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Jan Luehn Cars for sale

3 Search results
  • 1990 Porsche 962

    POA

    This specific car was built in 1991 as one of two Kremer CK6 with a carbon fibre chassis for the Group C series. The car started its racing career in the latest 962 spec with a 3.0-litre fun water cooled engine (water/water) and the latest Bosch Moronic 1.7 system. It also featured the wider track and an independent rear wing. • 23.6.1991 24 h Le Mans Reuter / Toivonen / Lehto 9th overall • 18.8.1991 430 km Nürburgring Reuter / Toivonen 3rd overall / Winner in Category 1 • 15.9.1991 430 km Magny-Cours Reuter / Toivonen 6th overall / Winner in Category 1 • 6.10.1991 430 km Mexico City Lopez / Reuter DNF • 21.6.1992 24 h Le Mans Reuter / Nielsen / Lavaggi 7th overall • 16.5.1993 Le Mans Test Saldaña / Donovan / Lavaggi 9th • 20.6.1993 24 h Le Mans Lässig / Lavaggi / Taylor 12th In 1994/5 the car was upgraded to Kremer K8 specification. Due to new regulations, the closed bodywork cars were banned from endurance racing and the open version, also called K8 was introduced. The K8 used the same chassis and running gear as the 962 CK6, but without a roof. The development included a new spyder bodywork, a different roll-bar behind the drivers seat and a slightly modified dashboard. In K8 sp

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    • Year: 1990
    For sale
    Jan Luehn
    +49 (0) 251 2844691 VIEW CONTACT NUMBER
  • 1969 McLaren M12 Coupe

    POA

    The M6 / M12 GT Coupe was a road going development of the McLaren M6 / M12 Can-Am car. In total, only 8 M6/M12 GTs coupes were built. McLaren Can Am Customer car number M12 #60-14 was built by the Lambretta-Trojan factory of Peter Agg, as were all customer McLarens, only the prototypes being built by the then very small McLaren factory in Colnbrook. The M12 was the 1969 customer version of the previous year's M6B, using the same chassis but with M8A type bodywork being fitted, which gave greater downforce than that in the M6B. Fourteen M12 spyders were built, and since chassis number 13 was not built, M12 60-14 was the last car produced. Numbers #10, #14 and #12 stayed at Shelby's shop for about a year before going to Holman and Moody's, where Vic Franzese bought #12 and #14 as rolling chassis (sold to Carrol Shelby in America 1969, without engine or gearbox). M12 #60-14 was sold on after a year, to Holman and Moody, the race preparation company, who in turn sold both M12 #60-12 and M12 #60-14 to Vic Franzese of Montour Falls, N.Y. Franzese was running a race team in the Can Am series and had previously fielded a McLaren M6B for Ron Goldleaf to drive. "The last two M12s" that Vic F

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    • Year: 1969
    For sale
  • 1968 Ford GT40

    POA

    GT40 P/1079 was delivered new from Ford Advanced Vehicles (FAV) as one of the few privately entered factory built lightweight racing cars to Mr Jean Blaton from Brussels, Belgium. Compared to the road cars (which are today often rebuilt and used as race cars), the competition cars had a stronger race spec engine, a smaller, but improved clutch and a 140 litre fuel tank. They also featured a lighter flywheel and 25% stiffer suspension all around. Further the race cars were missing its interior trim, the door pockets, a radio, the heater and exhaust silencers compared to the normal road cars. As this car was one of the very late cars built by John Wyer, it belongs to the last series of GT40 which had slightly modified body parts and was lighter than any of the earlier cars. The original invoice, which comes with the car, proves that Blaton received the yellow car on the 20th April 1968 in Ostende, Belgium for the Ecurie Francorchamps. This was just in time to put the car on a transporter for the 1.000 km race in Monza. The drivers Willy Mairesse and “Jean Beurlys” (the racing name of Jean Blaton) qualified the car 6th on the grid, but had to stop the race after 89 laps due to wheel p

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    • Year: 1968
    For sale