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Lamborghini Miura cars for sale

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Lamborghini Miura
849995 999995 GBP
  • - 1968 LAMBORGHINI MIURA P400 - CHASSIS NO. 3510 - Sold new in Italy to a lady in 1968 who sold it to Mr. Peter Wrigley in July 1979. The car's file report that #3510 went back to the Lamborghini factory in 1975 in order to be upgrated to SV specs (only 11 Miura have been upgrated like this one by the factory in the period). It has been fitted with an SV engine (#30608) and had the late SV bodywork. The car stayed 20 years with Mr. Wrigley and then had 3 owners, before we purchased the car. The car have been restored during 2 years (2000 - 2001). It is a rare, perfectly restored example. The original wheels and headlamps are coming with the car. V5C registration (pictures of the car will be added soon.)

    • Year: 1968

    • Last update: 6 days old

    • Mileage: 53641 mi

    For sale
  • GTC Collection Cars
    + 33 (0)4 91 83 01 50
    see details
  • To be OFFERED AT AUCTION at RMs Arizona event, January 15-16, 2015. To view this car and others currently consigned to this auction, please visit the RM website at rmauctions.com/. Estimate:$1,000,000 - $1,400,000 370 bhp, 3,929 cc DOHC transverse mid-mounted alloy V-12 engine with four Weber 40 IDL-3C carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, independent front and rear suspension with A-arms, coil springs, tubular shock absorbers, and anti-roll bars, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 98.4 in.A very desirable late-model S MiuraFactory air conditioning, vented disc brakes, and SV-spec chassisOutstanding color combinationOne of the most exciting recent Miura discoveriesThe Lamborghini Miura, which was named after Don Eduardo Miura Fernndez, the legendary breeder of fierce Spanish fighting bulls, was the very embodiment of the supercar moniker. Prior to the arrival of the Miura in 1967, many sports cars certainly offered high levels of performance and handling, but the Miura was the first to be built around the criteria that defined our modern concept of the supercar: tremendous speed and jaw-dropping design coupled with technical innovation, resulting in a wallet-wilting price tag to which only the wealthiest could aspire.By 1967, the latest version of the Lamborghini V-12 engine, which by now had been enlarged to four liters, was used for the entirely new and radical Miura. This Miura was first shown to a stunned public in March 1966 at the Geneva Salon, and its sinuous body was penned by Bertone designer Marcello Gandini, who was 27 at the time. The Miura development team also included two brilliant engineers who would gain fame in their own rights, Gian Paulo Dallara and Paolo Stanzini.Under the guidance of New Zealander Bob Wallace, the Miuras chassis was carefully tuned to deliver the handling levels needed to contain and exploit the prodigious amounts of available power. With double-wishbone suspension at each corner, the Miuras technical specifications were very advanced for a road going car. The mid-mounted engine was fitted transversely, to allow for a more compact overall layout. The Miuras original design sketches also called for a glass engine cover and a three-seat layout, with the driver in the middle and one passenger on either side. Although this latter feature never made it to the production Miura, it did reemerge on future supercars, most notably on the McLaren F1 of the 1990s.While the glass engine cover was never used, the rear window louvers that did appear on production models were an industry first. As the engine was no longer front-mounted, but rather posteriore, the first generation of Miuras were accordingly named P400. This turned out to be a sensational, trendsetting decision. Almost immediately, the young Lamborghini marque leapfrogged to the head of the class, well ahead of both Ferrari and Maserati, with this innovative mid-engine configuration.The Miuras technical specifications remain impressive even today, as it has a lightweight frame, fully independent suspension, four-wheel disc brakes, and power provided by that well-proven, symphonic V-12 engine. The Miura, which breathed deeply through four triple-choke Weber carburetors, could initially offer 350 brake horsepower on tap and was capable of going over 175 mph. In the hands of the brave, it was more than a match for any other road going production car of the era.A steady process of evolution and improvement was maintained throughout the production cycle of the Miura, and in 1968, the S, or spinto (tuned), version appeared, boasting 370 brake horsepower, updated brakes, and numerous other enhancements. The S version of the Miura was faster, more luxuriously appointed, and more stable, with better braking, and it represented a large step forward from its already magnificent predecessor. The Miura S was capable of reaching 60 mph in just 5.5 seconds and 140 mph in fewer than 30 seconds, and it could also achieve a top speed of 177 mph. In April 1970, Road & Track called it an exercise in automotive art.CHASSIS NUMBER 4707Chassis number 4707 is recorded on the original factory chassis list, which was published in Joe Sackeys Lamborghini Miura Bible, as having been originally delivered through Lamborauto of Turin on October 7, 1970, and finished in Champagne with a Nero interior. As a very late production S, it was equipped with the most desirable features of ventilated disc brakes and a thicker, strengthened chassis frame, similar to that installed on the later ultimate SV. Importantly, it was also equipped with factory air conditioning, which is always a welcome feature on summer days.According to the documentation on file, the car was imported to the United States in 1984. Until recently, it had remained under the radar while in the small, reclusive private collection of a New Jersey enthusiast, who, according to the earliest title, registration slips, and paperwork on file, had owned it since at least 1988. According to the present owner, the car had last been used in 1996, after which it remained, alongside three or four Ferraris, in the same East Coast garage until the owner acquired it.The owner contacted West Coast Lamborghini specialist Gary Bobileff, who, according to the owner, was sent photographs of the cars chassis plate, chassis stamping, and body stampings, all of which confirmed the car to be very original and in good, genuine order. It is believed that the color change to the present Nero over Champagne interior was undertaken before the car departed to Italy in the early 1980s.The owner notes that a recent compression test shows the compression of all cylinders is between 140 and 150, the oil pressure is good, and the synchromesh is good, except for the synchros in second gear, which are slightly weak. The Miura runs and drives fine otherwise, with the owner noting slight smoke only on the initial start and none while driving. Weve really just dusted it off, the owner recounts, being very careful around the engine bay to leave the original paint on the engine and chassis.This is a wonderful opportunity to acquire a just-found Miura that is fresh for additional recommisioning and ripe for driving enjoyment.

    • Last update: 24 days old

    For sale
  • RM Auctions
    +1 519 352 4575
    see details
  • To be OFFERED AT AUCTION at RMs Arizona event, January 15-16, 2015. To view this car and others currently consigned to this auction, please visit the RM website at rmauctions.com/. Estimate:$2,000,000 - $2,600,000 385 hp, 3,929 cc DOHC transverse V-12 engine, four Weber three-barrel carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, independent front and rear suspension by coil springs and unequal length wishbones, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 98.4 in.One of only a handful of Miuras SVs factory-converted to Jota specifications between 1971 and 1975Fully restored by Gary Bobileff in 2007Ideal for both track days and concours events; equally exciting to drive and stunning to beholdBOB WALLACES DREAM: THE ULTIMATE COMPETITION-READY MIURADespite the otherworldly performance that Lamborghinis Miura offered, none were ever campaigned on the worlds race tracks by the factory or clients. Even though it was designed explicitly as a street-going automobile, the Miura could still handedly keep up with many of its race-bred rivals in terms of performance.Bob Wallace, Lamborghinis chief test driver and road development engineer, knew better than most, that if adapted for use in motorsport, the Miura would be a formidable weapon against Ferraris and Porsches. Wallace had been involved with the design and evolution of the Miura since its early days and knew of its enormous potential better than most. With Lamborghinis factory as his tool, he set out to produce a special race-ready Miura that would hopefully help to bring the company into motorsport.The resulting automobile was dubbed the Jota. It was built in 1970 as a one-off test bed to fit into the FIAs Appendix J (hence Jota), and it was graced with a number of upgrades over the existing Miura S. First and foremost, Wallace chose to use the new-for-1971 SV-spec powertrain with split-sump lubrication. With help from the slightly raised compression, the Jotas engine produced 440 horsepower at 8,000 rpm. Furthermore, the chassis was stiffened, the rear track was widened, the fenders were flared to fit wider rear tires, and the Miuras characteristic headlight eyebrows disappeared. Wallace was also able to achieve a much-improved weight balance by repositioning the fuel tanks in the door sills, rather than in the nose, and the spare tire was fitted just behind the engine.The race-ready nature of the car was clearly evident from just one look at the interior. It was completely stripped out and fitted with Plexiglas windows and a single windshield wiper. One-millimeter-thick chrome-moly steel pipes were welded to the ladder chassis, and aluminum sheet skin was riveted over the chassis, forming an aluminum semi-monocoque shell. Additionally, the entire body was crafted from aluminum (standard Miuras had roofs made of steel). Thanks to its lightweight body and further weight-saving measures applied throughout, the Jota tipped the scales at just 1,784.5 pounds and sat four inches lower than the standard road going Miura.Once the car was complete, it was dispatched on a 20,000-mile road test. After the SV was introduced at the Geneva Salon in 1971, Ferruccio Lamborghini scheduled to have the car scrapped, as he had no interest in competition and saw the SV as superior to the stripped-out SVJ on the street. However, it was reportedly saved from the scrapyard and sold to millionaire Alfredo Belpone in Bresica, Italy, who retained all of its racing modifications. To issue an invoice, the company needed a production certificate, and the Jota was given chassis number 5084, an SV-continuation number. The car was restored with the retention of its racing upgrades and sent to Belpone, but it would not be in his possession for long. According to a research document, the car crashed and burned on a closed autostrada while being tested. The original (and intended to be only) Jota was never rebuilt.Nevertheless, the memory of the ultimate Miura never escaped both Bob Wallace and enthusiasts outside the factory. As word of Wallaces modifications and the SVJ spread, customers began to request similar options and modifications to their cars. Lamborghini obliged, and five (or up to seven, depending on the source) Miura SVJs were built. These cars retained their original interior creature comforts but were modified to receive the body modifications and engine tuning of the SVJ, along with exhaust, suspension, and brake cooling upgrades.CHASSIS NUMBER 4892: A TRUE FACTORY SVJ CONVERSIONPrior to its conversion to Jota specifications, chassis number 4892 was constructed by the factory in July 1971 as a Miura SV that was finished in white with a blue interior. The car remained in Italy and was sold new to a Dr. Alcide, of Rome. It is not known when the conversion was done precisely, but a letter issued by Lamborghini in 1974 listed it as a P400 Miura SV Mod. Jota at that time, which confirms that the conversion was done within three years following its production. Mechanically, chassis number 4892 received slight engine tuning and was fitted with a wet-sump engine. It was refinished red at that time and imported to Japan by Tomita Automobile Inc. The car then passed through two subsequent owners before Kazuo Takahashi restored it in the late 1980s. After moving to the United States in 2007, it was purchased by a collector residing in northeastern Pennsylvania. The Miura was then shown at the 2007 William K. Vanderbilt Jr. Concours dElegance in Newport, Rhode Island, where it earned the Vanderbilt Award.In May 2007, chassis number 4892 was inspected by Claudi Zampolli, a former Lamborghini employee who was in charge of the companys Special Projects Division from 1967 to 1972. Zampolli confirmed in a letter that this particular car has all the correct features of the factory-modified SV-Jotas, furthering the belief that this is one of the true factory-modified cars. It was then decided that the car would be fully restored by Miura expert Gary Bobileff, a process which took two years and cost $225,000. The car was painted its current shade of Rosso Granada following its completion, which was photographically documented every step of the way. Bobileff found this car to be an excellent example of the breed, as it showed no evidence of accident damage and was in excellent mechanical shape even before the restoration.The car was acquired by its current custodian in 2010 and has been sparingly driven and expertly maintained and preserved in his custody. The current owner of this Jota also took the time to research the cars history and contacted Bob Wallace before his passing. Through this interaction, Wallace was able to confirm that the car was indeed converted to Jota specifications at the factory. The car is still in excellent shape both cosmetically and mechanically, and it would be an ideal acquisition for anyone looking for a Miura that would stand out from the rest. Included with the sale of this car is an extensive file containing letters from Automobili Lamborghini, Claudio Zampoli, and Bob Wallace, as well as restoration photos and documents.SVJ-specification Miuras are examples of what could have been had Lamborghini taken Bob Wallaces advice and decided to go racing, and they are without a doubt some of the most interesting cars to have ever left SantAgata. This Miura SVJ, one of only a handful of its kind built as an homage to the original SVJ, would be an ideal entrant for either concours or track events anywhere in the work. As such, it is an important part of Lamborghini history, harkening back to a car that was the pinnacle of Lamborghini engineering and development at its time. Any Miura is a beautiful car to behold, either at a standstill or at speed, and this SVJ takes the revered Miura to the next level.

    • Last update: 24 days old

    For sale
  • RM Auctions
    +1 519 352 4575
    see details
  • £849,995 £849,995

    Although the S version of the Miura came out in 1969, it was not radically different from the original P400. Bob Wallace, Lamborghini's development test driver wanted to explore more of the huge performance potential of the Miura, and built his own test bed car which ended up being brutally fast. This 'Jota' was so cutting-edge that only a small number of the improvements incorporated in it made their way in to the later Miura SV. The Jota was destroyed in 1972 in a crash being driven by someone whose abilities fell far behind the car's. Five production SV's were partially 'Jota-ised' but this was mainly cosmetic. This Miura S was supplied new into Japan and has lived there since. The last (fifth) owner set out to produce a car whose closeness to the original Jota specification was much more than skin deep, and there is a comprehensive photo record and bills on file for over £365,000. This work included producing a set of bespoke hand formed aluminium bodywork with exposed rivets and fitting a specially modified SV engine, as well as a simply stunning ground up restoration. The build quality far exceeds anything produced by the factory in period. Please contact us for details of th

    • Year: 1969

    • Last update: 26 days old

    • Mileage: 1969 mi

    For sale
  • Cheshire Classic Cars
    01244 529500
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  • Needless to say, every great collection must contain a Miura at some point and this example, which is believed to only have 5 owners from new, is accompanied by an excellent history file, has matching numbers status and is in superior condition would make a great choice for any discerning collector.

    • Last update: 2 months old

    • Mileage: 29000 mi

    For sale
  • DK Engineering
    01923 287 687
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  • £999,995 £999,995

    1971 LAMBORGHINI Miura P400 S, 2 Door Coupe, Blu Notte, Nero Leather, previous owners 4, number of keys 2, 28,000 km, We are extremely proud to offer this fabulous Miura for sale, probably the best example of such a car for sale anywhere in the world. Even greatness can be improved upon. In 1968, Lamborghini introduced its updated Miura P400S, which featured a V-12 with revised camshafts that was good for a power output of over 370 horsepower and was mounted on a stiffened chassis. This model was, in turn, followed by the epically exciting, ultimate production Miura, the P400SV, which was first shown at Geneva in 1971. The SV offered even greater performance and improved handling, and it boasted 385 horsepower, with separate lubrication for the engine and gearbox, a limited-slip differential, completely revised suspension, and a leather interior. The rear track was widened five inches, to accommodate wider wheels, which necessitated the Dino-like “flaring” of the rear body panels. Most menacingly of all were the distinctive laid-back headlamps, which lost their “eyelashes” in favour of the masculine plain black surrounds. With a top speed of 180 mph, it is no wonder that numerous o

    • Year: 1976

    • Last update: about 1 month old

    • Mileage: 28000 mi

    For sale
  • Amari Supercars
    01772 663 777
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