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Mercedes-Benz 300d cars for sale

8 Search results
Mercedes-Benz 300d
42000 78500 GBP
  • 129 - 1961 Bedford J0 Pick Up

    POA POA

    Bedford Vehicles, usually shortened to just Bedford, was produced by Vauxhall Motors which was ultimately owned by General Motors. Established in 1930 and constructing commercial vehicles, Bedford Vehicles was a leading international truck brand, with substantial export sales of light, medium, and heavy trucks throughout the world. It was GM Europe's most profitable venture for several years. Perhaps the major event of the 1950's, was the transfer of all non-car based commercial vehicle manufacture to the former Vauxhall shadow factory at Boscombe Road, Dunstable. Bedford's Dunstable plant, dating originally from 1942, was extensively rebuilt and extended between 1955 and 1957 when all production lines were said to be over a mile long. Subsequently, all commercial vehicle manufacture would be concentrated here with only vans and car based commercials remaining at the Luton plant. The Bedford TJ was first manufactured in 1958 and was an updated version of the TD range. The TJ was available in the United Kingdom up until 1975, after 1975 it was manufactured only for export. Production continued until 1986, after that it was manufactured by AWD into the early 1990s. Petrol and diesel

    • Year: 2016
    For sale
    Historics at Brooklands
  • Mercedes-Benz 300D Adenauer '58

    €42,000(£37,447.20) €42,000(£37,447.20)

    Lowered price from €51.950 -> €42.000 The Mercedes-Benz Type 300 (chassis codes W186, W188, and W189) were the company's largest and most-prestigious models throughout the 1950s. Analogous to the top of today's S-Class, the Type 300 cars were elegant, powerful, exclusive, and expensive. Two types were produced, a four-door tourer equal in luxury and price but superior in performance to the rival Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud, and and an all but handbuilt two-door sports tourer rarified in elegance, proportion, and cost. The four-door 300, 300b, 300c (chassis code 186), and successor 300d (chassis code 189) models were often referred to as Adenauers after Konrad Adenauer, the first Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany. In office from 1949 to 1963, he employed six custom convertible, hardtop, and landaulet versions during his tenure. These large saloons and cabriolets incorporated many luxury features. Options such as Becker radio, VHF mobile telephone, and dictation machine were geared to the business man and politician. Among the custom features in Chancellor Adenauer's "parade cars" were writing desks, sirens, curtains, dividing partitions, sunroofs, and half-roof landaulet co

    • Year: 1958
    For sale
  • 1960 Mercedes-Benz 300d Sedan

    $78,500(£64,158.05) $78,500(£64,158.05)

    Advertised in period as “The Most Elegant Motorcar in the World”, the W189 Mercedes-Benz 300-series was regarded by many to be the finest engineered and constructed automobile of its time. Early on in production, the 300 earned the nickname “Adenauer”, from the German Chancellor of the same name who had no fewer than six in his fleet. Typically for Mercedes-Benz of the same era, the 300 was substantially strong and overbuilt. Revised and enhanced through several series, the final iteration being the W189, or the 300d, had several distinct features that set it apart from earlier models. For starters, the new, longer hood gave the car a more graceful look, while providing room for an updated version of Mercedes-Benz’s 3-liter SOHC six-cylinder engine now fitted with Bosch fuel injection derived from the 300SL sports car. The wheelbase grew by four inches to align the car with the likes of the Rolls Royce Silver Cloud and afford rear seat occupants plenty of additional legroom. The chassis was so strong, that Mercedes-Benz used a pillar-less design that gave a very stately and elegant appearance with all four windows lowered. When it was new, the 300d cost three times that of a similar Cadillac, showing this was a serious automobile reserved for the wealthiest of clientele. The chassis design was in line with contemporary Mercedes-Benz design, to include independent front and swing-axle rear suspension. The swing axle was well proven but it did have some drawbacks, mainly a propensity to suddenly change camber under load and upset the handling. The solution, introduced on the 300d, was a unique self-leveling device consisting of electric motors actuating jackscrews that moved an extra pair of torsion bars. Unlike later systems, the 300d’s leveling system was driver controllable. From the 300d, all U.S.A. delivered cars were fitted with a Borg Warner three-speed automatic transmission. Larger brake drums and a new brake booster increased the power assist, resulting in much improved stopping distances. With power steering now standard, the 300d offered a much better driving experience than its earlier brethren. This stately and handsome 1960 300d is a very fine, exceptionally well-preserved example of the famous Adenauer sedan. Originally delivered to Europe, it was fitted from new with the very rare Webasto steel sunroof with integrated wind deflector, and still wears its factory original red fabric interior. The large body is very straight and solid, showing evidence of one repaint in its original and attractive slate gray. As one should expect from an unrestored Adenauer, the panel fit and finish is exemplary and the doors open and close with a satisfyingly vault-like feel. Mercedes-Benz used chrome-on-brass for much of the exterior brightwork, meaning it has withstood the test of time beautifully. The bumpers are straight and solid, as are the full polished and painted stainless wheel covers. Inside the opulent cabin is stunningly well-preserved red velour upholstery. There are no rips or excessively worn areas, showing that this was both an exceptionally well-built and well-maintained automobile. Likewise, the original carpets show little wear, only a pleasing patina that comes with gentle long-term care. A Becker Mexico radio resides in the dash and extensive wood trim presents in very original condition, heavily patinated yet completely intact and still delightfully attractive. It would almost be a shame to refinish the woodwork as it wears its age with such dignity. The 3-liter inline-six runs well and pulls nicely through the four-speed transmission. Underhood detailing is not fussy, appearing well maintained but not overly detailed. This car has been carefully used and properly maintained and it shows both inside and out. Equipment includes the original jack, spare wheel, original manual in the pouch as well as an original workshop service manual. Few motorcars of this era offer luxury in such a grand fashion, whether travelling with the family or arriving for official state business. With loads of room and unbeatable comfort, this would make a very fine choice for touring and driving events. Only 3,077 similar cars were produced through early 1962 and few have survived in such wonderfully well-preserved condition with well-known long-term ownership. As when new, this 300d “Adenauer” remains a very exclusive and highly desirable automobile.

    For sale
  • 335 - 1961 Jaguar Mk. II Saloon

    POA POA

    The Jaguar Mk. II was built from 1959 to 1969 as a successor to the 2.4 and 3.4 litre models which were manufactured between 1957 and 1959. It was a handsome, powerful and good handling saloon which was offered with a choice of three six-cylinder twin cam engines; 2.4 litre, 3.4 litre or 3.8 litre. After the appreciation of the Mk.I, Jaguar's successor was well received making a good car even better. Similar in appearance but with a bigger glass area, it boasted a wider track to improve road holding together with minor front suspension changes to reduce body roll and all-round disc rather than drum brakes. Raced by all the top drivers of the day including Graham Hill, Roy Salvadori and Michael Parkes, the Mk. II has scored victories throughout saloon car races in the sixties and was also raced across Europe in the Tour De France and Monte Carlo rally. Finished in the lovely original period colour scheme of pearl grey with a contrasting red interior, this fine example was purchased new via Coombs and Sons of Guilford by R.F.H. Porter on 12th August 1961 as detailed by the original order form in the car's file. According to the document, it was fitted with a badge bar, wind-up radio

    • Year: 2016
    For sale
  • 308 - 1961 Bentley S2 Saloon

    POA POA

    For Bentley and Rolls-Royce, the star of the 1959 London Motor Show was their first all-alloy V8 engine to be found in both the Bentley S2 and its cousin, the Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud II. The engine produced approximately 200bhp (Bentley and Rolls-Royce would never quote horsepower figures, preferring to state that it was 'adequate') and, by virtue of its alloy construction, weighed the same as the 4.8 litre, six-cylinder engine it replaced. The result was a smoother, more powerful ride. Most Bentley S2's carried factory 'Standard Steel Saloon' coachwork satisfying the company's commercial requirements and in total 2,308 Bentley S2's were manufactured. This delightful Bentley S2 is finished in the stylish and desirable tones of velvet green over Tudor grey and is supplied with a large history file containing MoT test certificates, tax and service history dating back to 1992. The car underwent a body restoration in October 2000 through to May 2001 and has had further work carried out in July 2015 to the wings, arches and sills which were stripped back and refurbished; the inner arches were fully wax oiled. Further items overhauled at the time include a manifold and carburettor and i

    • Year: 2016
    For sale
  • 268 - 1961 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud II

    POA POA

    The Silver Cloud II was introduced in 1959 replacing the Silver Cloud I. Little changed externally but it now had a 6.2 litre, V8 engine which pushed the weight to 2.11 tonnes. Performance, however, was greatly improved and top speed was now raised to 114mph. The main improvements though were in acceleration and torque. Power steering became standard and electrically operated windows were now available as an option. The basic architecture of the Silver Cloud II did not change between 1959 and 1963 but there were numerous minor changes implemented, notable among them a succession of improvements to the ventilation system. Interior changes in 1961 included the adoption of blue instrument lighting, the introduction of a combined indicator/headlamp flasher switch and of a handbrake warming light. Presented in Tudor Silver and Shell Grey with St. James' Red Connolly hide, this Rolls-Royce represents the establishment of the early 1960's period with sympathetic restoration works having been carried out to thorough standards. The coachwork is in superb condition with excellent panel fit; chrome bodywork parts have been partially re-plated and bumpers totally restored, a new front windscre

    • Year: 2016
    For sale
  • 246 - 1961 Alvis TD21 Fixedhead Coupé

    POA POA

    The Alvis TD21 was built between 1958 and 1963 and was an updated version of the TC which was liked for its style and performance but passenger and luggage accommodation were unsatisfactory. Accordingly the amalgamated firm of Mulliner Park Ward, by now a Rolls-Royce subsidiary, was approached to re-design the body to meet with British market requirements. The result was the TD21 which was introduced late in 1958. Park Ward's re-design of the body retained a superficial resemblance to Hermann Graber's original but allowed greater room; especially in the rear and better luggage capacity. A car with manual transmission was tested by the British magazine, The Motor, in 1960 and had a top speed of 103mph and could accelerate from 0 to 60mph in 13.5 seconds. A fuel consumption of 20.2 miles per gallon was recorded and cost £2,827 including taxes. This beautiful example of the TD21 is finished in Burgandy with sumptuous beige leather interior and excellent wood dash. Originally sold to the UK, where it resided for much of its life, it was purchased in 1998 by a French owner, Mr. Goris, who took very good care of the coupé which can be demonstrated by the comprehensive history file. The c

    • Year: 2016
    For sale
  • 267 - 1961 Lancia Flaminia by Touring of Milan

    POA POA

    Introduced in 1957, the Flaminia was Lancia's flagship model at that time, replacing the Aurelia. It was available throughout its lifetime as saloon, coupé and cabriolet. The Flaminia coupé and convertible were coachbuilt cars with bodies from several prestigious Italian coachbuilders. The aluminium bodied cabriolet and coupés from Touring of Milan were considerably more expensive than the Berlina models but the designs epitomised the style and design flair of the finest motoring designers of their time. A total of 1,550 2.5 Litre GT Coupés were built by Carozzeria Touring between 1957-62, making them somewhat exclusive in their day. With double wishbones, coil springs and shock absorbers featuring on the new model, the cars performance was nimble and the ride comfort was superior to much of the competition. The Flaminia was named after the "Via Flaminia", a road leading from Rome to Ariminum (Rimini). This respected the established Lancia tradition of naming individual models after Roman roads. This GT Touring Superleggera was completed on 20th February 1961 and is finished in gunmetal grey with burgundy leather upholstery. It was the subject of light restoration in Italy approxim

    • Year: 2016
    For sale
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