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Brightwells, Leominster auction report

Ex-TVR boss DB5 sells for £182,000 at Brightwells' Leominster sale

Brightwells, Leominster auction report

The ex-Peter Wheeler Aston Martin DB5 was the star lot at Brightwells’ last sale of 2012 – and it looked great value at the £165k hammer price, or £182,000 all in, as Brightwells’ 10% buyers’ premium is among the cheapest in the business. The former TVR boss bought the racer in 2006 and had it toned down into a fast road/track day car, though it still retained its roll cage, pulled rear arches for fatter rubber and a 327bhp 4.2-litre engine with electronic ‘brain’. Even missing much of its original trim it looked great value when standard road cars are at least £100,000 more. Second highest price went to a restored and fully sorted 1937 Alvis Speed 25 SB saloon at £70,400, while a better-than-new Fiat 500A Topolino from the same year fetched £16,060.

As ever, the sale included a few restoration projects: a 1959 Austin-Healey Sprite created a lot of interest, spread out on the floor in component form with its Frogeye bonnet in front of it, and sold for £3190, a barn-find 1933 MG Midget J2 cost £11,220 and a tatty Riley Nine Special drew £16,720. Sadly the Citroen SM, unused for many years, scared off potential buyers when it sprang a leak in the hall. A 1964 Mini at the other end of the restoration cycle, appearing in the catalogue as a bare shell and assembled just in time to be pushed into the display hall the night before the show, was £9240. Two more well-prepared Mini racers were £9460 for a Mk1 Appendix K-spec car and £6380 for a more extreme MkII, while a usable 1977 Aston Martin V8 was £25,300.

A nice Austin-Healey Mk1 two-seater from a deceased estate was good value at £26,400 though the John Chatham-prepared 3000MkII rally car could not reach the £70k needed to buy it, which was far less than it would have cost to build again. Other competition cars did better: the Cirrus-Buick racer with VSCC Buff Form and racing logbook went over estimate but still looked very good value at £31,900, its 5-litre de Havilland aero engine promising plenty of grunt, though the car has lost the tandem wicker seats it arrived with from Australia in 2008, and the ex-Betty Haig Turner 803 racer was £17,380.

A perfect, restored 1929 M-type Midget was £21,175 and a lovely Austin Seven RL Box saloon of the same calibre was £10,340 while a Volvo P1800S, still really nice 20 years after restoration was £15,400. A rare 1953 Lanchester Leda was £2970, a 1970 left-hand drive Porsche 911T with five-speed was on the money at £25,300, while a late-entry 1982 Renault-Alpine A310 fetched £10,560. Sixty-six cars sold out of 107 offered meant a 62% sale rate, but that was attained in a week of floods in the south and west of the country, before the big freeze.

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Brightwells, Leominster auction report
  Brightwells, Leominster auction report
Brightwells, Leominster auction report
  Brightwells, Leominster auction report
Brightwells, Leominster auction report
  Brightwells, Leominster auction report
Brightwells, Leominster auction report
  Brightwells, Leominster auction report
Brightwells, Leominster auction report
  Brightwells, Leominster auction report
Brightwells, Leominster auction report
  Brightwells, Leominster auction report
Brightwells, Leominster auction report
  Brightwells, Leominster auction report
Brightwells, Leominster auction report
  Brightwells, Leominster auction report
Brightwells, Leominster auction report
  Brightwells, Leominster auction report
Brightwells, Leominster auction report
  Brightwells, Leominster auction report
Brightwells, Leominster auction report
 
 
 

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