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Lincoln
0 189500 GBP
  • Lincoln - Continental Mark V - 1978

    €11,900 - €15,470 est. (£0 - £0 est.) €11,900 - €15,470 est. (£0 - £0 est.)
    Auction Date: 01 Jan 1970
    RESERVE PRICE
    Online Auction
    €11,900 - €15,470 est. (£0 - £0 est.) €11,900 - €15,470 est. (£0 - £0 est.)
    Auction Date: 01 Jan 1970
    RESERVE PRICE
    Catawiki Auctions
  • 1936 Lincoln Model K Convertible Sedan

    $189,500(£0) $189,500(£0)

    From 1931 through 1940, the K-series sat atop the Lincoln lineup, serving as the marque’s flagship offering during the height of, and twilight of, the coachbuilt American motorcar era. The first K-series cars were powered by an L-Head V8 of adequate power, but Cadillac’s headline-stealing salvo in the multi-cylinder war prompted Edsel Ford to respond, and he did so with the commission a V12 engine which was introduced in 1932. The K-series was split between the small displacement KA and the larger and more prestigious KB. By 1934, the series was consolidated and powered by a new 414-cubic inch V12, which remained the basis for the line through 1940. The biggest improvements to the engine came in 1936 with the introduction of hydraulic lifters and a revised cam which allowed for smoother and virtually silent operation. Also from 1936 onward, the engine sat further forward in the chassis, which allowed for greater interior volume, and the body was reworked with a more streamlined appearance. Even with the addition of the Zephyr, Lincoln’s wealthiest clients remained loyal to the Model K, as it still offered the road presence and status of a full-sized, coachbuilt motorcar. Lincoln allowed buyers to specify one of at least 17 different custom-catalog body styles; so each car was built to a standard design with colors and trim chosen by the client. Once selected, the car was built and finished to their tastes. The 1936 K-Series Lincoln was elegant and understated, yet it still had an imposing presence that demanded attention. Ultimately however, sales suffered particularly as the junior series Lincoln Zephyr offered twelve-cylinder prestige at a fraction of the price of the hand-built K-Series. This wonderful 1936 Lincoln Model K wears LeBaron style 334, an elegant convertible sedan body with glass partition riding atop a 145-inch wheelbase chassis. One of just 30 examples of its kind produced, this car is believed to have been purchased new by the Wrigley Family, delivered via a California dealer and kept at the family’s famous Pasadena mansion on Millionaire’s Row. It is not known exactly how long the Wrigley’s retained the car, but it is understood that it remained in California for the next seventy years, eventually joining the legendary broadcaster Art Astor’s extensive collection. It remained with Mr. Astor until its sale in 2008 and it has since been treated to a very sympathetic cosmetic restoration that has been maintained in fine order. The car wears high quality black paintwork that remains in very good condition, atop very straight and sound bodywork. The body is subtly striped in dark red and accessorized with dual side mount spare wheels, dual Trippe driving lamps, dual mirrors and a greyhound radiator mascot. The LeBaron design incorporates an elegantly sloping built-in trunk, while a trunk rack is also fitted for additional luggage capacity. Wide whitewall tires are mounted to optional red wire wheels (stamped steel wheels were offered in 1936 as well) which help to add a pop of color and nicely tie together the interior and exterior themes. Inside the luxurious cabin, dark red leather covers the seats and door panels in front and rear. Roll up side glass keeps occupants warm and dry in poor weather, though we can’t imagine the Wrigley family encountering much of that in beautiful Pasadena! The driver’s compartment has recently been retrimmed as part of the restoration work and shows very light use since; while the rear compartment is believed to still feature the original leather, which remains in excellent condition. Rather unusually for an open body style, this car features a division window to offer privacy to rear occupants. Rear passengers are also treated to individual cigar lighters, foot rests and a lap blanket bar. Up front, the excellent dash features an original radio and good quality instrumentation and switchgear. The black canvas top is excellent and when folded, partially disappears behind the rear seats, lending the car a very sleek and finely resolved appearance whether open or closed. Mechanically, this Model K is in fine order, with the V12 engine running strong and returning very good performance. It drives well on the road, the sympathetic restoration helping to retain a good deal of the original character. The engine shows a fair amount of patina from use but remains tidy and clean, very well suited for touring and regular enjoyment. Thanks to its power and smooth running nature, the Lincoln K-Series is a favorite among tour enthusiasts. This car is a recognized Full Classic by the Classic Car Club of America and therefore eligible for their numerous events. Rare and handsomely presented, this Lincoln K would be a most welcome addition to a collection of Full Classic Lincolns or be a fine choice for any enthusiast seeking a beautiful, LeBaron designed, twelve-cylinder Lincoln to enjoy on the road.

    For sale
    $189,500(£0) $189,500(£0)
  • 1967 Lincoln Continental Convertible

    $36,500(£0) $36,500(£0)

    Chequered Flag International is pleased to offer this 1967 Lincoln Continental Convertible in Powder Blue with Blue leather interior and new Dark Blue Canvas soft top. Sold new in Seattle WA and lived there until this month. Last owner since 1983 - 31 years. Very good body with excellent panel fit. Nice paint, some small chips on the trunk mainly. Fantastic leather interior. Brand new top. Mechanically good, runs and drive nicely. Needs power seat motor. This is a way better than average example. Lots of records spanning 34 years, handbook, etc. Inspections encouraged. All sales AS-IS. Sales tax and license fees due if delivered in California. Visit Chequered Flag International online at chequeredflag.com to see more pictures of this vehicle or call us at 310-827-8665 today to schedule your test drive.

    For sale
    $36,500(£0) $36,500(£0)
  • Lincoln Continental Mark IV '73

    €15,950(£0) €15,950(£0)

    211Hp >>>>> Oldtimerfarm specializes in consignment sales of vintage and collection cars and we are proud to present you this car. Oldtimerfarm is located in Belgium, 9880 Aalter, Steenweg op Deinze 51C, where this car is in our showroom. We are open from Tuesday to Saturday 10-17h (also without appointment). We are closed on Sundays and Mondays. Mondays on appointment only. Make sure you scroll down to look at the extensive photo report (100 pictures). Of course, a more detailed description can be obtained by telephone. Contact us: Xavier: 0032 472 40 1338 (NL, FR, DE, EN, IT) info@oldtimerfarm.be Olivier: 0032 473 11 7300 (NL, FR, DE, EN) olivier@oldtimerfarm.be Oldtimerfarm from Aalter would also like to sell your classic car or car collection. For more information, please contact Xavier. Exhibitions where you can find us: Pictures of the car:

    • Year: 1973
    • Mileage: 20621 mi
    For sale
    €15,950(£0) €15,950(£0)
  • Lincoln Continental Mark VI '80

    €5,950(£0) €5,950(£0)

    141Hp >>>>> Oldtimerfarm specializes in consignment sales of vintage and collection cars and we are proud to present you this car. Oldtimerfarm is located in Belgium, 9880 Aalter, Steenweg op Deinze 51C, where this car is in our showroom. We are open from Tuesday to Saturday 10-17h (also without appointment). We are closed on Sundays and Mondays. Mondays on appointment only. Make sure you scroll down to look at the extensive photo report (100 pictures). Of course, a more detailed description can be obtained by telephone. Contact us: Xavier: 0032 472 40 1338 (NL, FR, DE, EN, IT) info@oldtimerfarm.be Olivier: 0032 473 11 7300 (NL, FR, DE, EN) olivier@oldtimerfarm.be Oldtimerfarm from Aalter would also like to sell your classic car or car collection. For more information, please contact Xavier. Exhibitions where you can find us: Pictures of the car:

    • Year: 1980
    For sale
    €5,950(£0) €5,950(£0)
  • 1936 Lincoln K Convertible Sedan

    $89,500(£0) $89,500(£0)

    Lincoln Motor Car Company’s flagship model in the 1930s was the prestigious Model K. When introduced in 1931, Lincoln was under the full control of the Ford Motor Company, as Henry Leland had been pushed out by a revenge-seeking Henry Ford. Henry put his son Edsel in charge and almost immediately, Lincoln enjoyed a turnaround. The flagship Model K hit the showrooms in 1931 powered by an L-head V8 engine. Power was more than adequate but with ever increasing pressure to build multi-cylinder engines such as the V12 and V16, Ford swiftly responded with the addition of the V12 Model KB in 1932, followed by the smaller displacement KA. The early years of the Great Depression meant that sales were slim, but the V12 remained the signature of the K-series through 1939. The biggest change coming in 1934 when the two available sizes of V12 engines were combined into one singular 414 cubic inch unit. Most of America’s luxury car manufacturers had added entry level lines to boost the bottom line during the Great Depression. Packard had the Junior series, Cadillac offered LaSalle and, while late to the game, Ford introduced the Zephyr range to bridge the gap between top line Fords and the prestigious Model K in 1936. The new Zephyr was also powered by a V12 engine, and was surely stealing sales from its older sibling, but Lincoln continued to offer the Model K for high end buyers, who now had 17 different custom body styles to select from. For the 1936 K-series (the KA and KB monikers had been dropped), styling was tweaked with a raked windscreen, revised radiator grille and optional stamped steel wheels. On the mechanical side, the 414 cubic inch flathead V-12 engine was updated with hydraulic lifters and a revised cam shaft and placed further forward in the chassis sitting to allow for more passenger room. The resulting car was elegant and understated, yet it still had an imposing presence that demanded attention. This 1936 Lincoln K wears a rare and desirable Convertible Sedan body from the Lincoln catalog, fitted to the 136-inch wheelbase chassis. It wears an older restoration that has held up very well, although it is showing its age in a few places. The body is in very nice condition, with straight panels and good fitment of the doors and hood. Paint quality is good, though some small touchups have been made here and there. The colors are indeed a bit unconventional, but the body style itself is quite attractive, with its sloping rear trunk, low roof line, and curvaceous front fenders with dual-sidemount spares. The spare wheels are housed within metal covers that are topped with side-view mirrors. A greyhound mascot adorns the radiator grill, while out back a trunk rack supplements the integrated trunk in the body. Chrome bumpers are in quite good condition, and the painted wire wheels are adorned with chrome center caps and wide whitewall tires. Doors open with a satisfying quality to reveal the brown leather interior which, while older, remains supple and clean. The seats and carpets are in good condition front and rear, exhibiting signs of use but not excessively worn. Instruments appear to be in original condition, along with much of the switchgear. A later turn signal switch has been added for safety. Interior fittings are in good condition and the chrome on the window winders, door handles and other areas remains very presentable. In the rear, a robe rail is affixed to the back of the front seat, and again, the leather is in good presentable condition. The tan canvas convertible top is piped in brown to complement the interior, there is a small repair on the top, but it remains attractive and serviceable. The engine compartment, while not concours, is clean and nicely detailed, the big 414 cubic inch flathead V12 engine starts easily and runs very well, with the signature smooth, virtually silent idle that defines these 1930s multi-cylinder engines. Very few of these open cars were originally sold, since in 1936, a Model K 7-passenger Limousine cost a rather steep $4,700. This more complex Convertible Sedan would have come in above that. Given the competition from within by the Zephyr, it is no wonder that sales of the K were limited. This 1936 Lincoln K features rare and desirable coachwork, and is a very enjoyable car for CCCA CARavans, local shows, or Sunday drives.

    For sale
    $89,500(£0) $89,500(£0)
  • 1934 Lincoln KA High Hat Limousine

    POA POA

    In 1922, Henry Ford exacted revenge on his former nemesis Henry Leland by purchasing the Lincoln Motor Company for $8M. Some twenty years prior, a group of investors led by Leland had forced Henry Ford out of his own business, going to reorganize and re-launch it as Cadillac. Leland soon left Cadillac to found Lincoln Motor Company with his son, and despite a lucrative contract during World War I to supply Liberty aero engines, the company soon hit hard times. Ford was more than happy to bail out Leland, however at a heavily discounted price, a deliberate jab to the man who caused Ford to start from scratch so many years prior. Ford successfully purchased Lincoln, swiftly forcing Leland and his son out of the company. But what was bad for Henry Leland proved quite good for Lincoln Motor Company. Henry Ford put his son Edsel in charge, who wasted little time improving quality and expanding product offerings. By 1923, sales had risen 45 percent, and the company was finally turning a profit. Lincoln was now fully established as a genuine competitor in the luxury marketplace, The K-series was Lincoln’s first all-new product since Leland’s ouster, replacing the ageing and expensive L-series. The K was made available as either a V8-powered KA or V12-powered KB series. A variety of wheelbases and coachbuilt body styles could satisfy virtually any client’s wishes. Ford contracted with a number of premier coachbuilders of the day, such as Brunn, Murphy, Judkins LeBaron and Rollston. By the 1934 model year, the K-series was combined into a single line. The V8 engine had been dropped several years before, as had the small-displacement V12. The only engine available was the beautiful and powerful 414 cubic inch (6.8 liter) twelve-cylinder which would go on to power the K through the end of its run. Mechanically, the KA and KB were identical, with the wheelbase being the only difference between the two. As before, Lincolns were bodied by any number of high quality coachbuilders, including Murray, with whom Ford had a long standing relationship. Murray was primarily a body builder, producing bodies for the likes of Dietrich, as well as for many of Ford’s more pedestrian and commercial models. But they had the skill and facilities to produce limited high-end bodies as well, such as the one fitted to our featured 1934 Lincoln KA. This handsome 1934 Lincoln K-Series V12 (S/N KA2938) wears a rare and interesting High Hat Limousine body by Murray and has been treated to a high quality restoration, which remains in very good and well-maintained condition. It is finished in an understated shade of dark blue, which is accented by gray wire wheels and gray coachlines. While the color combination is understated, the same cannot be said about the rather imposing proportions of the body. The High Hat limousine was of course designed for the gentleman of high social standing who did not wish to remove his hat when climbing aboard, and the rear compartment is generously proportioned with additional head room. The roof is upholstered in black, lending an attractive and formal appearance. Paint quality and body finishing was executed to a high standard, and the car is well detailed with good quality brightwork and fine original equipment. It wears a pair of chrome Flexbeam headlights, dual Trippe Light driving lamps, and a greyhound radiator mascot. Dual sidemount spare wheels adorn the fenders, and a large trunk with an upholstered cover rides on a chrome plated trunk rack. Wide whitewall tires on painted wire wheels continue the theme of formal elegance. The interior is all about traditional limousine accommodations. The driver’s compartment is trimmed in black leather, as it was a harder-wearing material that would not show dirt. The dash is nicely equipped with correct instruments that appear to be in excellent original condition. Beautifully detailed diamond-pattern wood trim adorns the door tops, which has been nicely restored with a period appropriate finish that doesn’t appear over-restored. An opening divider window separates driver from passengers. Rear passengers are treated to a luxurious cabin trimmed in gray broadcloth with matching gray carpeting. The same diamond-pattern wood continues on the door caps, quarter window sills and divider window sill. A pair of jump seats can be deployed for two occasional passengers and the rearmost quarter windows crank open to allow for an airy cabin, an unusual feature for a formal limousine. The quality of the trim and finishing is excellent and the car presents in tidy, clean and attractive order. Lincoln’s alloy-head 414 cubic inch V12 produced 150 horsepower in the typically silky-smooth manner of a 1930s multi-cylinder engine. This example is pleasingly well detailed, showing signs of careful use and regular maintenance since completion, with mainly period correct fittings and hardware. This car was awarded an AACA Senior award in 2012 as well as a CCCA National 1st Place, a testament to the quality and detail put into the restoration. The fascinating body is certainly a talking point, while the K-series chassis and lovely V12 engine make it a fantastic choice for touring. As a CCCA-recognized Full Classic, this Lincoln remains in showable condition, yet would also make a fine and comfortable choice for touring.

    For sale
    POA POA
  • Lincoln Continental Lehmann-Peterson Limousine '68

    €32,950(£0) €32,950(£0)

    From 1961 until 1969, Lincoln produced the fourth generation of his flagship, the Continental. The design was anchored in a "form follows function" simplicity, with a complete absence of ornamentation. Sightlines across the hood, rear deck, and fenders all seemed to vanish to infinity. The overall effect evoked a sense of dignity, great mass, and authority, in motion or parked. For 1968, Lincoln made several styling changes to the Continental. To meet federal safety standards, the parking lights, taillights, and front turn signals were returned to a wraparound design on the fenders to satisfy Federal standards for side marker lights. For the outboard front seats, shoulder seatbelts were added. For 1969, the fourth-generation Continental entered its last year of production. Lincoln added relatively few changes aside from the addition of federally mandated head restraints. At the beginning of the model year, the 460 V8 entered full production, becoming the sole engine in the Lincoln model line until 1977. Lehmann-Peterson was founded in 1963 when Robert "Pete" Peterson met George "Skip" Lehmann. Robert Peterson was in auto racing and for many years he was a chief mechanic, building r

    • Year: 1968
    For sale
    €32,950(£0) €32,950(£0)
  • 1948 Lincoln Continental

    $39,900(£0) $39,900(£0)

    The Classic Car Gallery is proud offer this Rare 1948 Lincoln Continental Convertible. The car is in excellent driver condition, and was clearly restored at some time in her past. This post war Lincoln is one of only 452 produced in 1948 and marks the last model of V12 American car ever produced. The body was repainted in her original Pace Car Yellow and all exterior chrome and trim was either replaced or refurbished. The 292ci V12 runs very well and produces great power and torque. The 130 3-Speed manual transmission shifts smoothly and transitions through gears with ease. The Pace Car Yellow paint is in overall good shape but has some signs of age. The paint has flaked in a few areas, but is in overall healthy condition. The tan canvas top is new, the rear plastic window is clear and the hydraulic top mechanism operates as it should. The Burgundy Leather interior is in excellent shape and has very little wear. The dash and all supporting instrumentation shows well and the clock, radio (radio doesn’t play), gauges all light up and work. The hydraulic windows work well, and all mechanical systems work as they should. The car just received a full tune-up, including fluid change and

    • Year: 1948
    For sale
    $39,900(£0) $39,900(£0)
  • 1925 Lincoln Model L Convertible Coupe

    $115,000(£0) $115,000(£0)

    Henry M. Leland may not be a household name in the same way that Henry Ford is, but his influence on the American automotive landscape is no less important and far reaching. A machinist and inventor who learned tool making in the firearms industry, he was at the leading edge of automobile development at the turn of the 20th century. During his time running the Leland and Faulconer he supplied engines for Ransom E. Olds. He also, incidentally, invented the electric barber’s clipper! In 1902, Leland was brought in to the Henry Ford Company to appraise their assets prior to liquidation. Leland complied but suggested they reorganize and build a car based on an engine Leland supplied to Olds. The new company was called Cadillac and they set to work building some of the finest early motorcars available. Leland applied many of the lessons he learned in the firearms business to the automobile, most importantly, the use of interchangeable parts. Leland sold Cadillac to General Motors in 1909, but remained in charge. He headed the development of the electric self-starter alongside Charles Kettering in 1912. A dispute over the production of Liberty Aircraft engines led to his departure from Cadillac in 1916, and his subsequent founding of another great American luxury marque – Lincoln. The Model L was Henry Leland’s first model since he formed Lincoln Motor Company following his contentious departure from Cadillac. Introduced in 1917, the Model L was designed by Leland’s son-in-law, Angus Woodbridge who, curiously, was trained as a ladies hat maker. In spite of Mr. Woodbridge’s unconventional training, the Model L was a fine car, if perhaps viewed as a bit old-fashioned in its day. Financial troubles hit the company hard during the post WWI recession, and in 1922 Leland sold Lincoln to Henry Ford for $8 million. Ford immediately displaced Leland and Woodbridge, and assigned his own son Edsel to head the new division. Edsel, unlike his father, understood the importance of style on a high end automobile and he designed a new body for the L-series, and improved handling with the addition of hydraulic shock absorbers. They also streamlined the production process, saving vast amounts of money and turning Lincoln into a profitable business in less than a year. By 1925, the robust L-Series was restyled again with a new nickel-plated radiator shell. The 90 horsepower V8 and three-speed transmission remained and the car sold well, offered in a variety of body styles. Our featured example is from 1925 and is dressed in a rare and attractive convertible coupe body by LeBaron. It is finished in a unique tri-tone scheme, with medium khaki body sides, darker hood and accent lines, and black fenders and swage lines. The colors are accented with red pinstripes and red wire wheels, giving a fun and sporting appearance. This Model-L wears a very well preserved older restoration featuring an array of fantastic period accessories. Body lines are very good, and the high quality LeBaron convertible coupe body exhibits excellent fit and finish for the period, however the paint is just starting to show some age. Starting at the front end, it wears nickel plated Drum headlights, a badge bar-mounted drum spot light, and a very rare OWL accessory light mounted high on the radiator shell. Whoever the heroic original owner was in 1925 must have enjoyed high-speed motoring at night! Atop the nicely restored radiator sits the famous Lincoln Greyhound mascot. Moving back, you find drum cowl lights, dual sidemount spare tires with mirrors, an opening windscreen and body side golf-bag door. Rumble seat passengers are treated to their own folding windshield to ensure their comfort and a covered trunk sits out back on a folding rack. The LeBaron designed body is very stylish and well-proportioned with a long, tapering rear deck and it wears the accessories well without appearing overwrought. The cozy cockpit is trimmed in period appropriate cloth which presents in good condition, showing little wear since the restoration was completed. Wood on the dash, door caps and steering wheel are all in good order and the original instrumentation is all intact and attractive. The rumble seat is trimmed in brown leather, which would be correct for the period, as it was harder wearing and more likely to see weather. The flat head 90 horsepower V8 engine is very nicely presented in correct gray paint on the heads and cylinders. Polished hardware, correct clamps and painted accessories round out the detailing. The engine is mated to a 3-speed manual gearbox which is strong and easy to operate. With lots of interesting accessories, a very rare and desirable LeBaron body and a quality restoration that has been very well maintained, this Lincoln L is sure to charm its next owner.

    For sale
    $115,000(£0) $115,000(£0)