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Lincoln cars for sale

8 Search results
9995 115000 GBP
  • Lincoln - Zephyr Saloon - 1940

    €18,500 - €24,050 est. (£16,526.05 - £21,483.87 est.) €18,500 - €24,050 est. (£16,526.05 - £21,483.87 est.)
    Online Auction
    Auction Date: 01 Jan 1970
    Catawiki Auctions
  • 1942 Lincoln Continental Convertible

    $76,500(£62,248.05) $76,500(£62,248.05)

    Edsel Ford was the only son of Henry Ford, but the two men could not have been more different.  Edsel Ford was worldly, gifted with fine taste and a patron of the arts – including his many personally funded commissions that helped American coachbuilders survive the early years of the Great Depression.  It is an irony then that the automobile created to be a tribute to Edsel Ford instead became an embarrassment when it was introduced 14 years after Edsel’s early death in 1943, at the age of 49.  In his highly productive lifetime, Edsel Ford become president of Ford Motor Company and encouraged Ford’s purchase of the Lincoln Motor Company from the founding Lelands.  He persuaded his father to discontinue production of the Model T – the most successful car in the world at the time – and he led the development of the stylish Model A that was sometimes referred to as ‘a little Lincoln’.  He also created the first styling department at Ford in 1935, hiring E.T. ‘Bob’ Gregorie as styling director. The idea of for the Lincoln Continental came directly from Edsel Ford’s worldly view.  The story has been told many times that the younger Ford returned from a European trip struck with the coachwork he observed travelling on the Continent.  Ford tasked Bob Gregorie to create a custom coachbuilt automobile on a Lincoln Zephyr chassis with the clean, unadorned lines and minimal chrome trim of the European cars he admired.  The first Lincoln Continental prototype was shipped to Florida in March 1939, where Edsel Ford and his family wintered at Hobe Sound near Palm Beach.  Edsel Ford’s Continental-style Lincoln was greeted with rave reviews and questions about production from just the crowd he hoped to attract.  A second prototype was constructed for refinement and the Lincoln Continental went into production just six months later in October 1939 as a 1940 model. Like the first prototype, the Continental was constructed with the same 125- inch chassis as the Lincoln Zephyr.  The engine in the first production Continental was a 292 c.i. flathead V-12 producing 120 horsepower, with a three-speed column shifter.  The body was all new.  In comparison with the Zephyr, the driver’s seat was moved back, the hood was longer and both the roof and the side profile of the car were dramatically lowered.  The Cabriolet, like the prototypes, had closed rear roof quarters that visually stretched the length of the car together with the spare tire mounted at the rear of the car.   Interior trim featured a gold colored finish.  The extensively revised 1942 Lincoln Continental shared the Zephyr’s new styling format that was distinguished by a lower ride height and squared off fenders as well as the Zephyr’s wider, two-piece grille.  Engine size increased to 306 c.i. with 130 horsepower.  Like all of the industry, 1942 Lincoln production was cut short for the war effort and a total of only 1,236 1942 Lincolns were produced including just 136 Cabriolets. The automobile offered here is one of only a few 1942 Lincoln Continental Cabriolets that are thought to survive.  The subject of an older ground up restoration, the car presents beautifully today. Finished in Victoria Coach Maroon paint, with a tan leather interior and tan top, the condition of the leather is very good showing only very slight signs of use on the driver’s side.  The paint quality is very good, with nice panel fit and finish.  The fully restored dashboard is pure 1940s glamour, trimmed in proper gold accents that gleam in elegant compliment to both the exterior and the interior. Being a very prestigious car in its day, it is well-equipped with a radio, heater, power windows, power operated convertible top, clock, and full instrumentation.  The wheels are finished with correct chrome hubcaps and trim rings that are in very good condition and the polished chrome trim on the exterior is also in very good condition. The flathead V12 engine looks impressive and is very well detailed in the engine bay. This engine was never intended to make big power, but rather, it was highly regarded for its smoothness in operation. Quiet, silky and with a broad, flat torque curve, it provides effortless operation whether tooling around town or touring long distances on main roads. A three speed manual transmission feeds power to a standard Columbia 2-speed overdrive rear axle.  The car drives smoothly and almost silently, seeming to practically float over the road in comparison with its pre-war contemporaries. This is more than a beautiful car. The restoration has been done to show-driver standards, and it has seen regular use since the restoration was completed. This pre-war Lincoln Continental Cabriolet would be welcomed by the Classic Car Club of America, the Antique Automobile Club of America and the Lincoln & Continental Owners Club – as well as many other events – and would be a standout at any of these gatherings.

    For sale
  • 1956 Lincoln Premiere 2 Door Hardtop

    $49,500(£40,278.15) $49,500(£40,278.15)

    Don Draper should have driven this car.  This red 1956 Lincoln Premiere Series hardtop coupe is everything the Fabulous Fifties were about – forward looking, longer, lower and wider.  The sleek ‘flow-through’ styling eliminated any remaining hint of separate fenders.  The Premiere Series was introduced in 1956 as the top of the line Lincoln – a step up from the previously style-leading Capri line.  The pillar-less hardtop coupe and convertibles took the style to the highest level, with buyers preferring the hardtop coupe by a margin of nearly eight-to-one. “Unmistakenly Lincoln” read the ads and, for once, the car lived up to its expectations.  In the mid-1950s, Lincoln was a venerable luxury brand noted for quality engineering, high performance and understated luxury, searching for a distinctive identity.  The striking new look of the 1956-1957 Lincolns achieved that goal, and represented the only all-new styling in the industry when they were introduced for 1956.  The look clearly reflected elements of the 1953 Lincoln XL-500 and the 1955 Lincoln Futura show cars and seemed aimed directly at prosperous post-war Americans who were building careers, families and Atomic Ranch-style houses.  The design carried forward the nose and the sharply peaked front fenders and elongated rear quarters the XL-500 and Futura predicted, but the clean flow-through look had an identity all of its own.  Interiors also met an expectation of stylish design, quality materials and a certain amount of understatement.  The engine and chassis were same that had dominated the big car class at the Mexican Carrera Panamericana road race in 1952-1953-1954, with a 368 cubic-inch version of Lincoln’s easy-breathing first ohc Y-block V8 producing 275-285 horsepower and 400+ pounds of torque, riding on a 126-inch wheelbase. This pillar-less hardtop example, finished in Huntsman Red with a red and black leather interior accented by a black dashboard cover, carpet and pleated seat inserts, is a very nice older cosmetic restoration that included new paint, new chrome, a new interior and a highly detailed engine compartment.  As originally built, the car luxuriously includes a Lincoln ‘Turbo Drive’ automatic transmission, power steering and brakes, power seat and power windows.  The unique dashboard mounts the speedometer, warning lights and clock above the safety-padded dash panel, with switches below the center of the dash.  Aircraft-style levers mounted to the left of the deep-dish steering wheel control air and temperature.  Exterior details include restrained use of side chrome with gold-colored accents. Period-correct wide whitewall tires are mounted on stylish red wheel rims with Lincoln Premiere logo full wheel covers. This is an automobile that makes a strong statement.  Don Draper didn’t drive this car, but you can – complete, detailed and ready to be enjoyed.

    For sale
  • 1938 Lincoln Zephyr Convertible Sedan

    $115,000(£93,575.50) $115,000(£93,575.50)

    In the early 1930s, Edsel Ford, president of the Ford Motor Company, recognized that a new line was needed to fill the-ever widening gap between top line Fords and the ultra-exclusive, coachbuilt Lincoln K series. Introduced in 1935 as a 1936 model, the all-new Lincoln-Zephyr was meant to be a lower-priced and less expensive alternative to the full-fledged Lincoln, yet still very much a luxury car with its V12 engine and impeccable style. Edsel Ford teamed up with his masterful stylist Eugene “Bob” Gregorie, to pen a gorgeous streamlined body, characterized by its pronounced prow and flowing waterfall-like grilles and exquisite but sparse detailing. It is often considered to be the first commercially successful American streamlined car when compared to the relative failure of the Chrysler Airflow. Particularly in coupe form, the Lincoln Zephyr is seen by many as one of the most beautiful mass-produced American automobiles of all time. But the Zephyr’s beauty was more than skin deep; it was a true luxury car with plenty of equipment and a prestigious twelve cylinder engine under the hood. The John Tjaarda-designed 70 degree V12 was derived from the Ford Flathead V8, and boasted 110hp from 267 cubic inches. Like most V12s of the period it was noted for its smoothness and quiet operation as much for performance. World War II put an end all Ford car production, including the Lincoln-Zephyr, but when car building resumed in 1946 the Zephyr nameplate was dropped though the platform lived on through 1948 as part of the regular Lincoln lineup. Built for the 1938 model year, this extremely handsome Zephyr wears seldom-seen and attractive Convertible Sedan bodywork. The styling is a masterpiece, with gracefully rounded fenders and a subtly tapering tail that mimics the pointed nose. This is one seriously gorgeous style piece. Subject to an older but comprehensive restoration, this Zephyr remains in very attractive condition and appears to have been only lightly used since it was restored. It is finished in gorgeous black paint with a tan convertible top, an elegant combination that highlights the iconic Deco design, particularly in that fantastic oval rear window. The paint quality is excellent and the car presents very well with tight and consistent panel fit and lustrous brightwork. The cabin is trimmed in brown buttoned leather with matching door panels and brown bindings on the oatmeal-colored carpets. The leather is in excellent condition, again showing very little in the way of use and quality restoration work. One highlight of the Zephyr interior is the incredible, Art-Deco dash which features a prominent center console-like design that goes straight to the floor and a shift lever that sprouts from beneath the dash – not unlike that of a Citroen 2CV. With its bold geometric shapes and linear detailing, the cabin is pure Deco style. The tan canvas top is in excellent order, presenting clean and fitting snug, and is equally beautiful in the up or down position. The L-head V12 presents nicely in the engine bay, showing some signs of use but generally tidy and well-kept, as well as properly detailed with period correct fittings and hardware. It runs very well, making this a gorgeous driver or tour car. Beyond the high quality restoration on this rare and desirable Zephyr, the design is worthy of hours of careful study. Eugene Gregorie’s careful attention to detail is beyond reproach and this truly is one of the greatest American automobile designs of all time. We are very pleased to offer such a lovely and cherished example, and we are sure you will delight in its charms, both on the road and when stepping back to soak in its remarkable style.

    For sale
  • 1948 Lincoln Continental

    £25,935 £25,935

    The Classic Car Gallery is proud offer this Rare 1948 Lincoln Continental Convertible. The car is in excellent driver condition, and was clearly restored at some time in her past. This post war Lincoln is one of only 452 produced in 1948 and marks the last model of V12 American car ever produced. The body was repainted in her original Pace Car Yellow and all exterior chrome and trim was either replaced or refurbished. The 292ci V12 runs very well and produces great power and torque. The 130 3-Speed manual transmission shifts smoothly and transitions through gears with ease. The Pace Car Yellow paint is in overall good shape but has some signs of age. The paint has flaked in a few areas, but is in overall healthy condition. The tan canvas top is new, the rear plastic window is clear and the hydraulic top mechanism operates as it should. The Burgundy Leather interior is in excellent shape and has very little wear. The dash and all supporting instrumentation shows well and the clock, radio (radio doesn’t play), gauges all light up and work. The hydraulic windows work well, and all mechanical systems work as they should. The car just received a full tune-up, including fluid change and

    • Year: 1948
    For sale
  • Lincoln Town Car

    £9,995 £9,995

    Lincoln Continental Mk III, in very nice condition, good driving car, nice leather interior, Mk III's becoming scarce and at this price it's a great investment!!

    • Mileage: 49000 mi
    • Engine size: 7500
    For sale
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