fitted trunk as well as a trunk rack to handle any additional luggage. Dual side mount spares and painted disc wheels have been fitted with fresh black-wall tires that lend this car a marvelous, aggressive look. The bumpers are accented with red-painted brackets, further enhancing the sporting appearance of the Murphy bodywork. The lavish interior is trimmed in gorgeous and supple tobacco-colored antiqued leather. The quality and execution are outstanding, with the deep brown colors wonderfully judged against the rich red of the body and canvas top. Door panels are trimmed in the same subtle antiqued leather as the seats, with intricate stitching and beautiful detail. Like the seats, the brown carpets are expertly fitted, lining the front and rear compartments as well as the lower edges of the door cards. We particularly like the details such as leather covered sills with Murphy badges grace all four doors. The marvelous interior not only looks fabulous, but when viewed in person, the colors, materials and quality can be truly appreciated. As a convertible sedan, this Packard features a fully opening soft top, with the all-weather comfort afforded by roll up windows that seal tight against the top frame. The dash is equipped with original instruments and is finished to original specification with a beautiful wood grain finish. A stylish finish touch is the marbleized shift knob topping the gear lever. Packard’s turbine-like 385 cubic inch inline-eight is presented in excellent condition, detailed to a high standard in correct Packard green with black porcelain manifolds. A set of period Champion spark plugs demonstrate the level of detail achieved in the restoration. Since the project was completed, this stunning 4-43 Custom Eight has been minimally shown and is eligible for any number of AACA, CCCA or similar events. Show quality finishing, excellent road manners and stunning Murphy coachwork combine to make this one seriously rare and highly desirable Packard.

    For sale
    $225,000(£0) $225,000(£0)
  • Packard Eight Saloon '38

    €44,950(£0) €44,950(£0)

    Lowered price from €55.000 -> €44.950 Packard was an American luxury-type automobile marque built by the Packard Motor Car Company of Detroit, Michigan, and later by the Studebaker-Packard Corporation of South Bend, Indiana. The first Packard automobiles were produced in 1899, and the last in 1958. The Packard One-Twenty was produced from 1935 through 1937 and again from 1939 through 1941. The One-Twenty signified Packard's move into the mid-priced eight cylinder market; a highly competitive segment that was filled with many marques with numerous offerings, options and price ranges. The move had been made due to financial reasons and the need to stay competitive; the Great Depression was taking its tool on the entire automotive industry but mostly on the high priced manufactures. The lower cost marques also had a tough time but a few were still able to move a considerable amounts of products and wade out this terrible time in history. The One-Twenty was quickly designed, created, and made ready for sale. First offered in 1935, it could be purchased in numerous body styles that included coupes, convertibles, and two- and four-door configurations. Under the hood lurked an L-Head eigh

    • Year: 1938
    • Mileage: 99982 mi
    For sale
    €44,950(£0) €44,950(£0)
  • Packard Eight Woody Wagon '47

    €90,000(£0) €90,000(£0)

    High quality older restauration ( Very beautiful and stately presentation. Ready to enjoy and ideal for a Packard enthusiast to share with his family. Packard Super Eight was the name given to the larger of the two 8-cylinder luxury automobiles produced between 1939 and 1951. After 1942, Packard concentrated on the new Clipper styling that was developed for an upper-class sedan the previous year. There were Super Clippers and Custom Super Clipper in the One-Sixty and One-Eighty tradition until 1947. After a heavy facelift, the name Clipper was dropped. The most senior Super Eight One-Eighty became the Custom Eight, while its slightly lower-priced sibling, the Super Eight One-Sixty, once again became simply the Super Eight. Clipper Custom Super Eights and Custom Eights were very close relatives to their respective Super models, distinguished outside by the lack of an eggcrate grille and small rear chrome trim moulding under the trunk lid on Supers. In 1949, a new Super Eight Deluxe was added to the line. This car had also the Custom Eight's eggcrate grille, but not the rear trim. The entire range of Packard's motorcars was renamed for the 1951 model year (twenty-fourth series), when

    • Year: 1947
    • Mileage: 8827 mi
    For sale
    €90,000(£0) €90,000(£0)
  • 1934 Packard Eight Convertible Sedan

    $177,500(£0) $177,500(£0)

    It’s a long-held belief among many Packard enthusiasts that the 11th series, introduced in August of 1933, represents the pinnacle of style and substance for this storied marque. Of course, every car has its fans as well as its detractors, but one look at the gorgeous full-figured styling of the 1934 Packard and it is easy to see why so many have fallen for its charms. Not only was the 11th series beautiful to look at, it was also one of the best driving automobiles in its category with exceptional torque from the inline 8 cylinder and a beautifully engineered chassis. Packard’s traditionally conservative approach to engineering continued, with an emphasis on reliability, durability and ease of operation. Available as the Eight, Super Eight and Twelve, the 11th series was offered in three lengths of wheelbase and a wide variety of standard and “custom catalog” bodies. LeBaron and Dietrich offered the most prestigious designs and all told, 41 different combinations of wheelbase, engine specification and body style were offered to clients, assuring buyers a high level of exclusivity regardless of the options they chose. One of the rarest and most expensive of the available bodies was the Convertible Sedan. This body offered all-weather comfort combined with open air style thanks to its full folding top and roll up side windows. The curvaceous fenders offset the long, low roofline with fabulous effect, making this one of the most classically beautiful motorcars of the era. This beautiful 1934 Packard 1101 Convertible Sedan is a very well restored example wearing a very rare and desirable body style. It is one of just seven of its kind known by the Packard Club (out of more than 5,000 units of the 1100-1102 range) and it has earned both the prestigious AACA and CCCA Senior awards. It is finished in a very striking tri-tone combination of a tan main body over black fenders with black and orange highlighting the swage lines and top surfaces. Orange wire wheels shod with wide whitewall tires tie the look together nicely while subtle off-white coach stripes adorn the fenders. It is a very pleasing and attractive color combination that suits the body style quite well. Paint quality is overall very good, with the older restoration still showing exceptionally well, with just a few minor signs of age. Body fit and finish is excellent and it is well detailed with dual sidemount spares, a chrome radiator shell, dual Trippelight driving lamps, dual exterior mirrors and a gorgeous Packard Cormorant mascot.  A large period trunk sits atop the original trunk rack, along with a tan cover that matches the top upholstery. The overall look is of a wonderfully restored and exceptionally well-maintained motorcar that is ideally suited for regular use. The interior is trimmed in cognac leather with very attractive dark brown carpets and nicely restored wood trim embellishing the dash and door caps. The upholstery is in very good order, appearing to have seen little use and very good care since the restoration. The original steering wheel shows some wear in places, but is still lovely and in keeping with the usable spirit of this car. Interior brightwork is excellent and the dash retains its original instruments. The rear compartment features an interesting and seldom-seen addition of a chrome heater duct in the floor as well as dual cigarette lighters and ash trays for rear passengers. The large folding top operates well and the tan material is in very good condition. Packard’s 320 cubic inch inline eight cylinder engine produced 120 horsepower in original form. Power delivery is silky smooth and the 3-speed synchromesh transmission is an absolute joy to operate. The engine is very nicely presented, showing some signs of use on the restored finishes, but appearing largely correct and properly detailed.  The 136” wheelbase makes for a smooth and controlled ride while four-wheel vacuum-assisted brakes aid in making this an exceptionally easy handling automobile. It is this easy-driving character that makes Packards of this era such fine choices for touring. This wonderful example has been treated to an award-winning restoration and remains in outstanding order, with just enough slight patina to encourage regular use. Some maintenance records as well as ownership history will be included in the sale. Status as a senior-awarded CCCA Full Classic makes this fine motorcar eligible for a wide variety of events and tours.

    For sale
    $177,500(£0) $177,500(£0)
  • 1939 PACKARD 1707 V-12 CONVERTIBLE VICTORIA

    POA POA

    1939 Packard 1707 V-12 Convertible Victoria Chassis number: B602372 One of 17 V-12 1707 Victoria Convertibles built in 1939! 2003 AACA National First, Senior and Premier Award Winner! This 14th Victoria Convertible produced in 1939 was sold new on August 5th, 1939 for $5,232. The car is finished in a sparkling black with a matching high-quality convertible top and sits on a generous 134” wheelbase. The interior is done in red leather seating and door panels with burl walnut wood grain on the instrument panel and door tops to provide a luxurious look. Equipment includes desirable options, among them the $240 column shifter, covered dual side mounted spare wheels, Trippe lights, front optional bumper guards, side mirrors and a radio mounted on the firewall with a push-button dashboard-mounted dial. The radio antenna is a functioning part of an extremely special hood ornament that generates even more rarity for this already rare machine. The Cormorant mascot antenna is worth several thousands of dollars in today’s market, if one can be found. Mechanically, the Victoria Convertible is equipped with a synchromesh three-speed standard transmission and is easy to handle with Packard’s mec

    • Year: 1939
    For sale
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  • 1933 PACKARD SUPER EIGHT MODEL 1004 7-PASSENGER SEDAN

    POA POA

    1933 Packard Super Eight Model 1004 7-Passenger Sedan Chassis no. 654-I63 Engine no. 751263 385ci Side-Valve Inline 8-Cylinder Engine Single Stromberg Carburetor 145bhp at 3,200rpm 3-Speed Manual Transmission Front and Rear Leaf Spring Suspension 4-Wheel Servo-Assisted Drum Brakes *Subject of a $250,000 restoration *2013 AACA Senior First Place winner *High quality Packard from the peak of the classic era *CCCA Full Classic™ 1933 Packards are wonderfully made and styled automobiles - it was only a shame there were so few who could afford to buy them. 10th series production totaled a meager 4,800 units, a far cry from the 16,613 for the 9th series, and way down from the nearly 55,000 sold in 1929. The 10th series would represent Packard's smallest output of the Classic era. Built on the 142-inch wheelbase, the model 1004 was offered with 14 individual body styles. Priced at $3,090 at new, the 7-Passenger Sedan was one of the more expensive body styles available but was still one of the more popular ones for its luxurious practicality. All the same, only 1,327 Super Eight chassis were built, 788 of which were the longer wheel base models. This specific sedan has been the fortunate re

    • Year: 1933
    For sale
    POA POA
  • 1934 Packard Super Eight Coupe

    $169,500(£0) $169,500(£0)

    Long considered one of the most beautiful of all Classic Era production automobiles, Packard’s gorgeous 11th series is one of the finest of its kind. These gorgeous machines marked the turning point for Packard styling, as the full-figured front fenders grew ever more integrated into the bodywork from 1935 onward. Not only beautiful, they were also magnificently engineered – conservative in terms of technology, but robust, exceptionally well-constructed and very rewarding to drive. The three models of the 11th series were available on three different wheelbase chassis. In total, 41 different combinations of engines, wheelbases and body styles were available to buyers. Adding diversity and prestige to the range were 17 'catalog customs' bodied by coachbuilders LeBaron and Dietrich. The two-seat (with rumble seat) coupe body was one of the most sporting styles on offer, appealing to wealthy playboys who didn’t have to worry about seating a family. Only the two-seat roadster could top the coupe in terms of pure form over function. For many years, the two seat coupe was seen as an ideal candidate to convert to an open roadster, when values for the roadsters skyrocketed, many unscrupulous restorers took advantage by lopping the roofs off coupes. As a result, an uncut, unmolested coupe has become a true rarity in the Packard world. With newfound appreciation for these gorgeous automobiles, they have become ever more desirable, particularly for enthusiasts who enjoy touring with their Packards. The Rumble Seat Coupe strikes an ideal balance of stunning style with all-weather capability. Combine that with legendary Packard reliability and ease of use, and you have a near-perfect choice for classic touring and events. Our featured 1934 Packard Super Eight Coupe is a very fine example of this rare and desirable factory body. Very few have survived over the years, with many being rebodied or cut into roadsters. The most recent keeper of this lovely Packard acquired the car from long-term ownership on the East Coast. The older restoration presents exceptionally well in its striking two-tone paint combination of red with dark burgundy fenders and swage lines. The paint looks great, but up close it is showing its age, with some crazing evident in the red.  It is well optioned with dual side-mount spare wheels with fully enveloping metal covers, Swan radiator mascot, dual Trippe driving lights, and gorgeous new chrome wire wheels shod with proper wide whitewall tires. Red painted brake drums appear behind the chrome wires, imparting a decidedly sporty look. The chrome trim is in very good condition, showing just a slight bit of age in places but otherwise still supremely attractive and in keeping with the overall feeling of quality of this restoration. This is quite simply a visually stunning machine from all angles, the proportions border on perfection, thanks in no small part to the grand 142” wheelbase of the Super Eight chassis. Occupants of this wonderful machine are cosseted in freshly upholstered black leather seats. Matching black door panels are capped with gorgeous wood trim which flows into a beautiful woodgrain dash. The instrument panel features a full array of gauges in a beautifully detailed chrome and paint binnacle. The dash, steering wheel and instruments show just a slight bit of patina from use since the restoration, making it a very pleasing and comfortable place to spend an afternoon of motoring. This being a two-place coupe, a rumble seat is out back for occasional rear passengers, which is trimmed in black leather to match the cabin. Packard’s big 384.8 cubic inch L-head inline eight produces a silken 145 horsepower and an ocean of effortless torque. It puts power through a three speed manual gearbox which is known for its ease of operation and smooth shifting. Every car enthusiast should experience driving a Packard of this era at least once, as they are surprisingly tractable, incredibly smooth and remarkably easy to drive for such a large and grand car. This example’s big Eight is tidy and clean in the engine bay, presented in proper Packard green on the block with a silver crankcase. Importantly, it is also the original engine to this car, as indicated by the chassis and engine numbers being in very close sequence. Correct plug wires and other details make for an attractive yet functional look. Some signs of use are apparent, making this a car that encourages one to drive rather than to sit it in a garage and keep sterile. The chassis is likewise tidy and fully functional, with excellent four-wheel mechanical brakes keeping things under control. The 1934 Super Eight is one of the most highly regarded models from Packard, and many enthusiasts believe the 11th series to be the pinnacle of this storied marque. This gorgeous example is of course a recognized CCCA Full Classic and would be a simply sublime choice for CARavan touring, AACA Touring or simply weekend exploring your favorite roads.    

    For sale
    $169,500(£0) $169,500(£0)
  • 1928 Packard Eight Dual Windshield Phaeton

    POA POA

    Most enthusiasts will agree that Packard’s glory days began in earnest in the late 1920s and ran through the mid-1930s. During this time, the famed Detroit automaker was building some of the finest automobiles on the market, expanding its reputation around the world and supplying machines to moguls and Hollywood stars. The over-engineered nature of their chassis and engines earned them a reputation of exceptional reliability. Packard also offered a staggering array of body, chassis and engine combinations that could be tailored to suit virtually any client, providing they had the necessary funds. For the more discerning clientele with deeper pockets, a chassis could be fitted with a bespoke body by any one of twenty custom body builders at their disposal. Packards of this era were grand, yet elegantly restrained. They are considered by many to be the very finest automobiles of their time. The model 443 of 1928 was part of the Fourth Series and was one of the most impressive automobiles of its day. It rode on an immense 143” wheelbase regardless of body style, giving it a sense of presence that few could match. Motivation was courtesy of a nearly silent straight-eight that displaced 383 cubic inches, and produced an understressed 109 horsepower and a steady wave of torque. As with other Packards of this period, the 443 was not an intimidating car to drive thanks to the slick gearbox, powerful brakes and excellent road manners, and it was preferred by famous people the world over, including famous French aviator Dieudonne Costes and H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, among others. Our featured example is a 443 Eight dual-windshield Phaeton from 1928. This is an extremely well-preserved older restoration that performs well and presents in very attractive condition. The body is finished in a handsome combination of medium brown with dark brown beltline, black fenders and dark orange disc wheels and body accents. It’s a surprisingly attractive combination that sets this car apart from others. The signature Packard disc wheels are fitted with whitewall tires all around, including the dual sidemount spares. The styling is very sporting for a large car, particularly with the canvas top erected, which imparts a rakish and aggressive look, particularly in profile. Paint quality and body work are excellent on this quality restoration. The chrome and brightwork are in similarly excellent condition, showing deep shine and minimal flaws. The imposing Packard radiator shell is protected by a stainless steel stone guard, while windwings, cowl lamps, outside mirrors and a trunk rack round out the accessories. The gorgeous interior is trimmed in dark tan leather which finely complements the exterior paint colors. Being a dual-windshield Phaeton, rear passengers have their own adjustable windscreen with windwings to keep them comfortable and unruffled during a top-down blast. A past owner installed a set of handsome wooden cabinets behind the driver’s seat which appears to be the only deviation from originality in the cabin, and would make a rather nice drinks-cabinet to keep rear passengers even happier than they would already be. The wood dash and door caps are restored with deep gloss and the instruments presented beautifully in the center of the fascia. Certainly stylish and dapper, this Packard is also mechanically excellent, thanks to regular use and care since the restoration was completed. The 383 cubic inch inline eight cylinder starts readily and performance is excellent for a car of this size and stature. The grand 443 has a tendency to shrink around the driver once out on the road making them among the most enjoyable large classics to drive and extremely popular among touring enthusiasts. Thanks to the obvious care this example has received, it remains attractive enough for show. As a CCCA approved Full Classic, it would be extremely well-suited for CARavan Touring and a welcome addition to any collection of fine automobiles.    

    For sale
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