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Lamborghini Countach buying guide

Lamborghini Countach Lamborghini Countach Lamborghini Countach Anniversary Lamborghini Countach interior Lamborghini Countach engine Lamborghini Countach Lamborghini Countach Lamborghini Countach badge Even though it’s more than 40 years since the Countach design study made its debut, and with a whole raft of supercars appearing in the meantime, nothing has dulled the impact of perhaps the most brutal car design ever. While the Miura before it was lithe and beautiful, and its successors’ lines are somehow softer yet aggressive, the Countach’s styling is unspeakably savage.

If you’re Piedmontese, the name says it all: Countach! is the exclamation of shock, with no direct translation, uttered by Nuccio Bertone when he first saw the prototype for the Miura replacement. Believe it or not, the Lamborghini Countach was even more outlandish in prototype form than in production guise, and his stunned reaction upon seeing this early design study is completely understandable. The Countach didn’t just move the goalposts, it dispensed with them altogether.

It’s not just the aesthetics that are brutal though; the driving experience can be enough to knock you for six too. The Countach was never meant to be a compromising car, but it was astonishingly focused in terms of dynamics. Performance was always key, whether it was acceleration, cornering, braking or handling. Pirelli even came up with its ultimate performance tyre, the P7, so the Countach could become even more extreme.

It’s now more than two decades since the last Countach was built and, for a while, values were surprisingly low. In recent years they’ve started to climb sharply, though, with purchase costs often only the tip of the iceberg. That’s because these cars can prove fragile, while replacement parts are often eye-wateringly costly.

View from a Countach specialist

Mike Pullen has owned his LP400S for 21 years; along the way he’s had most Countach derivatives. He also runs Lamborghini specialist Carrera Sport, which maintains and restores a whole raft of Countaches for owners around the UK. Pullen comments: ‘In recent years the Countach has shed its medallion-man image, with the cars now seen as genuine classics. As a result, few buyers acquire them for regular use, but many examples were previously bought for this purpose. That’s why you need to check a car’s history carefully. Look for evidence of poor crash repairs as well as mechanicals that are worn out through regular thrashing.’

According to Pullen, the various Countach derivatives are all quite different to drive. Earlier cars are lighter, with more free-revving powerplants. These are the Countaches for purists who probably won’t use the car very much. The Countach got heavier and less tactile to drive as time went on; they also got more usable but less reliable as the complexity increased. What Lamborghini didn’t master throughout Countach production was rust prevention – even Anniversary models can corrode spectacularly if used on salty roads, then stored badly.

Where you buy your Countach is also important, according to Pullen. ‘The Countach is highly prized in North America and mainland Europe – especially in Germany. Asking prices for left-hand-drive cars are much higher there, with right-hand-drive examples more affordable as they’re sought after only in the UK. There are few early cars in the UK but these are the ones that are globally the most collectable.

Lamborghini Countach engine problems

The Countach’s V12 is one of the all-time great powerplants, and it’s pretty much bombproof. It looks great, sounds even better and gives the Countach performance to match the looks – but while it will take hard use in its stride, there’s a limit to how much abuse it can take. Poorly maintained engines don’t last long, so look for evidence of servicing over the years.

Some owners skimp on maintenance because even straightforward tasks can take an age, as there’s 12 of everything. For example, the valve clearances should be checked every 15,000 miles, but as it’s a two-day job (the carbs have to be removed) it’s one that’s often overlooked.

The V12 prefers semi-synthetic lubricants at around £30 for four litres. Even though the sump holds 16 litres, oil consumption shouldn’t be high, so once the fluid has been renewed it shouldn’t need to be topped up much between 6000-mile changes.

There are two oil pipes that run from the radiator at the front to the engine behind the cabin, via the sills. These pipes become porous with age, allowing lubricant to leak onto the right-hand sill. Check for an oily sill and/or puddles of lubricant under the car. Replacing the pipes costs £800.

Misfires are common once an engine bay has been allowed to get damp. It’s usually down to the electronic ignition system, with the Marelli module fitted to 4.8- and 5.2-litre cars a particular problem. Many examples have had a modern replacement by now; if you find a car that’s still got the original system fitted, budget for a new one.

If you’re looking at a 24-valve model, ensure the collar that locates the oil filter paper element is in place. Without it, the element won’t sit properly, allowing dirty oil to bypass it, ultimately ensuring the crankshaft journals are damaged. Once this happens you may get away with machining but you might need a new crankshaft at £4500. If a full engine rebuild is needed, including major bottom-end work, the bill could easily top £12,000.

How about the transmission?

Considering what it has to put up with, the transmission is usually amazingly durable. Unless drivers have been particularly harsh or ham-fisted, it should be in rude health – yet there are some areas that can give problems on high-mileage or really hard-driven cars.

The gearbox itself is strong and unlikely to need attention, but listen out for rumbling that implies bearings are on their way out. While no Countach transmission is quiet as such, one that’s about to self-destruct will be obvious. Major whining means the gears have worn, and replacing these, or the bearings, will mean a major gearbox rebuild, which can cost up to £8000.

It’s possible to eke up to 40,000 miles out of a clutch, but this isn’t common. Drive the car as Lamborghini intended and you’ll be doing well to get 20,000 miles out of a clutch, with replacement starting at £1650 depending on how many parts are needed. The engine has to come out for this job and, because the flywheel is supplied balanced with the cover attached, it’s not unusual to need a four-piece clutch kit (plate, cover, bearing and flywheel). Buy the full kit for an early car and it’s £8283; for an LP5000S it’s £6815 and the QV/Anniversary set is £5288. If a fresh clutch is needed or if the engine has to come out for any reason, the clutch slave cylinder will also need renewing. They’re fragile, and accessibility is a problem, but a new one is just £20.



Suspension, steering and brakes

Stub axles can fracture through ageing and hard use. Cars used regularly on track days are most likely to be affected, and especially on the nearside. Such breakages can be disastrous, so replacing them as a matter of course is a good idea if the originals are still fitted. With fresh bearings the job costs around £600 per side. Rear hubs can also break if the wheels have been heavily kerbed, but they can usually be welded up at £500 or so per side.

The suspension is potentially expensive to rebuild – largely because there are eight rose joints on each side at the rear. The handling deteriorates sharply once wear occurs; the wayward feel will be obvious, with a bill of £1650 likely to put it right.

Rattly suspension often points to worn rose joints, but it can be hard working out which end of the car the noises are emanating from. If you’re lucky, it might just be that the anti-roll bar brackets have worn, but it could also be wear in the rose joints for the anti-roll bars. There are two of these on each side of the bar, 
at each end of the car.

Your final suspension check should be that the tie rods aren’t bent or corroded. The car is often strapped down or jacked up using these, but they’re not designed for that. If bent, they can often be straightened.

The rear discs have separate handbrake calipers, which are prone to seizing. Freeing them off is easy enough but it’s worth checking that the car will roll when the handbrake is released.

The Pirelli P7s fitted to everything except the LP400 are now very hard to find, so Yokohamas or Pirelli P Zeros are the best alternative.

Bodywork, electrics and trim

Let’s start with the good news - all panels are available to revive even the most tired Countach so, no matter how dented or corroded the car is, it can be restored. Carrera Sport remanufactures some panels, while the factory offers just about anything you might need.

The bad news is that there’s a good chance some bodywork repairs will be needed, unless the car has been pampered from new or restored already. The earliest cars are the ones most prone to corrosion; later editions were reasonably well rustproofed, even if they weren’t always that well put together.

At the core of the Countach is a spaceframe chassis, over which are fitted hand-beaten alloy panels. The headlamp pods are steel, though, as are the roof panels. Because the Countach was hand-built, no two bodyshells are exactly alike, so fitting replacement panels is a skilled task.

Corrosion can strike anywhere, but the areas most prone to giving problems are the trailing edges of the front wings, where a steel former is incorporated. The glassfibre mouldings on the sills and wheelarches of later cars can hide corrosion, but this is likely only if the car has been used in salty conditions – in which case the rest of the body will also be the worse for wear.

Accident damage is as likely as corrosion, so look for ripples in the panelwork or indications of filler. Shutlines should be tight and even, and if panels don’t line up it’s likely that the car has been shunted at some point.

Like the bodyshell, the chassis is complex and repairs can be very involved. Corrosion is common as rustproofing was never these cars’ strong point; any fresh metal that’s been let in shouldn’t be immediately obvious – but it frequently is.

Working air-con is essential if you’re not to fry in hot weather, not least because the windows open just a few inches. The heat generated by the engine and transmission, combined with the effect of the sun through the expansive windscreen, ensure the cabin can take on sauna-like qualities. Replacing the various nylon hoses is £750, while for similar money a modern compressor can be installed as well.

The instrumentation and switchgear are reliable and all available and there isn’t much exterior trim to worry about. Retrimming an interior is easy enough. However, check that the windscreen is intact; they’re prone to cracking and replacements, which can be very costly, aren’t always available.

Should you buy a Lamborghini Countach?

For visual drama, no car can match a Countach, whether it’s the earlier, purer design, or the later, bespoilered edition. There are also few cars that can match the financial drama if major work is needed. Buy badly and you could easily end up forking out much more than the car’s value in mechanical and bodywork rebuild costs. The key is to speak to the main specialists, who will know about the best models out there; these cars are rare enough for individual examples to be well known by those in the trade.

Also, don’t wade in without seeing plenty of evidence of major expenditure over as long a period as possible. You can’t run a Countach cheaply, so insist on seeing all the bills to prove the car has been maintained properly, by someone who knows what they’re doing. There are good and bad examples out there, in equal measure. Find one of the former and you’ll find that the Countach is as good to own as it is to look at.

TIMELINE

1971: Countach makes its debut in prototype form at the Geneva Salon, with a 4971cc V12.
1972: Decision is made to put the Countach into production.
1973: Pre-production Countach is shown at the Geneva Salon.
1974: First production-ready Countach is shown, at the Geneva Salon. The first cars are then delivered in the summer. 150 LP400s are built.
1978: LP400S arrives, Pirelli P7 tyres and revised suspension. Periscope roof disappears. 466 are made.
1980: Smaller carbs (40DCOE Webers) to improve driveability. Power is cut to a claimed 353bhp.
1982: LP500S goes on sale, with 4754cc V12 and 45DCOE carbs, raising power back to 375bhp.
1985: Quattrovalvole edition is introduced as LP500S QV. 5167cc powerplant gives 455bhp, with a raised engine cover, wider front tyres and suspension geometry changes. 459 LP500s are made, in various forms.
1988: Anniversary Countach goes on sale, celebrating 25 years of Lamborghini.
1990: Final Countach leaves the line, after 1997 have been made.
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Lamborghini Countach cars for sale

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Lamborghini Countach
249995 299995 GBP
  • The iconic Lamborghini Countach was THE poster car from the seventies and eighties. This outrageously styled car is so different from any other sportscar from that era, that it is a real surprise it took so long to become a top collectors car. Since a couple of years, it has finally received the attention it deserved, and it is now one of the most sought after supercars in the world. No wonder though : with a fantastic mid-mounted Lamborghini V12 engine, and a Marcello Gandini designed body, it is the one and only successor of the illustrious Miura. It was also the first Lamborghini with scissor doors, a styling feature which became a trademark for the sportscar manufacturer of Sant'Agata Bolognese. This example is a rare LP400 S. It was the wilder version of the famous LP400, nowadays also referred to as "Periscopo". The most radical changes were in the exterior, where the tyres were replaced with much wider Pirelli P7 units, and fiberglass wheel arch extensions were added, giving the car the fundamental look it kept until the end of its production run. An optional V-shaped spoiler was available over the rear deck, which improved the high speed stability. An angular "S" was added

    • Year: 1980

    • Last update: 1 day old

    • Mileage: 1426 mi

    For sale
  • Albion Motorcars
    +32 (0)3 765 09 17
    see details
  • To be OFFERED AT AUCTION at Auction Americas Fort Lauderdale event, March 27-29, 2015. Estimate:$350,000 - $400,000 The Lamborghini Countach is perhaps the most iconic supercar of the last 30 years. It decorated the walls of a generation of young car fans in a poster known to most, and it helped define an era of supercar excess. Several decades later, the once cutting edge design may be somewhat dated, but is certainly still the stuff of exotic car dreams for many car aficionados. Anyone with the means to make their aging supercar dreams a reality would be hard pressed to find a nicer example than the one being offered. The Countach made its public debut at the 1971 Geneva Motor Show. The design of the ultra-low two-seater sports car took the world by surprise. Perhaps the most captivating styling elements were the doors opening scissor-style, swinging up and forward. Over the years these famous doors have become a consistent Lamborghini design feature. The Bertone-designed legend grew ever more extravagant as engineers sought various measures aimed at keeping it pinned to the road in response to the ever-increasing power output from its refined V-12 powertrain. Bored-out to 5.2-liters for 1985, the V-12 was also given four valves per cylinder, for a total of 48, hence the moniker Quattrovalvole. European-specification Countach models gained six Weber downdraft carburetors located on the top of the engine, rather than from the side, while North American models received Bosch's K-Jetronic fuel injection system. The V-12 engine is paired with a five-speed manual transmission. The shift mechanism is gated for smooth and accurate gear changes that are essential for maximizing the cars speed potentials. The Countach Quattrovalvole received small bodywork changes in late 1987; new streaked sills incorporating rear brake cooling vents were added. The interior was now equipped with central-locking, modified heater controls and much improved ventilation. The huge rear wing could still be ordered on the Quattrovalvole, and few Countach left the factory without one. The truth is that the Countach does not suffer from aerodynamic lift at high speeds, so the rear wing was not a necessity, but added a great deal of conversation to the design and the car being immediately recognizable to all but a few. The wing was an expensive option at about US $5,000, but with the increased drag created a slightly lower top speed. This exhilarating car has enjoyed same family ownership since new and is presented in original condition. Attractively equipped with the appropriate factory phone dial-style alloy wheels and functional tall rear spoiler, the Lamborghini is finished in a fittingly sinister black presentation with an exquisite biscuit-toned leather interior. This example is reported to be exceptional and very sparingly used and displays as-new condition inside and out. Equipment includes air conditioning, Alpine AM/FM stereo radio with cassette, tinted glass, remote mirrors, driving lights and power four-wheel disc brakes. Its extraordinarily preserved condition invites closer inspection. It is accompanied by its books that include warranty and maintenance books, with the Retail Sales Certificate still in the back. Additionally there is the drivers handbook, owners manual and parts catalog binder. Documentation includes the original window sticker and service record from October 1989, as well as September, October and December of 2008. This magnificent Countach is prepared to be enjoyed by the next owner seeking the sweet symphony only a Lamborghini V-12 can provide.

    • Last update: 5 days old

    For sale
  • Auctions America
    +1 260 927 9797
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  • To be OFFERED AT AUCTION at RMs Paris event, February 4, 2015. To view this car and others currently consigned to this auction, please visit the RM website at rmauctions.com/Paris. Estimate:$1,130,000 - $1,450,000 375 bhp, 3,929 cc DOHC 60-degree V-12 engine with six Weber twin-choke 45 DCOE carburettors, five-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent suspension coil springs with telescopic shock absorbers, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,450 mm.The most desirable Countach; one of 150 Periscopio cars producedFour owners and 57,843 kilometres (less than 35,000 miles) from newAn original factory RHD example, delivered new to AustraliaTo many enthusiasts and automakers, concept cars are considered a tease and nothing more. Meant to stimulate the public and show vehicles that could be rather than will be in the future, they are intended to provide a study in the evolution of a given brands design language. Far too often, concepts with radical, show-stopping designs do not make their way to production, as they were often halted by the bean-counters in fear that the costs will be far too great. Certain styling cues might see the light of day further down the road, but seldom does an entire automobile make its way from concept to production largely intact. This is not so with the Lamborghini Countach. The design language on the prototype Countach LP500 was designed to shock and awe the motoring press and public alike at the 1971 Geneva Motor Show. Breath-taking just barely described Marcello Gandinis design for Bertone, and it was nothing short of spectacular. Angular, low slung, and aggressive, the Countach was the antithesis of the curvaceous automobiles designed in the 1960s. When the production version arrived three years after at the 1974 Geneva Auto Show, the car was clearly more refined and ready for road use. Production was slow at first, with only 23 examples being produced that first year, but Lamborghini slowly began to hit its stride in later years, with many more leaving the factory gates as the cars life went on. Whilst the styling of the LP400 remained largely unchanged from the original concept, numerous changes were made under the skin to the chassis and drivetrain. The tube-frame chassis was completely redesigned to provide greater strength, and the cooling system saw a similar level of revision, as it now utilized vertically mounted radiators which funnelled air through a pair of scoops and NACA ducts. Meanwhile, the engine was reduced in size to a more reliable 4.0-litre unit with a smaller bore and stroke than the original 5-litre V-12. Topped with six weber carburettors, the Countach produced 375 horsepower at 8,000 rpm. Thanks to a total weight of 1,065 kilograms and its incredibly slick aerodynamic silhouette, the car was capable of a top speed a hair under 290 km/h, and it was thought that it could soldier on to crack 300 km/h in ideal conditions.According to the factory records, chassis 1120260 was completed on 2 June 1977 and finished in Rosso with a Tobacco interior. The car currently has a Nero interior, which is understood to be original and how the car was delivered new.This Periscopio was ordered through Australian importer Tony de Fina, who organised for the first owners to collect it directly from the Lamborghini factory in SantAgata Bolognese. It has a rich and fascinating history file, with documentation dating back to November 1976, when the original owners of the car got wind of the imminent release of the LP400S and wanted to cancel their order for the LP400! This did not happen, and the owners collected their new car on 2 June 1977, immediately got behind the wheel, and proceeded to go on a grand tour of Europe. Two weeks later, the car returned to the factory for a routine service with 3,449 kilometres on the odometer! Its first owners continued to enjoy the car in Europe and the UK for several months, and after a service in June 1978 in the UK, with 16,276 kilometres showing on its odometer, the car was shipped to Australia, where it would call home for the next 36 years. Shortly after returning to Australia, the car was converted to LP400S specification by the local New South Wales Lamborghini distributor by flaring the wheel arches and fitting LP400S Bravo style wheels, a front spoiler, and a rear wing. The cars current and fourth owner purchased the car in September 2005 and immediately commissioned the car to be returned to its original LP400 guise, save for the upgraded rear suspension.The car was repainted in its correct shade of Rosso, whilst the engine was rebuilt almost two decades ago. However, the car remains in remarkably original condition, retaining what is understood to be its original interior. Today, the car presents and drives magnificently, and it would be one of the finest surviving examples of the early Countach. The car is not a trailer queen and has been driven and enjoyed on the road throughout the last 10 years, although its condition would suggest otherwise. Attesting to the cars quality and condition, it was invited to be part of the Lamborghini 50th Anniversary display at Motorclassica in Melbourne in October 2013, where it was an award winner. The car is accompanied by its tool roll and an extensive history file, including its owners manual, original warranty card, and delivery documents, which only add to the provenance of this extraordinary Countach.The LP400 Periscopio, undoubtedly the most collectible model of the entire Countach family, was a legend in its own time when it was introduced, and it remains amongst the most historically important supercars ever built. It proved that Lamborghini was not just a one-hit wonder after the Miura, and it could continue to evolve and compete alongside more established sports car manufacturers, like Porsche and Ferrari, establishing the companys place in the market for years to come. Perhaps Ray Hutton of Autocar magazine summed up the brutish charm of the Countach most accurately in his article on the car in 1974: The people who live in the outskirts of Modena are used to seeing exotic cars on test. But this one still makes them stop in their tracks, smile, and wave in encouragement".Boasting known ownership history from new, as well as the provenance of being one of only a handful of right-hand-drive LP400 Periscopio cars ever built, this is a Countach to be treasured.Moteur V-12 60 degrs de 3 929 cm3 2 ACT par banc, 375 ch, six carburateurs double corps 45 DCOE, bote de vitesses manuelle cinq rapports, suspensions avant et arrire indpendantes, ressorts hlicodaux et amortisseurs tlescopiques, quatre freins disque ventil. Empattement: 2 450 mm La plus dsirable des Countach, une des 150 Periscopio produites Quatre propritaires et 57 843 km au total Un exemplaire volant droite dorigine, vendu neuf en AustralieAux yeux de nombreux passionns et de constructeurs, les concept cars sont considrs tout au plus comme des stimulants. Destins attirer le public et montrer des vhicules qui pourraient exister plus que des modles futurs, ils sont conus pour figer une tude au cours de lvolution du vocabulaire du style dune marque donne. Bien trop souvent, les concepts dots dun style radical et sidrant ne parviennent pas au stade de la production du fait de lintervention des contrleurs de gestion effrays par une possible augmentation excessive des prix de revient. Quelques dtails de style peuvent se retrouver sur la route un jour, mais il est rare quune voiture complte passe du concept la production en grande srie sans de profondes modifications. Tel ne fut pas le cas de la Lamborghini Countach.Le vocabulaire stylistique de la Countach LP500 prototype avait pour but de choquer et de fasciner la presse automobile comme le public du salon de Genve 1971. couper le souffle suffit dcrire le dessin de Marcello Gandini pour Bertone et il avait tout pour tonner. Anguleuse, plus que basse et agressive, la Countach tait lantithse des voitures tout en courbes conues dans les annes 1960. Lorsque la version de production apparut trois ans aprs, au salon de Genve 1974, la voiture avait t visiblement raffine et adapte la route. La production fut lente au dbut avec 23 exemplaires seulement la premire anne, mais Lamborghini monta doucement en cadence et de plus en plus de voitures quittrent lusine au fil des annes de vie de la voiture.Si le style de la LP400 demeura trs proche de celui du concept original, de nombreux changements furent introduits sur le chssis et la transmission. Le chssis en treillis tubulaire fut totalement redessin en faveur dune plus grande robustesse et le systme de refroidissement fut galement revu avec adoption de radiateurs verticaux qui canalisaient lair travers une paire dcopes et des prises NACA.Paralllement, le moteur fut rduit un groupe plus fiable de 4 litres par diminution de lalsage et de la course par rapport au V-12 de 5 litres original. Coiff par six carburateurs Weber, le moteur Countach dlivrait 375 ch 8 000 tr/min. Grce un poids total de 1 065 kg et une silhouette arodynamique bien lisse, la voiture pouvait atteindre une vitesse peine infrieure 290 km/h tout en laissant penser quelle pouvait dpasser 300 km/h dans des conditions favorables.Selon les archives de lusine, chassis 1120260 propose fut acheve le 2 juin 1977, peinte en Rosso (rouge) avec intrieur tabac. La voiture a maintenant un intrieur Nero (noir) qui serait dorigine et tel quil habillait la voiture livre neuve.Cette Periscopio fut commande via limportateur australien Tony de Fina qui fit en sorte que les premiers propritaires eussent la possibilit den prendre livraison lusine Lamborghini de SantAgata Bolognese. Elle est complte dun riche et fascinant dossier historique comprenant une documentation qui remonte novembre 1976 lorsque les premiers propritaires de la voiture apprenant la sortie imminente du modle LP400 S voulurent annuler leur ordre concernant la LP400 ! Ce ne fut pas possible et les propritaires prirent livraison de la voiture neuve le 2 juin 1977 et, aussitt au volant, entreprirent une grande tourne europenne. Deux semaines plus tard, la voiture revint lusine pour un entretien de routine avec 3 449 km au compteur. Ses premiers propritaires continurent den profiter en Europe et au Royaume-Uni pendant quelques mois et, aprs un entretien en juin 1978 au Royaume-Uni 16 276 km/h, la voiture fut embarque pour lAustralie o elle allait passer 36 ans.Peu aprs son arrive en Australie, la voiture fut porte aux spcifications LP400 S par le distributeur local Lamborghini des Nouvelles Galles du Sud qui largit les ailes et monta les roues style Bravo de la LP400 S, un spoiler frontal et un aileron arrire. Le propritaire actuel, le quatrime, acheta la voiture en septembre 2005 et demanda immdiatement quelle ft remise dans sa configuration originale LP400, exception faite des suspensions arrires amliores.La voiture fut repeinte dans la teinte Rosso originale, tandis que le moteur avait t refait il y avait prs de vingt ans. Mais elle est reste dans un tat dorigine remarquable en conservant ce qui est vu comme son intrieur dorigine. Actuellement, la voiture qui se prsente et fonctionne excellemment serait une des plus belles Countach de la premire srie. Elle ne connat pas les remorques porte-voiture et elle a t apprcie sur les routes au cours des dix dernires annes, ce que son tat exceptionnel ne permet pas de deviner. Preuve de la qualit et de ltat de la voiture, elle a t invite participer lexposition du 50e anniversaire de Lamborghini au Motorclassica de Melbourne en octobre 2013 o elle reut un prix. Elle est accompagne de sa trousse doutillage et dun copieux dossier historique avec le manuel de lutilisateur, la carte de garantie originale et les documents de livraison qui ne font quajouter lexcellente provenance de cette extraordinaire Countach.Sans aucun doute, le modle le plus collectionnable de toute la famille Countach, la LP400 Periscopio fut une lgende au temps de son introduction et elle demeure parmi les supercars historiquement les plus importantes jamais produites. Elle dmontra que Lamborghini ne fut pas seulement lauteur dun fabuleux coup unique avec la Miura, mais quil allait poursuivre son volution et concurrencer des constructeurs de voitures de sport plus chevronns comme Porsche ou Ferrari, en simposant sur le march au fil des annes venir. Ray Hutton du magazine Autocar a peut-tre rsum le plus exactement possible le charme brut de la Countach dans un article de 1974 : Les gens qui habitent aux alentours de Modne sont habitus voir dtranges voitures en essai. Mais celle-ci les cloue encore sur place et dclenche sourires et saluts dencouragement .Bnficiant dune histoire continue depuis sa sortie dusine comme de lavantage de faire partie de la poigne de LP400 Periscopio conduite droite, cest coup sr une Countach conserver prcieusement.

    • Last update: 16 days old

    For sale
  • RM Auctions
    +1 519 352 4575
    see details
  • To be OFFERED AT AUCTION at RMs Paris event, February 4, 2015. To view this car and others currently consigned to this auction, please visit the RM website at rmauctions.com/Paris. Estimate:$500,000 - $700,000 375 bhp, 3,929 cc DOHC V-12 engine with six twin-throat Weber carburettors, five-speed manual transmission, unequal length A-arm front suspension with coil springs and an anti-roll bar, upper lateral-link rear suspension with lower A-arms, coil springs, and an anti-roll bar, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,450 mm.One of 105 Countach LP400S Series II examples builtOne of three Countaches upgraded by Bob Wallace with twin turbochargers in periodIncludes original matching-numbers engineServiced and fitted with a new interior by Gary BobileffThe second iteration of Lamborghinis iconic Countach was the LP400S, and it was unveiled at the Geneva Salon in 1974, just four years after the original premiered at the same show. Even though the public had become accustomed to Marcello Gandinis wild and outlandish design, the LP400S was just as exciting to behold on the stand at Geneva as the original prototype and its first road going predecessor. Almost at the moment the car was announced, numerous existing and new Lamborghini customers expressed their interest in the newest car, seeking to have the latest and greatest example of the wildest road-legal car available for sale. The LP400S, keeping all the flair and personality that made the original Countach so exciting, sought to not change what worked but rather introduce improvements that would make the car a better platform overall. The most apparent change to the car was that it was fitted with even wider Pirelli tyres, which helped to put the cars 375 horsepower to the ground. In order to accept these tyres, the Countach required further modifications, including a completely revised suspension geometry to account for the change in tyre width and wheel size. The bodywork was also fitted with muscular yet subtle flares to house said wheels and tyres. The LP400S obviously resonated with Lamborghinis clientele, as many LP400 customers requested that dealers or the factory make LP400S-esque updates available to their cars to keep them as current and up to date as possible. Performance still remained on-par with the cars stellar looks, and the LP400S had a top speed quoted at 179.8 mph.Today, the 237 production examples of the Countach LP400S are easily divisible into three distinct series, which are based on different modifications and upgrades added to the car throughout the production run. The Series II cars, of which 105 were produced, are most easily identified by their smooth-finished concave wheels, and they also retain the low-body suspension setting of the Series I cars. The Countach offered here boasts a story almost more interesting than the car itself. Chassis number 1121254, a 1980 LP400S Series II, was originally delivered to John Robertson, of Kalispell, Montana, in the United States, and at that time, it was finished in white with a black interior. Robertson was known for extensively modifying his cars to increase their performance, as he was a man with an unquenchable need for speed, and his Countach would share garage space with a highly modified Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona. Robertsons new Countach would be no exception to this rule, and it would receive a plethora of upgrades to make it arguably one of the fastest street-legal automobiles on the road.Upon taking delivery of the Countach, Robertson immediately had the car shipped to ex-Lamborghini engineer and test-driver Bob Wallace. He was an individual who was intimately familiar with extracting all possible performance out of the cars from SantAgata and was even credited as the man behind such incredible Lamborghinis as the Miura Jota and the Jarama "Bob". Whilst Ferruccio Lamborghini never fully appreciated Wallaces desire to go racing, many of Lamborghinis customers did, and after departing Lamborghini in 1975, he opened up his own shop. At the time, Wallace was located in Phoenix, Arizona, and Robertson commissioned him to fit the cars 4.0-litre V-12 with twin turbochargers, as well as upgrade the brakes to ensure its increased performance could be reeled in as fast as it could be unleashed. The body was also modified by fitting additional vents to the engine cover, which would assist with keeping the engine bay cool with all of the extra power. The car is photographed at Wallaces facilities in Pete Lyons The Complete Book of Lamborghini, and it is noted as being one of three cars upgraded by Wallace with turbochargers. Even though his new car had been updated to produce massive amounts of power, this still did not quench Robertsons thirst for power and uncompromised performance. The owner further increased the boost on his turbochargers, resulting in the engine continuing to blow its head-gaskets. This matching-numbers engine is included in the sale and is believed to be serviceable. The car was returned to Wallace for an engine rebuild, at which point he decided that the performance Robertson sought could be achieved through different means than turbochargers. At this time, the Countach Quattrovavle had been introduced, and Wallace thought that their powerplant would be suitable for many upgrades. After sourcing an engine from an LM002, Wallace removed the stroker plates, bored the engine, and fitted custom cranks and camshafts. A triple-disk clutch was installed to improve shifting, as were upgraded brakes, a custom intake manifold, a custom exhaust, a MSD ignition, and a complete fire control system, creating what would have undoubtedly been the ultimate Countach in anyones opinion. Pleased with the results, the Countach returned to Montana with Robertson, where it would remain until 2005. After the car was sold from Robertsons estate following his passing, the Countach moved further north to David Kean, of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. At that time, Kean sent the car to noted Lamborghini specialist Gary Bobileff, who installed a new white interior and completed other minor service work, which included overhauling the carburettors, installing electric side-view mirrors, replacing the ignition coils, and fitting new rubber around the windshield. After departing from Keans ownership shortly thereafter, the Countach was shipped to Europe, where it resides today. Its important to note that the car is offered with a large complement of parts, most notably its original V-12 engine, which has a set of turbochargers and intercoolers from Robertsons ownership.With early Countach models gaining steam in the collector car market, the LP400S has become extremely desirable to collectors. These cars retained all the characteristic charm of the earliest Periscopo models whilst also introducing a few subtle updates, and they have proven to be just as exciting to drive as they are to look at. This particular Countach is no exception. This car boasts a fascinating early history that involves one of the most important men in the history of Lamborghini, and it would be an exciting acquisition for the individual looking for a Countach that stands out from the rest.Moteur V-12 2 ACT par banc, 3 929 cm3, 375 ch, six carburateurs Weber double corps, bote de vitesses manuelles cinq rapports, suspension avant par triangles ingaux superposs, ressorts hlicodaux et barre antiroulis, suspension arrire par bras latraux suprieurs et triangles infrieurs, ressorts hlicodaux et barre antiroulis ; quatre freins disque. Empattement: 2 450 mm Une des 105 Countach LP400 S Srie II construites Une des trois Countach modifies lpoque par Bob Wallace avec deux turbos Numros de moteur concordants (matching numbers) et dorigine Entretenue et pourvue dun intrieur neuf par Gary BobileffLa deuxime itration de lemblmatique Countach de Lamborghini, la LP400 S fut dvoile au salon de Genve de 1974, quatre ans aprs seulement le lancement de loriginal au mme endroit. Mme si le public stait habitu au dessin trange et percutant de Marcello Gandini, la LP400 S fut tout aussi excitante contempler sur le stand du salon que le prototype original et la premire routire prcdente. Presque au moment de lannonce de cette voiture, de nombreux clients anciens et nouveaux de Lamborghini exprimrent leur intrt envers la nouvelle voiture en essayant dobtenir sans tarder la version la plus rcente et la plus prestigieuse de la plus sauvage des voitures de route disponibles sur le march.Toujours dote du caractre et de la personnalit qui avaient rendu la Countach si excitante, la LP400 S ne cherchait pas changer ce qui avait fonctionn, mais introduisait des amliorations qui devaient faire globalement de la voiture une machine plus efficace. Le changement le plus apparent sur la voiture concernait le montage de pneus Pirelli encore plus larges capables de passer la route les 375 ch de la machine. Pour pouvoir adopter des pneus de cette taille, la Countach avaient demand dautres modifications dont une gomtrie de suspension totalement rvise en fonction de la nouvelle dimension des roues et des pneus. La carrosserie reut aussi des carnages musculeux, mais subtils, pour loger ces nouveaux quipements. Vibrant en phase avec la clientle de Lamborghini, de nombreux possesseurs de LP400 demandrent que les concessionnaires ou lusine portassent leur voiture aux spcifications LP400 S afin de les maintenir niveau, sinon lavant-garde. Les performances demeuraient la hauteur de laspect intersidral de la voiture et la LP400 S atteignait en pointe prs de 290 km/h.Aujourdhui, les 237 exemplaires de srie de la Countach LP400 S sont aisment divisibles en trois sries distinctes sur la base des diffrentes modifications et amliorations introduites sur la voiture tout au long de sa priode de production. Les voitures de la srie II, produites 105 exemplaires, sont facilement identifiables par leurs roues concaves trs lisses et lassiette surbaisse des voitures de la srie I.La Countach offerte ici possde un historique presque plus intressant que celui du modle lui-mme. La chssis n 1121254, une LP400 S Srie II de 1980, fut initialement livre John Robertson de Kalispell, Montana, USA, peinte en blanc avec intrieur noir. Personnage connu pour sa soif de vitesse inextinguible, il tait aussi clbre pour procder de profondes modifications de ses voitures en vue damliorer leurs performances. Sa Countach devait partager son garage avec une Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona trs modifie. La nouvelle Countach de Robertson nallait pas faire exception cette rgle et recevrait une borde damliorations destines en faire une des plus rapides voitures street legal sur la route.Ds la livraison de la Countach, Robertson fit immdiatement expdier la voiture chez lancien ingnieur et pilote essayeur de Lamborghini, Bob Wallace. Personnage intimement associ toutes les tentatives dextraction de performances maximales sur les voitures de SantAgata, Wallace fut crdit de la cration de ces incroyables Lamborghini que furent la Miura Jota et la Jarama Bob . Si Ferruccio Lamborghini ne cda jamais son envie de sengager en comptition, de nombreux clients de Lamborghini le firent et, aprs son dpart de chez Lamborghini en 1975, il ouvrit son propre atelier de prparation. lpoque, Wallace tait install Phoenix, Arizona, et Robertson chargea Wallace dinstaller sur la voiture un moteur V-12 de 4 litres nourri par deux turbocompresseurs ainsi que damliorer les freins pour que le supplment de performance puisse tre contrl aussi vite quil tait dchan. La carrosserie fut aussi modifie de faon installer des prises d air supplmentaires sur le capot afin de limiter llvation de temprature dans le compartiment moteur malgr le surcrot de puissance. La voiture, photographie chez Wallace dans louvrage de Pete Lyons, The Complete Book of Lamborghini, est indique comme tant une des trois voitures dotes par Wallace de turbocompresseurs. Malgr lnorme puissance confre sa nouvelle voiture, la soif de Robertson pour les chevaux et les performances ne fut pas teinte pour autant. Le propritaire augmenta rgulirement la pression dadmission fournie par les turbos et le moteur continua de claquer tout aussi rgulirement ses joints de culasse. Ce moteur numros concordants qui fait partie du lot est estim rparable.La voiture revint chez Wallace pour une reconstruction du moteur et, ce stade, Wallace estima que les performances voulues par Robertson pouvaient re obtenues par dautres moyens que la suralimentation par turbos. cette poque, la Countach Quattrovalvole avait t introduite et Wallace pensa que le groupe tait susceptibles de supporter de nouvelles amliorations. Aprs avoir obtenu le moteur dun LM002, Wallace dmonta les semelles dpaisseur et ralsa le moteur avant dy installer un vilebrequin et des arbres cames sur mesures . Un embrayage trois disques fut install pour faciliter la slection, puis des freins renforcs, une tubulure dadmission amliore, un chappement spcial, un allumage MSD et un systme complet dextincteur pour la touche finale, crant ainsi ce qui pouvait passer comme lultime Countach aux yeux de lopinion. Ravi du rsultat, Robertson ramena la Countach au Montana o elle demeura jusquen 2005.Aprs la vente de la Countach, conscutive au dcs de Robertson, par les hritiers, la voiture monta vers le nord chez David Kean de Calgary, dans lAlberta au Canada. cette poque, Kean envoya la voiture au rput spcialiste Lamborghini Gary Bobileff qui lui offrit un intrieur blanc tout neuf et effectua quelques mises au point dont la rvision des carburateurs, la pose de rtroviseurs extrieurs lectriques, le remplacement des bobines dallumage et du joint caoutchouc du pare-brise. Aprs son dpart de chez Kean peu de temps aprs, la Countach fut expdie en Europe o elle rside aujourdhui. Il est important de noter que la voiture est offerte avec un gros stock de pices, la plus intressante tant son moteur V-12 original avec son jeu de turbocompresseurs et ses changeurs du temps de Robertson.La cote des premiers modles de Countach montant rgulirement sur le march de la collection, la LP400 S est devenue une voiture des plus recherches. Conservant tout le charme caractristique des premires Periscopo tout en apportant quelques discrtes mises jour, ces voitures ont montr quelles taient aussi passionnantes piloter qu regarder. Cette Countach bien spciale ne fait pas exception.Riche dune histoire ancienne fascinante impliquant lun des hommes les plus importants de lhistoire de Lamborghini, cette voiture constitue une excitante possibilit dacquisition pour le connaisseur qui recherche une Countach pas comme les autres.

    • Last update: 16 days old

    For sale
  • RM Auctions
    +1 519 352 4575
    see details
  • To be OFFERED AT AUCTION at RMs Paris event, February 4, 2015. To view this car and others currently consigned to this auction, please visit the RM website at rmauctions.com/Paris. Estimate:$250,000 - $300,000 449 bhp, 5,167 cc V-12 engine with six Weber carburettors, five-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent suspension with coil springs and telescopic shock absorbers, and four-wheel Girling ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,450 mm.Fewer than 8,000 kilometres from newRecently and thoroughly serviced, including a complete engine overhaulThe most refined and driveable iteration of the legendary CountachIn celebration of the companys 25th anniversary, Lamborghini released a further updated and slightly restyled version of its celebrated Countach. It was unveiled at the 1988 Italian Grand Prix at Monza and would become, to many, the most desirable iteration of the car. With almost 500 subtle changes over its predecessor, the 5000 QV, the new Countach retained the same striking visual panache and incredible performance that Lamborghinis customers had come to know and love. Although the full complement of updates are far too numerous to iterate here in full, the 25th Anniversary Countachs bodywork was redesigned by none other than Horacio Pagani. He lifted the nose slightly and fitted updated and more harmonious bumpers in the front and rear. The two most noticeable exterior changes were to the air intakes located just behind the doors, which received thicker strakes in body colour, rather than in black, and the wheels, which were now two-piece forged alloy units. Inside, the door panels were revised and the manual window cranks were replaced with power-operated switches. The seats also received welcome electric updates and now boasted power adjustable seat backs, making them markedly more comfortable than the seats in any previous Countach. Of course, the performance of the 25th Anniversary edition remained just as exciting as its design. A sprint from 0 to 100 km/h took 4.7 seconds, leading the car onwards towards a top speed of 295 km/h. Overall, these variants are known to be the most driveable, reliable, and comfortable of the series.This 25th Anniversary Countach was produced in December 1989 and finished by the factory in Red with a champagne interior, just as it survives today. It was delivered new to its first owner in Monaco, which is an appropriate locale for such an eye-catching automobile, and it was optioned with factory-supplied sport seats via special order. The service book is stamped in 1991 from Vintage Automobile, Garage Melchiorre, the factory-authorised distributor for Monte Carlo and the original selling agency. Circa 1993, it was sold to its long-term German owner, who kept it stored on an upper floor of his private collection, which included many low-mileage original cars. With just under 8,000 original kilometres on its odometer, this car is surely one of the lowest-mileage examples extant, and it is in glorious condition, with no evidence of damage repair since new. Long-term storage concerns were recently rectified with a mechanical refreshment, which included a complete professional engine overhaul, and the Countach is reported to run well in all respects.According to its owner, a well-known Lamborghini expert, it was shown recently to legendary Lamborghini test driver Valentino Balboni, who remarked that it was one of the most original and correct he could recall. It is offered complete with an original service manual, warranty card, leather pouch, and books. The 25th Anniversary edition was perhaps the most memorable and widely recognised Countach, and it is fondly remembered by enthusiasts for not only its signature style but also the welcome updates that it brought to the 15-year-old Countach platform. The Countach is a styling icon of the 1980s, and it still commands attention and respect wherever it travels today. This pristine, low-mileage example surely wont disappoint.Moteur V-12 2 ACT par banc, 5 167 cm3, 449 ch, six carburateurs double corps Weber, bote de vitesses manuelle cinq rapports, suspensions avant et arrire indpendantes ressorts hlicodaux et amortisseurs tlescopiques ; quatre freins disque ventil Girling. Empattement: 2 450 mm Moins de 8 000 km depuis lorigine Rcemment et totalement revue y compris une rvision du moteur La version la plus raffine et la plus agrable piloter de la lgendaire CountachPour clbrer son 25e anniversaire, Lamborghini sortit une version modernise et lgrement redessine de sa clbre Countach. Dvoile au Grand Prix dItalie Monza en 1988, cette voiture allait vite devenir pour beaucoup la version, la plus dsirable de ce modle mythique. Avec prs de 500 subtils changements par rapport sa devancire, la 5000 QV, la nouvelle Countach conservait toute sa puissance dimpact visuel et les performances incroyables que les clients de Lamborghini avaient appris connatre et savourer.Si lensemble des modernisations est bien trop important pour tre dtaill ici, la carrosserie de la Countach 25e Anniversaire fut redessine par Horacio Pagani lui-mme. Il releva lgrement le nez et installa des pare-chocs avant et arrire plus modernes et plus intgrs. Les deux changements extrieurs les plus notables affectrent les prises dair situes derrire les portes qui reurent des entres agrandies de la teinte de la caisse au lieu du noir et les roues dsormais forges en deux pices en alliage lger. lintrieur, les contre-portes furent retouches et les manivelles de lve-glace furent remplaces par des contacteurs lectriques. Les siges furent dots de rglages lectriques longtemps attendus avec des dossiers inclinables lectriquement qui se rvlrent bien plus confortables que les siges de nimporte quelle Countach antrieure. Naturellement, les performances de ldition 25e Anniversaire taient aussi intressantes que le style. Lacclration de 0 100 km/h demandait 4, 7 secondes avant de mener la voiture jusqu 295 km/h. Plus important, ces variantes sont rputes tre les Countach les plus agrables piloter, les plus fiables et les plus confortables.Produite en dcembre 1989, cette Countach 25e Anniversaire sortit dusine peinte en rouge avec intrieur champagne telle quelle est de nos jours. Livre neuve son premier propritaire Monaco, endroit idal pour une automobile aussi captivante, elle fut quipe en option dusine de siges sport sur commande spciale. Le carnet dentretien est marqu du tampon de Vintage Automobile Garage Melchiorre, concessionnaire agr par lusine pour Monte Carlo et agence de vente lorigine. Vers 1993, elle fut vendue un Allemand qui la conserva longtemps stocke en tage au sein de sa collection prive qui comprenait de nombreuses voitures dorigine faible kilomtrage. En superbe tat et avec moins de 8 000 km au compteur depuis lorigine, cest coup sr lun des exemplaires de ce modle en existence ayant le plus faible kilomtrage et exempt de toutes traces de rparation. Les problmes rsultant dun stockage prolong ont t rcemment traits avec une rvision mcanique comprenant une rvision du moteur effectue par un professionnel et la Countach est rpute fonctionner parfaitement tous points de vue.Selon son propritaire, spcialiste rput de Lamborghini, elle a t montre rcemment au lgendaire essayeur de la marque, Valentino Balboni qui reconnut quil sagissait de lune des voitures les plus originales et correctes quil et jamais examines. Elle est offerte avec ses manuels dorigine, son carnet dentretien, sa carte de garantie et une trousse en cuir.Sans doute la Countach la plus mmorable et la plus clbre de toute la ligne, la 25e Anniversaire est chaleureusement salue par les passionns non seulement pour son style propre, mais aussi pour les modernisations attendues introduites sur un chssis de 15 ans dge. Icne parfaite des annes 1980, la Countach impose toujours lattention et le respect o quelle apparaisse aujourdhui et ce magnifique exemplaire qui a peu roul ne saurait dcevoir son propritaire.

    • Last update: 16 days old

    For sale
  • RM Auctions
    +1 519 352 4575
    see details
  • To be OFFERED AT AUCTION at RMs Arizona event, January 15-16, 2015. To view this car and others currently consigned to this auction, please visit the RM website at rmauctions.com/. Estimate:$400,000 - $600,000 420 bhp, 5,167 cc DOHC V-12 engine with Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent suspension with coil springs and telescopic shock absorbers, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96.5 in.Two owners and under 600 kilometers from newFinished in the highly desirable Nero over Nero with gold wheelsPerhaps one of the finest Countaches extantCalling the Lamborghini Countach groundbreaking would be an understatement. It has been one of the most recognizable cars of its time since leaving the crowd at the 1971 Geneva Auto Show flabbergasted upon its unveiling. The Miura, the predecessor to the Countach, set the industry standard for supercars when it was introduced, and the Countach showed that Lamborghini still had one more trick up its sleeve. Just like the Miura, there was nothing on sale at the time that came close to the Countach in terms of visual appeal or overall automotive panache, and it was destined to become a future classic.Marcello Gandinis angular design typified the design language of the 1980s nearly 10 years in advance. The car was highlighted by its eye-catching, upward-hinged scissor doors, and every inch of it was designed with show-stopping visual appeal in mind. For those who could afford it and were looking to stand out from the crowd, it was the perfect automobile, as it was eye-catching and jaw-dropping in every way. While the Countachs design seemingly evolved constantly over the cars 16-year lifespan, it was always instantly recognizable and just as desirable as the day the cover was lifted off the Geneva show car in 1971.Fourteen years after the introduction of the initial Countach, in March 1985, Lamborghini returned to the Geneva Auto Show in to introduce the third iteration of the Countach, the QV, which was named for its four valve heads. The cars V-12 featured an increase in cubic displacement to 5,167 cubic centimeters, and the compression ratio was increased to 9.5:1. This brought horsepower to 420 at 7,000 rpm for the fuel-injected models, increasing power by 45 brake horsepower over the outgoing LP5000S Countach. Cosmetically, the Countach remained largely unchanged, with the only change being to the rocker panels, where vents were added to extract air for the rear brakes.This particular Countach, a 1988 5000 QV, was produced in February 1988 as a U.S.-specification model. It had Bosch fuel injection, was finished in Nero over a Nero leather interior, and had optional gold wheels and the iconic rear spoiler, just as it is seen here today. The car was immaculately preserved by its first owner for over 30 years, and then, in 2011, it was purchased by its second and current owner, showing just 520 kilometers on its odometer. Since then, the car has been the owners prized possession, and he made it his mission to preserve it in the very original condition in which he purchased it. As such, it has only been run and driven to ensure the functionality of the drivetrain and has only accumulated less than 100 kilometers in his ownership, just from driving the car around the block and back into the garage a handful of times.The Lamborghini Countach is without a doubt the most iconic automobile of the 1980s. It was the poster-child for a generation. Those who lived through that decade were mesmerized by the cars incredible looks and performance, yet only the fortunate few had the wherewithal to put one in their garage. As original and well-maintained models have become increasingly difficult to find, exceptional examples are quickly being snatched up by collectors in anticipation of ever rising values, rarity, and desirability. This Countach is virtually as-new, as it has been incredibly well cared for and preserved every day of its life, and it marks a wonderful opportunity.

    • Last update: 24 days old

    For sale
  • RM Auctions
    +1 519 352 4575
    see details
  • To be OFFERED AT AUCTION at RMs Arizona event, January 15-16, 2015. To view this car and others currently consigned to this auction, please visit the RM website at rmauctions.com/. Estimate:$800,000 - $1,000,000 375 bhp, 3,929 cc DOHC V-12 engine with six twin-throat Weber 45 DCOE carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, unequal length A-arm front suspension with coil springs and an anti-roll bar, upper lateral-link rear suspension with lower A-arms, coil springs, and an anti-roll bar, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96.5 in.One of just 50 Countach LP 400S Series Is produced, and the second to last U.S.-federalized exampleFitted with the desirable Weber 45 DCOE carburetorsFinished in the desirable Tahiti Blue over blackAccompanied by original books and toolsLamborghinis LP 400S, the second variant of the iconic Countach, was launched four years after the production Countach LP 400 was introduced at the Geneva Salon in 1974. While the original car created nothing short of a fanfare, it goes without saying that the LP 400S had a big act to follow, and Lamborghini wasnt going to let it disappoint. The Countach was still very much in style, and Lamborghini knew it was best to change the cars aesthetics very little to retain the its unique personality. In order to be successful and a good following act for the LP 400, the LP 400S would have to retain the same distinct flair of its predecessor but address the minor quirks that both the company and paying customers had become aware of in the cars teething years.The LP 400S retained all the visual panache of its predecessor: scissor doors, eye-catching and aggressive Bertone styling, and enough power and performance to please even the most crazed horsepower junkies. The most notable change to the LP 400S was that the car was fitted with wider Pirelli tires, which helped to put the cars 375 horsepower to the ground. At the same time, the bodywork received muscular but subtle flares to house them, and the suspension geometry was completely revised to account for the change in the wheel and tire sizes. These changes helped make the Countach appear even more aggressive, and many LP 400 customers even requested that their cars receive the updates fitted to the LP 400S. Of course, performance remained incredible, with its top speed quoted at 179.8 mph.The 237 production Countach LP 400S examples are divisible into three distinct series, with the most desirable being the first, or Series I, examples. Fifty cars out of the production run fit into the first series, making them the rarest of all three series of the LP 400S. These Series I cars were characterized by their famous Campagnolo Bravo wheels, which were lovingly nicknamed telephone dials by enthusiasts for their distinctive styling. Additionally, the later Series I cars received larger gauges.The 1979 Countach LP 400S Series I offered here, bearing chassis number 1121096, is the second to last U.S.-federalized example produced and the third to last Series I example ever produced. According to factory documentation, the car was originally finished in the rare and desirable Tahiti Blue with a blue interior, and it was fitted with the larger and more desirable Weber 45 DCOE carburetors. The Lamborghini was U.S.-federalized and then delivered new to its first owner, Par Karmangar of San Diego, California. The car would remain in the United States under Karmangars ownership for over 20 years. During this time, the Countachs seats were reupholstered in the current black, but the dashboard and carpets remain original.Following minor cosmetic damage to the right front fender in 2001, the car was sold from Karmangars ownership to Carlos Costa, of Campbell, California, and repair work was undertaken in short order. Just prior to its sale to its current custodian, the Countach was serviced by Grand Prix Motors, also of Campbell, California, to ensure that it is in running order. This work included a brake service and a changing of the oil filter, amongst other minor services. It is also important to note that the car comes equipped with its original set of books and tools.As the Countach continues to rise in desirability and importance in the collector car world, the early LP 400 and LP 400S models continue to stand out from the rest in terms of rarity and design. With just 50 examples produced, first-series Countach LP 400S examples remain one of the most desirable models that money can buy. Offering slight updates over the Gandinis original design, the LP 400S provides welcome updates to the LP 400 both inside and out. This particular example is quite compelling, especially when considering that it wears its correct shade of Tahiti Blue, is the third from last Series I example constructed, and is fitted with its signature gold Campagnolo Bravo wheels. It certainly warrants consideration and close inspection.

    • Last update: 24 days old

    For sale
  • RM Auctions
    +1 519 352 4575
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  • £249,995 £249,995

    This is a very well cherished example of the final series of Countach. Supplied new by Portman Lamborghini and maintained by them and marque specialists, the car has covered just over 20,000 miles from new. In 2011 the car benefitted from a major overhaul. In the current ownership the car has been stored by ourselves and recently took part in a prestigious European tour after which the car had a further full check over by Famous Lamborghini specialists Colin Clarke Engineering to ensure that the car is presented in need of nothing and ready to be used and enjoyed.

    • Last update: 24 days old

    • Mileage: 20000 mi

    For sale
  • DK Engineering
    01923 287 687
    see details
  • Category Coupe Make Lamborghini Model Countach QV Engine power 335 kW / 455 PS Transmission Manual Kilometres 27.900 km Date of first registration 01.07.1988 Total price Price on request Value Added Tax not reclaimable (§ 25a UStG) Sales advisor for this vehicle >>

    • Year: 1988

    • Last update: 15 days old

    For sale
  • Auto Salon Singen
    07731 99 55 44
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  • £299,995 £299,995

    This stunning LHD Countach is the highly desirable 88 1/2 version, which featured a 48 valve engine on carburettors, improved suspension geometry and more subdued body styling. It has had one (company chairman) owner and is in superb condition throughout, having travelled only 55,000 kms from new with comprehensive history. The Rosso Siviglia paintwork and Senape interior are in excellent condition, and the car drives exactly as it should. Benefiting from a specialist engine refresh and factory gearbox rebuild less than 5,000 miles ago. Fitted with a sports exhaust and recent tyres on special order white wheels. Acknowledged by experts as the best driving version of this fast appreciating and iconic 'poster car'

    • Year: 1988

    • Last update: 2 months old

    • Mileage: 34000 mi

    For sale
  • Cheshire Classic Cars
    01244 529500
    see details
  • In 1985 the engine of the existing iterations of the Countach was improved again, bored and stroked to 5.2 litres (5,167 cc) and given four valves per cylinder (hence quattrovalvole). The six Weber carburettors were moved from the sides to the top of the engine for better breathing. As a result, these downdraft carburettors helped the engine produce 455 bhp, while also creating the need for the iconic hump which so famously hampered the car's rear visibility. The update to the carburettors, in conjunction with the strong angular styling, makes this one of the most desirable Countach versions. 610 cars were built. Supplied on the 3rd August 1988, this Countach 5000 QV is one of the 14 right hand drive supplied as the "88 1/2" model which featured the Anniversary sills. Chassis no 12410 has only had four owners in total and has been serviced and cared for correctly unlike many other examples. Finished in Rosso Siviglia with Beige hide and Brown Carpets, the original spare wheel, tool roll and Alpine stereo system are all still present. Bordeaux seat piping. Still an awesome machine by todays standards, the Countach has lost none of it presence since the day it was launched. The car i

    • Year: 1988

    • Last update: 2 months old

    For sale
  • Simon Furlonger
    01233 646328
    see details
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