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  • 1962 Lancia Flaminia GT 3C Coupe

    For sale
    $148,500(£0)

    To many, a list of the greatest car manufacturers of Italy may struggle to reach past Ferrari, Lamborghini, Alfa Romeo and perhaps Maserati. But pose that same question to a full-blooded Petrol Head, and Lancia would likely be the first word out of their mouth. Founded in 1906 by Vincenzo Lancia, the company that bore his name went on to produce some of the most thoughtfully engineered and stylish automobiles the world has seen. Standard Lancias were generally more conservative than a comparable Alfa or Maserati, however Lancia cars are often compared with the likes of Mercedes-Benz for their level of build quality and engineering excellence. In practice, Lancia combined the best of both worlds – building automobiles that combined sophisticated engineering and brisk performance wrapped in gorgeous, unmistakably Italian bodywork. Their engineering prowess was reflected on the race track and special stage, where they have enjoyed tremendous success. From the 1960s to the 1990s, rallying was Lancia’s venue of choice where they hold a record ten World Constructor’s Championships. Aside from their quality, Lancia has always been known as a great innovator, responsible for many important firsts such as independent front suspension, the now ubiquitous V6 engine, and the first production car designed to use radial tires; the latter two debuting with the brilliant Aurelia. In 1957, the firm introduced the Aurelia’s equally outstaning replacement, the Flaminia. Offered as a four-door Berlina as well as short-wheelbase Coupe and Cabriolet, the Flaminia continued the theme of sophistication and style set by the Aurelia, with four-wheel independent suspension, four-wheel disc brakes mounted inboard at the rear, rear-mounted transaxle, and that gorgeous all-alloy V6 up front. Aside from the factory produced Berlina, a variety of the great Italian coachbuilders lent their hand to the Flaminia; namely Pininfarina, Carrozzeria Touring and Zagato. This 1962 Flaminia GT coupe is a highly desirable 2.5 model with optional triple Weber carburetors and gorgeous coachwork by Carrozzeria Touring of Milan, distinguished by its quad headlamps and crisp, elegant lines. The white main body is contrasted with a silver-painted roof with matching silver wheels. This history of this handsome Lancia picks up in 1974 when it was purchased by Jeff Cooper from a Giuliano Verna Motors in Bala Cynwyd, PA. Period photos show him enjoying the car in Lancia club events in the late 70s. In 1989, the Flaminia was purchased by a well-known Lancia enthusiast and unofficial marque ambassador, Tom Sheehan. Mr. Sheehan held a large inventory of parts and was a trusted resource for fellow Lancia owners in the USA. He purchased the car mid-restoration, after Mr. Cooper ran out of funds to complete the project. The restoration was completed and he retained the car until his death in 1994, when the car passed through the hands of several other enthusiasts before it found its way back to the late Walt Spak, a trusted Lancia expert and longtime friend and associate of Mr. Sheehan, who remembered the car fondly. Mr. Spak’s engines have powered concours winners from Pebble Beach to Amelia Island and beyond. Spak embarked on a comprehensive and meticulous rebuild of all mechanical systems (including the engine from the crankshaft up), which he estimated at 950 man-hours and over $40,000 in parts and machine work. Following Mr. Spak’s time, it found a home in a prominent collection of Italian cars, but the dealer who sold it very quickly bought it back for his own use, as he was so very fond of this elegant Lancia. Today, this gorgeous Lancia Flaminia is presented in superlative condition as a well-restored car that has enjoyed proper care and freshening through the years. The white painted main body is subtly accented by the gray painted roof. Paint condition is very good, with straight panels and excellent gaps all around; a clear sign that this Superleggera Touring-bodied car has been well cared for during its life. Along with the high-quality paint, the exterior has recently been refreshed with several new gaskets including for the front and back glass. Brightwork, including the chrome bumpers and delicate alloy body moldings is all very well-presented. The car rides on proper Michelin X radials mounted to factory original steel wheels and dressed with large-faced Lancia hubcaps – lending the car a clean, Modern-design appearance. Opening the door reveals a recently restored interior in fine condition. The tan hides on the seats and door panels provide a subtle contrast to the white body color, adding a rich and inviting appeal. The gray paint of the roof is mirrored on the dash, which is fitted with original Jaeger dials and original switchgear. The carpeting is very tidy, and the light grey color ties in with the paint scheme quite nicely. The carpeting is protected by a set of factory-correct fluted rubber mats in light gray. Even the trunk retains the original Touring Superleggera rubber mat. We particularly love the evocative three-spoke wooden steering wheel with its charming character scars courtesy of the previous owners who have cherished their time driving this car over the years. Thanks to the efforts and expertise of Walt Spak and its expert care since his work was done,  this Lancia’s 2.5 liter V6 runs beautifully, producing a healthy 150 horsepower in this triple-carb spec. Power is sent through a sweet-shifting four-speed manual transaxle with overdrive. The engine compartment very tidy and well-detailed with proper wrinkle-finish valve covers, a correct original tri-carb air cleaner, and correct hoses, fittings and clamps. Even the FIAMM air horns are painted their signature bright red hue, just visible through the grille. Included in the sale is a comprehensive history binder that documents the extensive past restoration work, including some recent freshening work that occurred in 2015. This rare and elegant Flaminia Touring Superleggera delivers not only a wonderful driving experience, but it also offers the opportunity for enjoyment on any number of exclusive tours and events. Experienced enthusiasts and collectors know that the Flaminia GT is one of the greatest Italian grand touring cars of the era, and this exquisite example is certain to charm its next keeper just as it has in the past.

    For sale
    $148,500(£0)
    Hyman Ltd
    314-524-6000 View contact number
  • 1935 Cadillac 355 D Phaeton

    For sale
    $189,500(£0)

    For the 1934 model year, Cadillac began a dramatic shift toward streamlined design. The first hints of streamlining appeared in 1933, as the headlights became more bullet-shaped, the grille gained a deeper Vee and the front fenders more curvaceously fill-figured. By the following year however, Cadillac debuted a stunning new design theme that would guide future models through the end of the decade. Most notable changes included new smaller headlights with long, tapered bullet housings which were now tucked closer to the radiator grille, which itself was dramatically canted back with a deep-vee shape. Fenders were also completely reworked, now more fully formed and with a beautifully curved profile. The following model year, 1935, saw a few minor refinements to the beautiful new design. Under that lovely new skin, more significant changes came for 1934 and 1935. The 355D chassis was an all-new design that featured independent “Knee Action” front suspension. Hydraulic dampers provided a controlled ride and the frame’s design allowed for lower body height; effectively lowering the center of gravity for improved handling. Even W.O. Bentley once complemented the 355’s exceptional ride quality, citing its remarkable composure over the Booklands bumps at 80mph. The venerable V8 engine remained essentially unchanged, retaining its reputation for easy, reliable power delivery. Bodies for the 355D series of 1935 were provided by GM’s two coachbuilding subsidiaries, Fisher and Fleetwood. Fisher bodies were fitted to the Series 10 and Series 20 (128” and 136” respectively) while Fleetwood bodies were reserved for the 146” wheelbase Series 30. Regardless of series and body, all 355Ds were powered by the same V8 engine and shared the same robust running gear. Today, Cadillacs of this era are highly prized by enthusiasts for their excellent road manners as well as their stunning good looks. Our featured 1935 Cadillac 355D is a 136” wheelbase Series 20 wearing one of the most dramatic of all designs from the Fisher catalog; the four-door, five-passenger Convertible Sedan, style number 35-671. According to build sheet data, this extremely handsome example was ordered in April of 1935 via Capitol Cadillac Co. of Washington, DC. The build sheet also indicates it was originally finished in Diana Cream (20768) with cream wheel discs fitted to brilliant green wheels and a tan top. The car was built for the 1935 A.A.O.N.M.S. Shrine Convention (known today as The Shriners) where it would serve as transport for the leader of the organization – Imperial Potentate Dana S. Williams. The build sheet indicates the car was to be lettered before delivery, and included period press photos confirm that as they show the car displaying the Shriner’s logo and the Potentate’s name, as well as showing Mr. Williams arriving at the event, standing proudly in this very Cadillac. Today, this fabulous Cadillac 355D presents in fine condition, wearing a high-quality, ground up restoration that while older, still shows extremely well. It is finished in a stunning bright red livery with a natural tan interior, and cream colored wheels covered in body-color discs. The rear fenders feature painted wheel spats which are a fabulous detail – giving the car a long, sporting appearance and calling to mind the Custom LeBaron Packards of a year or two earlier. The body is well accessorized with a pair of driving lamps, winged goddess mascot (as original) and optional painted metal side-mount spare wheel covers topped with Cadillac mirrors. This Fisher body features an integral trunk, and a folding trunk rack is also fitted for additional carrying capacity. The presentation is very good overall, making this car an attractive prospect for touring or mid-level shows. The tan leather interior remains in very good condition, with finely presented seating surfaces and a warm, inviting appeal. Door panels and carpets are likewise very well presented, and the interior as a whole is lavishly appointed with fine quality chrome fittings, textured ash trays, a robe rail for rear passengers and lovely wood door caps. In the dash reside the restored original gauges and the rare original Banjo steering wheel (indicated on the build sheet) remains fitted to the car. As this is a convertible sedan, the doors feature roll-up glass windows which seal tightly against the full folding top for all-weather touring ability. Mechanically, the robust 355 series V8 engine is in fine order, appearing very nicely detailed and tidy in the engine bay. It runs well and delivers a delightful driving experience, thanks to the well-preserved restoration as well as the inherent qualities of the advanced 355D chassis and drivetrain. This breathtaking Cadillac is one of just a handful to have been delivered with this fantastic Fisher body. With interesting early history and exquisite style, this 1935 Cadillac 355D Convertible Sedan is a wonderful choice for regular enjoyment on CCCA CARavan Tours, or similar AACA or Cadillac LaSalle Club events.

    For sale
    $189,500(£0)
  • 1931 Studebaker President 4 Seasons Roadster

    For sale
    $215,000(£0)

    In the late 1920s, the president of Studebaker, Albert Erskine wished to develop a new 8-cylinder flagship model that would not simply raise the marque’s standing in the market, but be nothing short of the finest automobile available on American roads. While the six-cylinder President model had been available since 1926, Erskine believed a prestigious 8-cylinder car would drive showroom traffic and give Studebaker a tool to use in motorsports competition. He charged his engineering team with the task of developing a new straight eight capable of standing with the best in the industry. Curiously, his chief engineer refused, insisting the current inline-six was more than sufficient for a top-of-the-line model. Understandably annoyed, Erskine promptly sacked his engineer and promoted Barney Roos, who relished in his new responsibilities. Roos designed a gem of an engine; a 313 cubic inch, 5-main bearing, L-head straight eight with gear driven cam and an impressive 100 horsepower output. The engine debuted in 1928 for the newly revamped President line. While smaller than the outgoing six, the new eight was notably smoother with superior refinement. For 1929, displacement increased to 337 cubic inches and power increased to 115 horsepower. Erskine strongly encouraged Studebaker’s involvement in motorsport, and with the new 8-cylinder President in the hands of the deeply talented Ab Jenkins, a number of speed records, endurance records and racing successes would follow; with some records holding for a full 35 years! Top results at the Indianapolis 500 and Pikes Peak Hillclimb would further cement the President’s reputation for performance and reliability. 1931 marked the arrival of the finest all the 8-cylinder Studebakers. Roos’ engine was further refined with and an industry-leading nine main-bearing crank, improved lubrication (including a replaceable oil filter), a crankshaft vibration damper, and improved breathing, with output raised to 122 horsepower. On track success continued, with a Studebaker-powered special taking a surprise pole-position at the 1931 Indianapolis 500. 1931 also saw the addition of the unmistakable “Ovaloid” headlamps which distinguished the President on the road, and with its V-shaped grille and heavily raked windscreen, and 130” wheelbase, the Studebaker President is no doubt a very special and imposing car. The President line would only be available through 1933, as Studebaker was plunged into a financial crisis, ultimately leading to the company going into receivership and Albert Erskine taking his own life. But his legacy lives on as the 1928-1933 President is the only Studebaker to achieve the coveted recognition as a CCCA Full Classic and remains one of the most prized models in the marque’s long history. This 1931 President 80-R Four-Seasons Roadster is a superb example of this rare, important and desirable Classic Era Studebaker. Wearing a very high-quality older restoration, this handsome roadster has received excellent care in the years since. Most recently, the car was treated to a cosmetic freshening by the highly regarded LaVine Restorations who retrimmed the interior, installed a new Haartz Stayfast top in black, restored and detailed the engine bay, and fabricated a new radiator. Since then, the car has been extremely well-preserved in excellent condition. The paint scheme is quite lovely, with the dove gray body accented with navy blue feature lines, fenders and wire wheels. Paint quality remains excellent thanks to light and careful use through the years. Body and panel fit are exemplary, in keeping with the quality of the restoration. Chrome fittings and accessories are all presented in very fine order. The distinctive V-shaped bumpers are excellent, as are the signature “Ovaloid” headlamps. Other accessories include dual trumpet horns, intricate radiator stone guard, a very rare and beautiful goddess mascot, fender-mounted marker lamps, and pedestal mirrors on the dual side-mount spare wheels. In the rear, the body features a golf-bag door, rumble seat, luggage rack and step pads for rear passengers. The car rides on blue-painted wire wheels with chrome trim rings, chrome center caps and whitewall tires giving it a delightfully sporting look. The light gray leather trim remains in outstanding condition, remaining supple and attractive and appearing to have seen very little use since being restored. Door panels, carpets, and soft trim are similarly in excellent order. The dash, which is finished in navy blue, features a plaque that proudly proclaims “Body Built by Studebaker” and another that simply declares it “The President”. Instruments are beautifully restored and mounted in a centrally mounted chrome panel as original. Beneath the hood lay Studebaker’s masterpiece; the nine main bearing, 337 cubic inch, inline eight, serial number P 9230. It is beautifully presented and very well detailed with excellent paint quality, correct fittings and tidy wiring and plumbing. The original oil filter housing remains in place, properly finished with a decal instructing users to replace every 12,000 miles. The engine runs beautifully, delivering its ample power with signature smoothness and finesse, making this President an outstanding driver’s car. This example’s CCCA Premier award-winning restoration remains in beautiful condition, ideally suited for CCCA CARavan touring, or for proud display in shows and concours. This President Four Seasons Roadster is a beautiful example from the high water mark for Studebaker in the Classic Era. The President remains one of the most important and desirable models in Studebaker history, and with just 54 President Four Seasons Roadsters known in Classic Car Club of America and Studebaker Club ranks, it is likely to be the only one at virtually any event.    

    For sale
    $215,000(£0)
  • 1966 Jaguar XKE Roadster

    For sale
    $182,500(£0)

    Mention Jaguar’s legendary E-Type and most enthusiasts will remark at its unmistakable beauty – and usually include the story of Enzo Ferrari declaring it the most beautiful car he ever saw. But the E-Type was so much more than just a pretty face when it first shocked audiences at the 1961 Geneva Salon. Jaguar delivered a car that was not only stunningly beautiful to look at, but offered 150mph performance and a highly sophisticated chassis yet it cost nearly half that of its competitors. Experience that was gained from the world-beating D-Type program was filtered into the design of the E-Type. The innovative and advanced D-Type had won LeMans three times on the fly, thanks to its advanced aerodynamics, powerful disc brakes and the lightweight, robust monocoque chassis. With the D-Type as a starting point, the E-Type sported a similar style chassis that used a sheet steel tub for the passenger compartment, paired with tubular steel subframes which supported engine and independent front suspension. The rear suspension was also independent, mounted to a modular subframe that carried the wishbones, hubs, diff, coil-over shocks and inboard disc brakes all in one unit. Those brakes were the same Dunlop four-wheel discs that had proven their worth in punishing conditions at LeMans. The XK six-cylinder engine (in 3.8l and later 4.2l form) was tuned to deliver 265 horsepower. All of this technology was wrapped in a gorgeous body penned by Jaguar’s aerodynamicist Malcolm Sayer and tweaked by Sir William Lyons himself. Jaguar had created a legend virtually overnight and the E-Type remains a cornerstone of the collector car world, where fine examples can be found in virtually every significant collection as well as in the hands of passionate enthusiasts. This lovely 1966 example is in arguably the most desirable spec for an E-Type: Series 1, Open Two Seat body, and 4.2 liters of XK twin-cam six-cylinder power. It is presented in the iconic color combination of Carmen Red over Biscuit hides and a black soft top. It wears a very good quality and properly detailed restoration that was done within the last ten years or so. Panel fit on the semi-monocoque body is very good, particularly considering the difficulty in restoring and aligning these bodies properly. Since the restoration was completed, the car has seen regular but careful use, and Carmen Red paint work remains excellent. Chrome plating on the bumpers and exterior trim is also excellent and the chrome knock-off wire wheels are wrapped in excellent, high-performance Avon radials. Biscuit upholstery presents in very good order throughout the cockpit. Correct pattern leather covers the seats, which show only light signs of use and minor creasing but remain very attractive. Proper materials are used on the door panels, dash, console and carpets. A very nice soft top is trimmed in black Stayfast canvas and features a matching boot cover. Correct hardura material lines the boot and the convertible top well, while interior fittings, switchgear and instruments remain in fine working order. Lifting the forward-hinged clamshell bonnet reveals a very clean and well detailed 4.2 liter XK twin-cam six-cylinder engine. The engine is the original, numbers matching unit with the original cylinder head still in place. Cam covers, intake and carburetors have been beautifully polished and the fittings and finishes are correct down to the porcelain black exhaust manifolds. It shows light use, but remains very clean and tidy overall. The chassis and front suspension are all visible through the open bonnet, again revealing correctly plated and finished components and an overall clean and well-detailed appearance. As a factory 4.2, it benefits from improved power brakes and the fully-synchronized four-speed manual gearbox and performance is excellent, with huge torque from the big six and finely honed handling. This is a very fine and well-restored E-Type that is ideally suited to regular use and casual show. It is a car we have had the pleasure to offer in the past, and it has remained in lovely order since we last saw it. It has benefited from regular care and upkeep on top of the high-quality and correct restoration. The beautiful looks, magnificent road manners and lovely presentation make this a truly outstanding and thoroughly enjoyable example of Jaguar’s most iconic car.

    For sale
    $182,500(£0)
  • 1931 Cadillac 355-A Roadster

    For sale
    $179,500(£0)

    Henry M. Leland was one of America’s great automotive pioneers. As an engineer and partner in Leland & Faulconer, he was an early proponent of standardized parts, and was instrumental in the development the single-cylinder “Little Hercules” engine. He soon became an expert in turning around struggling firms and with the encouragement of investors, he built his first car company from the ruins of the failed Henry Ford Company. After ousting the management and reorganizing the assets, the firm was renamed “Cadillac Automobile Company” and he set to work developing a new range of motorcars. Leland made enemies with Henry Ford in the process, but he would quickly establish Cadillac as a leader in innovation, mechanical sophistication and luxurious quality. That spirit continued under the auspices of General Motors after it took over in 1909. From the earliest days of single-cylinder Cadillacs, the company was renowned for their exceptional build quality and elegant style. Cadillac was proudly placed them at the pinnacle of the GM product line where it remains to this day. Cadillac was riding a wave of success going into the 1930s. A wise decision to include a “junior” brand (LaSalle) kept the company afloat as the economy faltered. They entered the decade with a heady confidence that spawned the incredible V16 and V12. Aside from the volume leader LaSalle, Cadillac’s mainstay for the 1930s was the 355 series; an 8-cylinder model manufactured between 1931 and 1935. As typical, it was available in variety of standard catalog body styles that ranged from a formal limousine to a sporting 2 door roadster, mostly supplied by GM’s favored coachbuilders at Fleetwood and Fisher. Cadillac’s model naming system usually coincided with the engine size, but that changed in 1931 as the 355-A carried over the Series 353’s 5.8 liter, 353 cubic inch V8 L-head engine. However, much was new for 1931 including a redesigned frame and restyled lower and wider bodies. Output was a full 95 horsepower, which was plenty enough to give the big Cadillac very respectable performance for its day. Even in the face of the Great Depression, Cadillac enjoyed strong sales, with more than 10,000 examples of the 355-A built for ’31. This lovely 1931 Cadillac 355-A has been part of two very prominent collections for many years. It wears body style number 4502, the 2/4 passenger Roadster by Fleetwood, considered the most sporting offering in the catalog for 1931. The body rides atop the standard 134” wheelbase chassis, which imparts the car with graceful proportions. This car has been treated to a high quality restoration that, while older, remains very attractive inside and out. It is finished in a tri-tone color scheme with the main body finished in off-white contrasted by burgundy fenders and swage lines, with brighter red wheels, frame and coach stripes. This former CCCA National First Prize winner wears a very high quality restoration that has aged quite well. Since its show days, it has been enjoyed carefully, mellowing slightly into a very attractive and pleasing car that would be a wonderful companion for touring. Paintwork remains in very good order throughout, and the chrome plating on the numerous accessories is outstanding. Numerous options include dual side-mount spare wheels, dual steerable Pilot-Ray driving lamps, radiator stone guard and goddess mascot. Other fittings include a chrome trunk rack, cowl-mounted search light and wind wings. It rides on a set of whitewall Firestone tires mounted on beautiful wire wheels that feature body color rims and hubs with polished stainless spokes. Throughout the car, the detailing and finish work impart a sense of quality, showing this car was restored properly and has been very well preserved since. Inside, red leather upholstery covers the seats and door cards which remains in excellent condition, showing virtually no wear. Dark red carpeting is also excellent, as are the cockpit fittings and controls. The top is trimmed in dark red canvas which complements the body and interior color scheme quite nicely. Instruments are in very fine order, including the original Jaeger clock, and AC Speedo. The dials are set in a beautiful sunburst instrument panel flanked by engine-turned alloy inserts. A set of side curtains is included for the rare occasion this lovely Cadillac gets caught in inclement weather; although we imagine it will be the red canvas top boot that sees the most use, as this car looks absolutely fantastic with its roof folded, ready for motoring in the sunshine. Mechanically, this Cadillac is well-sorted and very correct. These wonderful cars have proven quite popular with touring enthusiasts as they are renowned for their outstanding road manners, strong brakes and smooth, reliable nature. This 355-A is no exception, as the attractive and high-quality restoration translates into an enjoyable drive, making it a great candidate for CCCA CARavan touring, AACA events or casual show. Added to that is the desirable Fleetwood Roadster coachwork to make a finely presented and handsome example of one of Cadillac’s best driver’s cars.

    For sale
    $179,500(£0)
  • 1951 Mercedes-Benz 170S Cabriolet A

    For sale
    $169,500(£0)

    Mercedes-Benz has been a manufacturing powerhouse for over a century, and during World War II, its factories were highly valuable targets for Allied bombers. Many of their manufacturing and design facilities were heavily damaged, but despite this, the company was quick to resume automobile production after the war. The first post-war cars were the W136 170 V sedans which traced their roots back to the late 1930’s. These bread-and-butter sedans served as solid, reliable transportation in the austere post-war years and became popular with taxi and delivery drivers. But as Europe recovered and production of the 170 V increased, so too did demand for more luxurious and special models. To meet this demand, the 170 S was introduced. The first special-class car to be built by Mercedes-Benz after the War; the 170 S had a more powerful engine than the 170 V, as well as improved front suspension, revised styling and a more luxurious and spacious cabin. Power came from an uprated version of the 1.7 liter inline four-cylinder engine, producing 53 horsepower and 82 ft-lbs or torque. The 170 S was offered as a handsome saloon, full four-seat Cabriolet B and sporty Cabriolet A. Open cars were meticulously hand-built at Mercedes’ Sindelfingen Carrosserie, where they were luxuriously trimmed with leather and wood. While Mercedes was still many years away from officially designating “S-Class” as its flagship range, many feel that the 170 S is its spiritual predecessor. With the 170 S, Mercedes-Benz had marked its return to the top of the luxury motorcar market. This outstanding 1951 170 S is from the final year of production, one of just a handful sold that year with the highly desirable Cabriolet A coachwork by Sindelfingen. A gorgeous car from top to bottom, it has been treated to a concours-quality restoration with meticulous attention to detail. Copies of the original build sheets and documents show this car was ordered in July of 1951. Upon its completion, it was dispatched from the Sindelfingen Werk, bound for Zurich Switzerland. Swiss import documents dated March 28th 1952 show it was delivered to Herr Ernst Benz. Not long after, the Mercedes was purchased in Switzerland by an American Army officer, and it eventually made its way to the United States. In about the mid-1960s, it was purchased by Richard A. Carlson of Coatesville, Pennsylvania who kept it for approximately 20 years. The next owner was Mr. Walter Progner who purchased the car in 1984, and is the man who eventually embarked on a multi-year restoration to return this fine motor to its former glory. These early post-war Mercedes-Benz automobiles are extremely difficult and costly to restore properly, and as such, we seldom see them given the treatment they deserve. Thankfully, Mr. Progner was a passionate enthusiast who lavished the little Mercedes with tremendous care. As the restoration commenced, the chassis and mechanicals were entrusted to Gerhardt Reinhard, proprietor of a small shop in Pennsylvania that specializes in classic Mercedes-Benz automobiles. Mr. Reinhard was himself an employee of the Sindelfingen Werk during the time this car was built – making it entirely possible he had a hand in its original construction and its restoration! Concurrently, the body and interior were restored over a three year period by Barry Stalnecker of Annville, PA, while the extensive brightwork was restored to concours standards by Martin’s of Philadelphia. The results of the restoration speak for themselves. Paintwork has been restored to the original shade of maroon (DB 513), and is beautifully applied showing straight, clean reflections and glassy-smooth surfacing. As part of the restoration, the body was removed from the chassis, jigged and disassembled. These are notoriously difficult to align properly, and the restorers did an exemplary job refitting the panels. The rear-hinged doors fit very well, with even gaps and the signature solid-hewn feel that is unmistakable Mercedes-Benz. Fitment of the extensive chrome trim is excellent, and even upon close inspection, reveals virtually flawless finishing. Interesting details include the semaphore turn signals, and the flush fit tail lamps. Most 170s had bullet-type tail lights, but this being a late production example; it features the flush-mounted units that were carried over into the later 220 S and 300 S models. Of course, the signature of the 170 S was the luxuriously trimmed interior. Again, using the build sheet as a reference, this car was restored using natural tan leather supplied by a German restoration specialist. The material is exquisite and unmarked, expertly fitted to the frames. The folding, occasional rear seats are also trimmed in the same high quality leather, as are the door cards and even the fascia of the dash. Caramel-colored carpets tie in beautifully with the natural leather, again very nicely executed, in excellent condition and in factory correct materials. Leaving no screw unturned, the restorers returned the wood, which adorned the dash, door caps and cockpit surround, to its original natural finish. Interior chrome fittings are beautiful, and the dash is equipped with its correct VDO instrumentation and a most wonderful, original Telefunken Radio. The fully-lined cabriolet top features large chrome landau bars and is trimmed in correct tan German Sonnendeck canvas. The trunk is detailed with a correct spare wheel, original tool roll and jack as well as a 2 piece set of fitted luggage, held in situ with leather straps. Beneath the bonnet, the engine is well detailed, showing only the lightest signs of use, but remaining in very clean and tidy condition. Despite its modest horsepower and pre-war era roots, the engine is a strong and eager unit, delivering performance that is brisk and enjoyable. Road manners are excellent, as this car has received some recent servicing and sorting. The history is very well documented with copies of the rare original build sheet, early customs documents, and extensive restoration records. Original service manuals, parts books and instruction books are included as is a fantastic original dealer brochure and trophies from its exploits on the show field. Shown multiple times at the world famous AACA Eastern Fall Meet, best known as "Hershey", this fabulous car was awarded an AACA Senior award in 2009, and an AACA Preservation award in 2012. It has also been shown on the lawn of the prestigious Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in 2013. This superb Mercedes-Benz 170 S has been cherished by its previous owners, and the quality of the restoration speaks to its importance in the collector world. Just over 800 units of the 170 S Cab A were produced between 1948 and 1951, and this is one of the last of last Mercedes to be truly hand-built in the historic Sindelfingen works; a very special and highly desirable motorcar from Mercedes’ golden era.

    For sale
    $169,500(£0)
  • 1972 Volvo 1800ES Sports Wagon

    For sale
    $36,500(£0)

    Volvo’s reputation was built on the backs of its stout, reliable and robust automobiles.  It was the distinctly American-inspired PV444/544 that helped the company establish its foothold in the North American marketplace. In the early days of selling cars in the US, Volvo customers were a very small but loyal group of eccentrics who knew their cars to be something special. Enthusiastic drivers soon discovered the Volvo B-series engine could be highly tuned and these big lumbering Volvos could be seen giving Porsches, MGs and Healeys some unlikely heat in SCCA competition. Company bosses in Sweden were very aware of their reputation and wanted to capitalize on it with a proper sports car. They envisioned a “halo” model that would attract attention to show rooms and help sell regular sedans. Their first attempt, the fiberglass P1900, was a failure with just 68 built, but Volvo did not give up and quickly commissioned a new car, based on a shortened Amazon chassis with an all new steel body. Several Italian coachbuilders were courted; while Volvo’s in-house team also worked up a proposal. The resulting car was largely a Swedish design, albeit tweaked by Frua of Turin who also built the first prototypes. Once the P1800 hit the showrooms, it proved to be an immediate success. The styling was truly a standout, and the proven 1.8 liter four-cylinder engine produced a healthy 118 horsepower. Over the next twelve years, Volvo continually refined the P1800, adding fuel injection and increasing the engine size among other tweaks. In 1972, a unique and sporty 2-door wagon variant was introduced – known as the 1800 ES. Only in production for two model years, (1972 and ’73), the 1800 ES was surely one of the most stylish utility cars ever conceived. The frameless glass hatch was the highlight of the design, one that would inspire the 480 and C30 models decades later. The ES retained the sporting appeal of the standard 1800 S, but beautifully integrated the wagon bodywork, allowing for a surprising amount of practical storage, particularly with the rear seats folded. Just over 8,000 were produced in the car’s two year run, making the wagons among the rarest of the 1800s. This 1972 1800 ES is a wonderful ex-California car; a stand-out example of this rare and unique Swedish sports wagon. Given Volvo’s legendary longevity, most 1800s of this type were driven hard for years and left in tired, worn-out condition. This car is a rare exception as it has received sympathetic restoration work as needed, with careful attention paid to preserving its originality. The bodywork is beautifully straight, and the paintwork in correct original Light Blue Metallic (Code 111) is exceptional; restored to a standard far and above what these cars typically see. Reflections are straight and the gloss is deep, with just a few slight signs of use visible upon close inspection. Likewise, the bright exterior trim and chrome bumpers are straight, shiny and clean, having been mostly restored and replated at the time of the repaint. Fitment of the body is excellent and it sits proudly on factory correct sport steel wheels with trim rings and black wall radial tires. The interior presents in fine condition, with black seats and interior panels offset by pretty blue carpeting. Original-type black upholstery is excellent in the front and rear, showing only light signs of use. The dash top, which is prone to cracks on these cars, has been replaced and presents in excellent order. The rest of the dash and switchgear are excellent and only an AM/FM cassette stereo deviates from the standard specification. This 1800ES is equipped with the desirable four-speed manual with electric overdrive. Also, the B20 engine is Bosch fuel-injected which delivers smooth performance and legendary reliability. Thanks to recent servicing, it runs and drives beautifully, and with its exceptional cosmetics, this uniquely stylish Volvo is ready for many more miles of motoring enjoyment.  

    For sale
    $36,500(£0)
  • 1930 Cadillac V16 Limousine

    For sale
    $175,000(£0)

    Upon the introduction of the stunning new Series 452 V16 at the New York Auto Show on January 4th 1930, Cadillac assumed the command of the hotly contested American luxury car marketplace. With this, the world’s first purpose-built V16 engine, Cadillac triggered a “cylinder war” among its competitors, but despite the best efforts from the likes of Packard, Marmon and Pierce-Arrow, Cadillac maintained a firm grip on its crown. The centerpiece of the new car was of course the Owen Nacker-designed 452 cubic-inch overhead valve 45-degree V16 that delivered its incredible 175 horsepower with unrivaled smoothness and panache. Not only was this a powerful engine, but it was also beautiful, with particular effort given to hiding the plumbing and wiring while and dressing the engine with black enamel and polished metal. Cadillac preferred not to publish performance figures for the Sixteen, rather letting the car speak for itself, which it did so quite handily. Many independent coachbuilders made their mark on this magnificent chassis, but most clients selected from the wide variety of custom-catalog bodies offered by in-house coachbuilders Fleetwood and Fisher; which today are no less elegant or desirable. This striking 1930 Cadillac Series 452 is chassis number 700859, fitted from new with body Style 4375 from the Fleetwood catalog; a handsome and imposing Formal Inside-Drive Limousine with divider window and opera seats. Riding atop a 148-inch wheelbase and finished in an attractive black and silver livery, this wonderful Cadillac certainly makes a dramatic statement. A copy of the original build sheet indicates number 700859 was delivered new through Collins Bros. Co. of Portland, Oregon. Some gaps in the history remain, but from the mid-1970s, the Cadillac was kept as part of a collection for the better part of 25 years, and was restored to the current condition circa 1990 from what a very sound and original car. In 2001, 700859 joined a prominent Canadian collection, and the owner set about sorting the car mechanically to ensure a rewarding drive. It was shown at the 2002 Meadowbrook Concours d’Elegance where it earned a Lion Award for its exceptional beauty and presentation. It eventually became part of the J. Taylor Auto Collection museum, where it was kept in fine order. Today, this handsome formal Cadillac presents in attractive condition, with very good quality paintwork and detailing. The black fenders and upper surfaces are excellent, showing beautifully straight and properly aligned panels. The silver body sides and accents are also very good, with only a few minor touchups to be found upon close inspection. Fleetwood’s styling is quite elegant and graceful, a beautiful design that avoids staid or awkward lines that sometimes afflict formal body styles of the period. The black and silver livery is handsome, and the car’s painted silver wire wheels and wide-whitewall tires add a finely judged touch of class. At $6,525, this was a massively expensive car in its day, and is suitably accessorized to reflect its stature. Dual Trippe-Light driving lamps, dual chrome trumpet horns, Tilt-Ray headlamps, a Goddess radiator mascot, dual side mount spares with mirrors and a large painted trunk count among the adornments. In mechanical terms, this Cadillac is in fine order, with a strong running V16 engine that shows well in the engine bay with a factory appropriate detailing and moderate patina from use since the restoration was completed. The chassis is equipped with four wheel, vacuum assisted mechanical drum brakes and hydraulic dampers to ensure smooth, safe handling that can keep pace with the power of the V16 engine. The undercarriage is tidy and clean, again showing some light use in the time since its restoration. As appropriate for a formal limousine, the chauffeur’s compartment is upholstered in black leather which shows in very good condition today. An array of attractive original instruments is flanked by engine turned panels and beautiful wood trim runs across the top of the dash and doors. Rear passengers are treated to luxurious accommodations. Gray cloth upholstery, which is in excellent order, covers the door panels, seats and headlining. Dual, forward-facing “opera seats” fold from the floor to accommodate two additional passengers, and an umbrella holder is incorporated into the central division, placed curb-side, of course. Other amenities include a dome light, central folding arm rest, beautifully restored wood trim and a Fleetwood branded Jaeger 8-day clock. With its handsome formal coachwork and high quality older restoration, this Cadillac V16 by Fleetwood is a very usable example of this iconic classic motorcar. As a recognized Full Classic and with its pleasingly mellowed restoration, it is ideally suited for CCCA CARavan touring and similar events, a practical and beautifully presented machine from the pinnacle of the American Classic Era.

    For sale
    $175,000(£0)
  • 1921 Ford Model T Center Door Sedan

    For sale
    $39,500(£0)

    The Ford Model T is a machine that ranks as one of the most significant and important inventions of the 20th century. Henry Ford’s development of the moving assembly line was so significant that he is oft compared to the likes of Alexander Graham Bell and Eli Whitney as the most influential names in American Industrial history. As the first product to roll of that assembly line, the Model T became one of America’s proudest industrial successes. Much of the historical focus is paid to the way the Model T was assembled, and how Henry Ford ruthlessly revolutionized mass manufacture. But even when viewed apart from the ingenious production methods, the Ford Model T could stand proudly as a truly remarkable and versatile machine that was a smashing worldwide success. Because Ford was able to build so many Ts so quickly, the price was low and suddenly the automobile was accessible to millions who never dreamed of owning one before. Its popularity even spawned an aftermarket industry that allowed the T to be adapted to virtually anything: From racing cars to farm implements, the Model T could do it all. Ford was enough in tune with his customer needs to offer a wide variety of bodies to meet demand. Touring cars and Depot Hacks moved people, while the Pickup and Commercial Roadster offered versatility for tradesmen. One of the most unusual and interesting variants was the “center door”; officially known as the “Two Door, Five-Passenger Sedan”. Styled along the lines of the traditional Doctor’s Coupe from the carriage building days, the simple yet roomy body featured two doors mounted – you guessed it – in the center of the body sides. It offered comfort and protection in all weather conditions, and the roomy cabin was comfortable for longer journey. This was Ford’s first sedan and one of the first fully closed mass produced cars in America. In its day, the center door was the most expensive Model T passenger car available, at nearly $950, meaning it was also one of the least popular with buyers. Today, the rare and quirky center door is a favorite among collectors and Model T aficionados. This tidy 1921 Ford Model T center door is a nicely restored example of this rare and desirable model. Finished correctly in all black, this nickel era Model T is a nice, honest and usable motorcar that would be a fine choice for the collector or entry level hobbyist alike. Wearing an older restoration, it presents in good order with attractive black paintwork on a good and sound body. A few minor blemishes can be found in the paint, which do little to detract from the overall appeal of this fine Model T. It is correctly fitted with a black radiator, Ford script running boards, wooden artillery wheels and minimal bright adornments, as a great deal of new-old-stock parts were sourced for the restoration. The black headlights feature nickel trim rings and lovely fluted lenses as original. The tall, upright windscreen is split to allow for better airflow through the cabin, and the doors feature opening carriage-style windows. We particularly like the elegant oval rear window treatment, which lends the basic Model T a degree of formal appeal. The five passenger cabin (two individual seats up front with a 3 person bench in rear) on this example is a real highlight of the restoration; trimmed in lovely blue/gray tweed wool fabric to a very high standard. The stylish and high quality fabric covers the seats and interior panels, while a complementing headlining and wool squareweave carpet are extremely well executed. Details such as a privacy blind over the rear window and a running-in instruction decal on the windscreen add a welcome bit of period charm. The restorers even went so far as to hand weave the windlace in the factory correct patterns. As part of the restoration, the chassis and undercarriage have been very well detailed, still presenting in clean condition with good quality, hard-wearing finishes on the major components. Ford’s bulletproof four-cylinder engine also presents in good order, having been rebuilt as part of the restoration, and while it is showing some signs of regular use, it is generally tidy and correctly detailed. As a later model, it features a handy electric starting and charging system, making this Model T much more user friendly and practical than earlier examples. This 1921 Model T Center Door Sedan is a very well-presented, usable and enjoyable example that would be finely suited for regular touring and enjoyment.

    For sale
    $39,500(£0)
  • 1970 Mercedes-Benz 300 SEL 6.3 Sedan

    For sale
    POA

    Some of history’s truly great automobiles have been born from engineers working off the clock, building experimental projects far from the prying eyes of company brass and the meddling of the accounting department. Especially within large companies, radical ideas will surely be nixed if merely presented on paper. One such engineer was Erich Waxenberger of Mercedes-Benz. In the late 1960s, Herr Waxenberger came up with the simple but elegant idea of the ultimate factory super sedan. Starting with a standard W109 sedan, a car that left the factory with nothing bigger than a 3-liter inline-six, and working on his own time, he shoehorned in the mighty 6.3 liter all-alloy M100 V8 into the mid-sized saloon. The M100 was designed specifically for the highly exclusive 600 sedan and limousine, but Waxenberger believed that not only could he build a superb sporting saloon using the smaller body, he could better utilize the specialized production facility that was building these massive engines. He and his team built a prototype and handed the keys over to Mercedes-Benz factory test driver Rudi Uhlenhaut. The legend is that Uhlenhaut had to stop and open the hood at the first traffic signal to see what on earth Waxenberger had crammed into the 300SEL! Buoyed by the enthusiasm from Uhlenhaut, the car saw rapid approval by company bosses, especially given that the expensive M100 engine could now be sold in another car. The production version of the 300SEL 6.3 featured sophisticated air suspension, a four-speed automatic transmission, four wheel disc brakes, electric windows, sunroof, opulent wood trim and leather upholstery. Upon its introduction to the public in 1968, it was declared the fastest four-door car in the world and could easily keep pace with American muscle cars of the era. In fact, the 300SEL 6.3 could give a contemporary Porsche 911 a serious run for its money. Road & Track magazine declared it “merely the greatest sedan in the world”. While less expensive than the 600, the 6.3 was still a costly car when new, and just 6,500 were built between 1968 and 1972. The 6.3 served its purpose as a regular production outlet for the M100 V8, as well as forming the foundation of a legacy of high-performance luxury sedans that Mercedes-Benz still upholds with the AMG line of super saloons. This 1970 300SEL 6.3 is an attractive and understated example, finished in Light Ivory (code 670) over red leather upholstery (code 242). It is a very well-maintained and largely original car, accompanied by extensive service records from model specialists. The body is straight and clean, with an attractive, good quality respray over an excellent body. Gaps are factory precise and all four doors operate with that signature vault-like feel. The original bumpers, body moldings, grille, window surrounds and other brightwork are all straight and in good order, benefitting from a recent polish. It rides on a set of beautifully finished factory Bundt alloy wheels that lend a slightly aggressive and purposeful look to the otherwise restrained Paul Bracq-penned styling. This 6.3 is in many ways the ultimate sleeper: Understated, with only its discreet badging and a slightly wider stance giving the slightest hint at its massive acceleration and 140mph ability. Stepping into the luxurious cabin, you may still be hard pressed to realize this is a serious performance car. The atmosphere is very much about comfortable touring over outright sportiness, with high quality and attractive leather trim and wood moldings. The leather is believed to be original, and presents in very good condition, showing a slight bit of wear on the driver’s outer bolster, but remaining attractive and supple with an inviting light patina. The rear seat is in similar condition, showing little use. Wool carpets are excellent as are the door panels and recently refreshed headlining. Beautifully restored wood trim adorns the dash fascia, dash top, as well as door and windscreen surrounds. It is also equipped with an original Becker Mexico cassette player and correct ivory steering wheel. Mechanically this car is in very sound order and is essentially turn-key and ready to enjoy. Records show the air suspension was fully rebuilt, as was the complex fuel injection pump; rebuilt by respected specialist Jerry Fairchild. The steering box was removed and resealed, and many bushings and ancillaries refreshed in the chassis. It works as it should and is a strong performing example, a very important factor when considering any 6.3. Included in the sale are original books, manuals and tool kit along with the extensive service records and factory service information. The 300 SEL 6.3 is a car that should never have existed in its day yet went on to become a legend, the father of a line of performance sedans that continue through today. This is a cherished example that has had thousands spent to ensure it continues to thrill drivers for years to come.

    For sale
    POA
  • 1979 Toyota FJ 40

    For sale
    $74,500(£0)

    Like the Jeep and the Land Rover before it, the Toyota Land Cruiser is a vehicle whose reputation was hard earned in battle, mud, and desert sand. This Japanese take on the all-purpose off-roader can thank the original Jeep for its existence, which is little surprise when comparing the two trucks side-by-side.  In 1950, the US Government commissioned Toyota to build 100 Willys Jeeps that were to be used in the Korean War. Toyota obliged but immediately saw room for improvement on the old American design. In 1951 Toyota developed their own prototype drawing on the best the Jeep and the Land Rover had to offer. Production of the “Toyota Jeep BJ” began in 1953 and the vehicle was put into service primarily for police and military. In 1954, the civilian version gained the Land Cruiser name and grew in popularity as an all-round utility vehicle for farmers or anyone needing to get over rough terrain. In 1960, the 40-series Land Cruiser was unveiled with all-new body styling, an improved chassis and new engine options. 40-Series Land Cruisers were offered in a variety of body styles ranging from the most popular short-wheelbase convertible, to long wheelbase troop carriers and pickups. Also, like the Land Rover and Jeep, it was highly adaptable and saw duty in battle, fire service, ambulance service and countless other industrial and agricultural roles. It served at the hands of soldiers and warlords alike on virtually every continent around the globe. In regular production for 24 years, the FJ has become a legend for its amazing ruggedness as much as its tough-guy good looks. Hundreds of thousands of Land Cruiser FJ40s are still in service in all corners of the earth, no matter how remote they may be. Our featured 1982 FJ40 Hardtop is a wonderful example finished in the evocative shade of Olive Green (code 653) with a white roof. This fabulous truck has been treated to a sympathetic but comprehensive restoration including new many suspension and driveline components. It drives exceptionally well, and we have thoroughly enjoyed putting a few miles on this fine FJ. The body is very good and authentically restored, showing the subtle seams and imperfections it would have had when it left the factory in 1982. This example is equipped with the desirable “ambulance door” arrangement in the back, making ingress and egress easier for rear passengers, and allowing access to the rear without moving the swing-out spare tire. Like the body, the paintwork is very good. It has not been over-restored, but it is very attractive and in a fabulous original color that suits the rugged styling very well. Exterior trim is correctly restored; the painted bumpers and white painted grille surround keeping in line with the basic, sturdy appeal. Nice details such as the Japanese Koito headlamps point to the level of care given this outstanding FJ. Climbing aboard gives you a real sense of purpose – this is a tough hewn tool that’s ready for almost anything you throw at it. The front bucket seats and rear jump seats are upholstered in correct gray vinyl which is in excellent condition, showing virtually no wear. The dash, steering wheel and controls are all correct and original, and it is equipped with a heater – about the only concession to “luxury” you’d be likely to find in an FJ40. The only deviation from standard is the application of textured bedliner material which not only provides a layer of protection for the bare floors, but also helps to reduce vibration and dampen cabin sounds. The bedliner has been painted body color to mimic the factory interior treatment. Rubber mats also provide a bit of additional protection. We are particularly fond of the way this FJ drives; it displays excellent road manners and feels exceptionally well-sorted. Brakes are strong, steering is tight and the truck sits proudly on its 31” x 10” BF Goodrich All-Terrain TA tires – which look particularly good on the basic, gray painted steelies adorned with dog-dish hubcaps as original. As part of the restoration, the suspension has been thoroughly refreshed with high-quality Old Man Emu components used throughout. Toyota’s virtually bulletproof 2F inline-six displaces 4.2 liters and returns 135 horsepower and a quite useful 210 ft. lbs. of torque. On this truck, the engine bay is extremely well-detailed with original decals and labels in place, and a superbly clean presentation. We are big fans of these rugged, brawny little Toyotas and this is surely of the best we’ve had the pleasure to offer. The high quality, well-detailed restoration lends great looks to match the excellent mechanical condition. This FJ40 is ready to be enjoyed on the road or on your favorite trails.

    For sale
    $74,500(£0)
  • 1936 Lincoln Model K Convertible Sedan

    For sale
    $189,500(£0)

    From 1931 through 1940, the K-series sat atop the Lincoln lineup, serving as the marque’s flagship offering during the height of, and twilight of, the coachbuilt American motorcar era. The first K-series cars were powered by an L-Head V8 of adequate power, but Cadillac’s headline-stealing salvo in the multi-cylinder war prompted Edsel Ford to respond, and he did so with the commission a V12 engine which was introduced in 1932. The K-series was split between the small displacement KA and the larger and more prestigious KB. By 1934, the series was consolidated and powered by a new 414-cubic inch V12, which remained the basis for the line through 1940. The biggest improvements to the engine came in 1936 with the introduction of hydraulic lifters and a revised cam which allowed for smoother and virtually silent operation. Also from 1936 onward, the engine sat further forward in the chassis, which allowed for greater interior volume, and the body was reworked with a more streamlined appearance. Even with the addition of the Zephyr, Lincoln’s wealthiest clients remained loyal to the Model K, as it still offered the road presence and status of a full-sized, coachbuilt motorcar. Lincoln allowed buyers to specify one of at least 17 different custom-catalog body styles; so each car was built to a standard design with colors and trim chosen by the client. Once selected, the car was built and finished to their tastes. The 1936 K-Series Lincoln was elegant and understated, yet it still had an imposing presence that demanded attention. Ultimately however, sales suffered particularly as the junior series Lincoln Zephyr offered twelve-cylinder prestige at a fraction of the price of the hand-built K-Series. This wonderful 1936 Lincoln Model K wears LeBaron style 334, an elegant convertible sedan body with glass partition riding atop a 145-inch wheelbase chassis. One of just 30 examples of its kind produced, this car is believed to have been purchased new by the Wrigley Family, delivered via a California dealer and kept at the family’s famous Pasadena mansion on Millionaire’s Row. It is not known exactly how long the Wrigley’s retained the car, but it is understood that it remained in California for the next seventy years, eventually joining the legendary broadcaster Art Astor’s extensive collection. It remained with Mr. Astor until its sale in 2008 and it has since been treated to a very sympathetic cosmetic restoration that has been maintained in fine order. The car wears high quality black paintwork that remains in very good condition, atop very straight and sound bodywork. The body is subtly striped in dark red and accessorized with dual side mount spare wheels, dual Trippe driving lamps, dual mirrors and a greyhound radiator mascot. The LeBaron design incorporates an elegantly sloping built-in trunk, while a trunk rack is also fitted for additional luggage capacity. Wide whitewall tires are mounted to optional red wire wheels (stamped steel wheels were offered in 1936 as well) which help to add a pop of color and nicely tie together the interior and exterior themes. Inside the luxurious cabin, dark red leather covers the seats and door panels in front and rear. Roll up side glass keeps occupants warm and dry in poor weather, though we can’t imagine the Wrigley family encountering much of that in beautiful Pasadena! The driver’s compartment has recently been retrimmed as part of the restoration work and shows very light use since; while the rear compartment is believed to still feature the original leather, which remains in excellent condition. Rather unusually for an open body style, this car features a division window to offer privacy to rear occupants. Rear passengers are also treated to individual cigar lighters, foot rests and a lap blanket bar. Up front, the excellent dash features an original radio and good quality instrumentation and switchgear. The black canvas top is excellent and when folded, partially disappears behind the rear seats, lending the car a very sleek and finely resolved appearance whether open or closed. Mechanically, this Model K is in fine order, with the V12 engine running strong and returning very good performance. It drives well on the road, the sympathetic restoration helping to retain a good deal of the original character. The engine shows a fair amount of patina from use but remains tidy and clean, very well suited for touring and regular enjoyment. Thanks to its power and smooth running nature, the Lincoln K-Series is a favorite among tour enthusiasts. This car is a recognized Full Classic by the Classic Car Club of America and therefore eligible for their numerous events. Rare and handsomely presented, this Lincoln K would be a most welcome addition to a collection of Full Classic Lincolns or be a fine choice for any enthusiast seeking a beautiful, LeBaron designed, twelve-cylinder Lincoln to enjoy on the road.

    For sale
    $189,500(£0)
  • 1937 Rolls-Royce 25/30 Limousine

    For sale
    $49,500(£0)

    Rolls-Royce enjoyed great success with the 20/25, which had proven to be the best selling model in the marque’s history to date. However, as production continued, many owners who fitted large, heavy and luxurious bodies were left quite unsatisfied with the performance. In response, Rolls-Royce introduced the 25/30 which addressed those complaints directly with an enlarged version of the same inline-six cylinder engine, now displacing 4,257 c.c. The brakes were refined as well; a proven four-wheel system with mechanical servo that was built by Rolls-Royce under license from Hispano-Suiza. Other improvements included synchronizers on the top two gears, dual-coil ignition replacing the magneto, and tweaks to the four-wheel hydraulic shock absorbers. Performance was indeed improved, though the 25/30 ultimately proved a stop-gap model between the very popular 20/25 and the replacement Wraith. All told, a mere 1,200 examples were built before the Wraith (and the onset of World War II) ended production. As with all other Rolls-Royces of the period, the works only produced a running chassis. Bodies were outsourced to any number of traditional coachbuilders, with some being ordered by dealers such as Jack Barclay Ltd, while others were ordered directly by clients working with their favored coachbuilder. Our featured example is GRP41, a 1934 25/30 wearing formal Limousine coachwork by Park Ward. An older restoration, it presents in respectable condition with a very sound body, good paint and sound mechanical condition. The limousine body is formal and dignified, built with typical Park Ward quality and precision. It is finished in a two tone black-blue combination with red coach lines. The chassis, wheels, fenders and upper body are in black, accented with medium blue on the body sides. The paint, while older, remains in good condition, showing a few flaws and touchups in places. Black wire wheels and whitewall tires are in good order, again showing some patina but remaining fundamentally sound. The bodywork is solid and the doors and bonnet fit well with typical Rolls-Royce quality. Chrome is in average condition, and accessories include King of the Road headlamps and a single King of the Road spot lamp on the front apron. Dual sidemount spares are also fitted, and the body features an integrated boot. The driver’s compartment is trimmed correctly in black leather, which was harder wearing and favored by coachbuilders to withstand the rigors of the chauffeur’s duties. Black leather also adorns the front door panels and headlining. The materials are in good condition, showing some patina but also remaining sound and inviting. Wood trim on the dash and door caps is in good overall condition, largely intact and without any serious damage, though faded lacquer and some peeling is quite apparent. Rear passengers are separated via a retractable divider window and the cabin is trimmed in gray velour to mimic the original broadcloth. Upholstery quality is good, again showing some ageing but in sound order and quite usable as is. Carpets and headlining are very good while the wood trim is consistent with that in the front; showing some age and fading but largely intact. Under the bonnet rests the 4,257 c.c. inline-six cylinder engine. It is very nicely presented, having held up quite well since the restoration and showing moderate signs of use.  Likewise, the chassis and undercarriage appear in sound, complete condition as original. As expected from a 25/30, the robust six-cylinder engine runs well, starting readily and performing admirably. With only 1200 examples built and compared to the more plentiful 20/25, the 25/30 is a rare and desirable Rolls-Royce that still remains attainable by the average enthusiast. In mechanical terms, they are extremely robust and the understressed six-cylinder engine returns respectable performance and easy operation. With room for a family to enjoy, this example could make a fine choice for events such as the British Invasion or for RROC and CCCA CARavan tours.  

    For sale
    $49,500(£0)
  • 1934 Alvis Speed 20 Sports Tourer

    For sale
    $199,000(£0)

    Introduced in 1931, the Alvis Speed 20 proved to be a very popular model for the Coventry-based marque. Alvis had become known for their focus on exceptional quality engineering, handsome styling and a very high standard of quality. The second of four series of Speed 20 models, the SB Speed 20 featured a number of important refinements. It now featured a longer, reinforced chassis with Bijur lubrication, revised independent front suspension, Hartford Telecontrol dampers and steering and the world’s first fully synchronized four-speed transmission in a production motorcar. The Speed 20 was truly one of the most technologically advanced British cars of the era. Alvis’ proven 2.5 liter inline six remained largely unchanged, retaining its characterful nature and respectable performance. Buyers could specify their preferred coachbuilder, with many cars wearing “catalog” bodies by Charlesworth, Vanden Plas and, in the case of our subject car, Cross & Ellis. This 1934 Speed 20 SB is chassis number 11337, and is one of just 41 such cars built with the evocative, low slung and elegant Cross & Ellis Sports Tourer body. Of those, just 29 are known to still exist worldwide and this example is believed to be the only of its kind in the United States today. This wonderful car carries with it a fascinating and well documented history that begins with its dispatch on June 6, 1934 to Mann Egerton & Co. Ltd of Norfolk. It was assigned the original registration of NG7165, which it still proudly wears today. Original documents show the Speed 20 was delivered in green over green leather trim with body colored wheels and black weather equipment. Martin Hodson was first to take delivery of 11337, and he retained it for twenty five years before selling it to a Mr. G.B. Pearce, Esq, of Hampshire, England. Much of the car’s story comes to life with Mr. Pearce, who corresponded directly with the Alvis works for parts and mechanical advice. According to his letters, the Alvis was purchased after Hodson had a bit of a coming together with the scenery, and Pearce sought advice in its repair. After repairs, he sold the car on to Al Chambers of Powell, Ohio. Interestingly, Pearce stayed involved with the car’s maintenance and care, assisting Chambers with delivering components to Alvis and aiding in shipping. A delightful chain of correspondence between Chambers, Pearce and the Alvis Works is included in the history, covering much of Mr. Chambers’ efforts to rebuild the engine and drivetrain – including a receipt for $5.80 to cover the cost of Alvis opening and inspecting the gearbox. At one point, the Alvis representative talked Chambers out of replacing the original engine, convincing him a rebuild was far more economical. Thankfully Mr. Chambers agreed and the car retains its factory original unit to this day. Chassis 11337 then found its way to another enthusiastic Ohioan named Roy R. Tausch. Mr. Tausch fully enjoyed the Alvis, occasionally participating in vintage races at Nelson Ledges, Watkins Glen and Mid-Ohio. Delightful tales of his adventures with the car at the U.S. Vintage Grand Prix at Watkins Glen in 1977 are included in the history files. Following the passing of Mr. Tausch in 1982, the car was stored away in a barn on the family property. Rumors of its existence persisted, but Mr. Tausch’s widow vehemently refused to sell the car. Finally, in 2006, John Graham, an avid enthusiast of Red Triangle cars was on the property inspecting another car when he saw the silhouette of 11337 beneath a cover. He enquired if it was a Cross & Ellis Speed 20, and the family was suitably impressed with his deep appreciation and knowledge of the car. Mrs. Tausch agreed to sell the car to Graham, knowing it would be in good hands. Graham proved Mrs. Tausch right and soon shipped 11337 to New Zealand, into the hands of master restorers Errol and Rod Tempero who began a painstaking restoration to return the Alvis to its former glory. Some of the coachwork was fatigued beyond repair, and Rod Tempero hand-crafted beautiful new replacements using the originals as a guide. The quality of the work is superb, with beautiful quality finishes and paintwork and a strong focus on returning a great driving experience. The original engine was refurbished and finely tuned, and every effort was made to keep the chassis as close to original factory specification as possible. Full weather equipment was restored to original specifications in black canvas and the only deviations from original were the selection of fawn-colored leather trim and silver painted wire wheels, which Mr. Graham felt best highlighted the beautiful Cross & Ellis lines. Sadly, Mr. Graham did not have the opportunity to enjoy his freshly restored Alvis before he was required to sell it on. Thankfully, 11337’s most recent owner has kept this handsome and elegant Cross & Ellis tourer in fabulous order, maintaining the freshness of the restoration. The beautiful dark green paintwork remains excellent, with finishing and detailing executed to a very high standard. This rare and highly desirable Alvis Speed 20 is ready for enjoyment; quite simply a wonderful driving, and elegant touring car with a most fascinating history that serves to enhance its already charming character.

    For sale
    $199,000(£0)
  • 1947 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible

    For sale
    $117,500(£0)

    The end of World War II signaled a dramatic shift in the American auto industry. Car production had halted suddenly in 1942 as factories were retooled for the war effort. Now that the conflict was over, auto production could resume, but the problem for many was that design and development of new models had all but halted during the war, so most manufacturers had to make do with hastily refreshed versions of their existing pre-war models. In the case of Cadillac, however, the outlook was rather bright because that meant resuming production of the brilliant Series 62. For post-war models, the front end design was subtly reworked with a new grille, and the fender profile tweaked with beautiful effect. The proud grille and the flowing, beautifully contoured body would serve as the basis for Cadillac’s design language through the rest of the 1940s and into the early 50s. As was the norm for Cadillac, numerous body styles were available, with the convertible the ultimate of the two-door Series 62. Cadillac still considered itself “The Standard of the World” in this era, and the cars were lavishly equipped with automatic transmissions, the 346 cubic inch monoblock V8 engine, leather upholstery, power accessories and so forth. The model proved very popular with buyers, remaining essentially unchanged through 1947, with nearly 40,000 units of the Series 62 sold. Of that total, just 6,755 left the factory wearing the Model 6267 Convertible Coupe body. Today’s collectors covet the Series 62 convertible for its remarkable drivability, gorgeous lines and Full Classic status as sanctioned by the Classic Car Club of America. This beautiful 1947 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible benefits from a comprehensive, body-off restoration completed within the last few years. It is a well-sorted and fabulous driving example finished in a gorgeous shade of steel blue metallic over a dark blue interior and tan canvas top. A large cache of photos documenting the restoration process show the car was a complete and generally sound example to start with, before the body was removed from the chassis, and all components were stripped, refinished and rebuilt as necessary. The body was jigged and repaired before being refinished in this very attractive steely blue-gray shade. Receipts show a great number of original and NOS trim parts were sourced, and a new interior and top fabricated. The Cadillac presents in lovely condition, with the restoration still appearing crisp and attractive. Paint quality is very good atop straight and well-aligned panels, while the chrome and stainless brightwork is excellent. Riding on fresh Firestone 7.00 – 15 whitewall bias-ply tires with iconic “sombrero” hubcaps adorning the wheels, it sits properly on the road. Cadillac’s stunning original design looks particularly good in this dark color with a hint of metallic to catch the light. It is surely one of the most beautiful American cars of the era. As part of the restoration, the interior was completely retrimmed at great expense. Gorgeous dark blue leather covers the seats and door cards, accented with beige Bedford cord fabric on the seat backs and door panel inserts. Blue carpets are in excellent condition, protected by overmats, and the dash is painted to match the body. Leather on the seats is still in very fine order, showing only the very slightest bit of creasing in the driver’s seat from light use. The interior is well equipped with an original radio, power windows, and a quartz-converted original clock. The large and complex power-operated convertible top frame was fully disassembled and meticulously restored, with the chrome and paint finishes returned to original spec. This process alone accounted for many thousands of dollars and hundreds of hours of labor. The frame was then covered in a tan Stayfast canvas top, along with a matching fitted boot in the same material. The trunk is well detailed in correct materials and includes an original jack, spare, and spare wheel cover. As beautiful as it is to look at, this Cadillac truly shines on the road. It runs and drives exceptionally well, starting easily “on the button” and feeling very tight and well planted on the road. These cars are favorites of CCCA CARavan tourists, as they are recognized Full Classics and they reward drivers with their effortless cruising ability. As part of the comprehensive restoration, the suspension has been rebuilt and the engine runs very strong, with crisp shifts from the Hydra-matic automatic transmission. A new and properly detailed wiring harness from the experts at YnZ’s Yesterday’s Parts ensures the major electrical functions work as they should and the car remains reliable. Underhood detailing is good; showing some light use in places where the finishes have been affected by running, but it is generally very correct and tidy. The original oil bath air cleaner is intact, as is the original glass windscreen washer bottle and proper clamps and hardware. One of the newest cars eligible for CARavan touring, and a truly wonderful machine on the road, this well-presented and desirable Cadillac Series 62 Convertible is a very good example in beautiful colors that would be equally at home at a casual show or cruising effortlessly down the road.

    For sale
    $117,500(£0)
  • 1964 Volvo P1800 S Coupe

    For sale
    $69,500(£0)

    In 1960s Sweden, Volvo was well-established as a manufacturer of rugged, dependable cars with solid sporting credentials. But their slightly stodgy and austere appearance meant they were unfairly dismissed as quirky and eccentric, particularly among American buyers. But for those in the know, the PV444 and PV544 saloons were quite entertaining to drive and the Volvo four-cylinder engine was virtually bomb-proof and capable of making big power when tuned. In an effort to improve its sporting image, Volvo introduced the P1900 sports car, a fiberglass bodied machine with a tuned “B14” engine that produced 70 horsepower. Unfortunately, it did not live up to Volvo’s usual standard of quality and only 68 examples found buyers. Thankfully, Volvo did not give up at the first attempt and they quickly returned to the drawing board, commissioning a new car based on a shortened Amazon chassis with an all-new steel body. Several Italian design firms were courted to style the car, with the winning proposal penned at Carrozzeria Pietro Frua by a 24 year old Swede named Pelle Petterson, the son of a Volvo Exec who, rather conveniently, just happened to be on an internship at the Italian design firm. Frua constructed the first prototypes, and once the final design was approved, the next problem became where to build it. Volvo’s assembly plants were already at maximum capacity with other cars, so after consulting with several coachbuilding firms such as Karmann and Drauz, Volvo eventually struck a deal with Pressed Steel Company of West Bromwich, England to manufacture the major body components and Jensen Motors Limited to handle the final assembly. Soon, though, Volvo cited quality control problems with Pressed Steel, as well as the rising cost of shipping cars and parts back and forth from Sweden, so production of the P1800 S (for Sverige, or Sweden) came home Sweden to ensure more consistent quality. Volvo had a sensation on their hands which was only enhanced when a white P1800 became the chosen steed of Simon Templar, the fictional character played by Roger Moore in “The Saint”, a British television program about a dashing criminal/playboy who steals from the baddies to line his own pockets. From that moment forth, the Volvo P1800 has earned its place as a cultural icon for a great many men and women of a certain age. Exemplary in nearly every way, this 1964 Volvo P1800 S is one of the finest we have had the pleasure to offer. Built after August of 1963, this VD-series Swedish-built car has been restored to the original trim tag in the classic shade of Pearl White (Volvo code 79-1) over a red cockpit and is a beautiful example of this iconic sports car, in the colors and spec as preferred by Mr. Simon Templar himself. A full, professional restoration has been lavished upon it, and it presents in superlative condition throughout. The white paintwork is outstanding, laid down on absolutely straight panels with excellent body fit. Chrome plating is to show-quality standards and the steel wheels wear correct style original hubcaps with trim rings and properly sized rubber for just the right stance. It is a beautifully presented car, with fine detailing and presentation. In the stylish 2+2 cockpit, red upholstery (Volvo Code 307-265, per the trim tag) offsets the white paintwork beautifully, and is in very fine order. The material on the seats is excellent, showing little in the way of use. Likewise, two tone door panels are excellent and the dash is fitted with the beautiful, signature blue-faced instruments and a period correct Blaupunkt AM/FM radio. Other pleasing touches include the original steering wheel and a pair of factory original shoulder belts – Volvo has always been about safety, after all. The boot is lined in red carpeting per original, and a rare Volvo-branded cover adorns the spare tire. The engine bay is exquisitely detailed, with Volvo’s robust B18 engine presenting in show-quality condition. Paint finishes are correct on the block, head and ancillaries, the twin S.U. Carburetors have been beautifully polished and correct hoses, fittings and hardware are found throughout. The engine is mated to a four-speed manual box with electric overdrive for effortless cruising. The P1800 S is a wonderful, slightly off-beat 60s sports car that returns surprisingly good performance and handling. This example is no exception; the high-quality restoration translates into a car that drives and feels delightfully solid and planted with that signature Swedish robustness. Desirable and highly collectible, this stylish Volvo P1800 S is surely one of the finest of its kind on offer today.

    For sale
    $69,500(£0)
  • 1936 Rolls-Royce Phantom III Coupe

    For sale
    $450,000(£0)

    Filling the shoes of the outgoing Phantom II would be no easy task for Rolls-Royce. The PII had proven to be one of the marques more successful models, firmly establishing it as the leader in the world luxury motorcar market. But as Rolls-Royce was enjoying their status as the maker of the world’s finest automobiles, even they weren’t immune to pressure from the competition. With the introduction of the Phantom III in 1936, Rolls-Royce joined the multi-cylinder race that was spurred on by the likes of Cadillac, Pierce-Arrow, Hispano-Suiza and Packard. Replacing the venerable inline six that traced its roots to the Ghost was an all-new, clean-sheet design V12 engine constructed of aluminum alloy and displacing 7.32 liters, or 447 cubic inches. While the V12 layout was certainly a departure for the company in terms of road car power, it was not at all unfamiliar territory given their vast experience with aero engines of the same configuration, and many of the Phantom III engine’s features borrowed heavily from the firm’s aviation experience. The Phantom III was the final car to be designed under the auspices of Sir Henry Royce, though sadly he would die before the car would reach its final stages of design and production. As typical, Rolls Royce supplied running chassis to clients and dealers, so cars were despatched to coachbuilders chosen by clients or dealers. Of the great traditional British coachbuilders, Barker was one of the oldest and most revered. Founded in 1710, the firm employed top craftsmen who produced the finest, most lavish carriages available, many of which featuring ground-breaking designs. The founder of Barkers, formerly an officer in Queen Anne’s Guard, utilized his contacts within the Royal Family to secure many high-profile contracts, producing numerous carriages for King George III and Queen Victoria. They made the natural transition to motor bodies at the turn of the 20th century, going on to produce distinctly elegant bodies for a number of cars, with a heavy emphasis on Rolls-Royce and Bentley chassis. This 1936 Rolls-Royce Phantom III, chassis 3BU2 was the very first B-series Phantom III delivered and wears distinct and beautiful one-off coachwork by Barker. The Two-Seat Sports Coupe body is a rather unusual style for the Phantom III, as the flagship chassis was generally fitted with large multi-passenger bodies. A stunningly beautiful car, it is one of four fixed-head coupes supplied by Barker on the PIII chassis, and the only one to feature a Dickey seat and rear mounted spare wheel. This example was sold new in March of 1937 to a Mrs. Frances Bell, wife of Dr. Dennistoun Mildeberger Bell of Amangansett, New York. A photo of the car when new can be found in Lawrence Dalton’s book, Rolls Royce: The Derby Phantoms (p. 375). It is not known how long the car was in the possession of the somewhat eccentric Bell family, but it remained on the East Coast of the U.S. for much of its life. In more recent years, it received a cosmetic restoration in England, and then returned to the United States where it received a mechanical restoration by the highly regarded Phantom III experts at Dennison-Jayne Motors of West Chester, Pennsylvania. Today, this remarkable Rolls-Royce Phantom III presents in handsome condition, its older restoration and paintwork having held up quite well, though showing a few minor flaws upon closer inspection. The two-tone paintwork suits the handsome Barker coachwork very well, with black wings and top surfaces accented with deep burgundy body sides and gold coach stripes to provide a visual break between the two. Paint quality and body fitment are very good. The coachwork is decidedly sporting, particularly for a PIII, with Lucas Tri-Bar headlamps, a single center-mounted spot lamp, kneeling Spirit of Ecstasy mascot, black-wall Michelin tires, and polished wheel discs. A single, rear-mounted spare wheel enclosed in a painted metal cover keeps the body-sides, adding a unique touch to the Barker design. The lush and luxurious cabin is trimmed in burgundy leather and wool carpet, highlighted with gorgeous, restored burl wood. The leather is in very good condition, showing some age since the restoration but remaining handsome and quite presentable, particularly against the beautifully restored wooden dash and door caps. It is fitted with an original Clayton heater, as noted in the build sheet; a sensible upgrade given its original delivery to the North East of the USA. The cabin is comfortable and inviting, with a welcoming patina and fine detailing. Mechanically, this twelve-cylinder Rolls-Royce benefits from $150,000 worth of extensive servicing by Dennison Motors. The mechanical restoration of the original engine (number V.98.F) included fitting of new pistons, rings, wrist pins, and cylinder liners. The camshaft was re-profiled and the valvetrain converted to more reliable roller-type cam followers, and the favored hydraulic tappets remain in place. All major ancillaries were rebuilt at the time, such as the water pump, oil pump, flywheel, distributor and carburetor. At the same time, the clutch was rebuilt and relined, all new mountings fitted and the body rewired. The Bijur lubrication system was also overhauled in conjunction with a front-end and brake system rebuild. In the time since this overhaul, it has been sparingly used and continues to be an excellent driving example. Included in the sale are Rolls-Royce Owner's Club documents that help define the history of this lovely motorcar. A copy of the original build sheet as supplied by the Rolls-Royce Foundation is also included, verifying this as a numbers-matching and highly correct example. This handsome, beautifully presented one-off Phantom III is a rare and highly desirable sporting model, comprehensively serviced by marque experts in order to resolve typical PIII mechanical trouble areas, and it remains in fine order, ready for regular enjoyment on tours and driving events.

    For sale
    $450,000(£0)
  • 1929 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newmarket Phaeton

    For sale
    $198,500(£0)

    After the Silver Ghost had fully cemented Rolls-Royce’s status as constructor of the world’s finest motorcars, the company began the difficult task of engineering a worthy replacement. The Silver Ghost chassis was incredibly over-designed and built to a standard that was virtually unmatched by its rivals, so the task of improving it would be certainly be a challenge. Rolls-Royce had to make sure the new car lived up to the lofty standards it had set with the Silver Ghost, and far exceed the demands of their exclusive clientele. The Ghost’s replacement was developed in intense secrecy, with the project even gaining a code name of “Easter Armoured Car” to throw off potential industrial spies. Once revealed, the New Phantom made headlines with its 7.7 liter inline-six, a development of the Ghost’s unit but heavily reworked to feature advanced pushrod-actuated overhead valves. The block was cast in alloy, with the cylinder head cast in iron on early cars, which was switched to aluminum alloy after 1928 to correct corrosion issues. Suspension, steering and brakes were an evolution of the Ghost’s but thoroughly improved to provide more modern ride and handling and to ensure stopping power in keeping with the new, more powerful engine. Thanks to the success of the Silver Ghost, an assembly plant had already been established in Springfield, Massachusetts to build cars specifically for American buyers. The New Phantom debuted in 1925 (only renamed Phantom I following the arrival of the Phantom II), and by 1926, they were leaving the Springfield works to very strong demand. A vast array of catalog body styles were offered, with the famous coachbuilders at Brewster getting a large number of contracts for the Springfield cars, which was only natural as Brewster had come under the control of Rolls Royce in 1925. Between 1926 and 1931, 1,241 Phantom 1s left the Springfield works. One of the most handsome and elegant Brewster designs for the Phantom 1 was the All Weather Phaeton; officially known as the Newmarket in Brewster’s catalog. In the tradition of the American convertible sedan, the Newmarket is full convertible that when open, looks like a sporting Phaeton, but is fitted with roll up glass windows and foldable B-pillars that when in place, lend the appearance of a formal sedan and provide excellent protection from unpleasant weather. This fine example is chassis number S138FR, a 1929 model that benefits from many of the factory upgrades made through the course of production, including the desirable alloy cylinder head. According to the Schoellkopf Card provided by the Rolls Royce Owner's Club, this car was originally delivered to a Mrs. C. Rosenbloom of New York, and fitted with an Etoile body. The car was sold in 1931 and, as was common practice, a new body was fitted to suit the new owner's tastes. In this case, it was refitted with the elegant Brewster Newmarket body it still wears today. Finished elegantly in all-black livery with a striking polished reveal, this handsome motorcar wears an older restoration that does shows some light patina in places, yet remains very attractive. The quality of the restoration is very good, with excellent panel fit and fine detailing. A CCCA 1st Place badge attests to the fact that the car was restored properly when it was done. It is well accessorized with dual sidemount spare wheels, dual horns, and a covered trunk on the original trunk rack.  The black paintwork is in fine order, with good quality bodywork lending straight and deep reflections. Subtle red coachstripes accent the black and polished alloy beautifully. Inside, black leather trim is attractive and lightly care worn, showing some use since the restoration. Seats, carpets and door cards are free of any damage or issues, and the cabin is a marvelous place to spend a day or more touring the countryside. Correct original instrumentation resides in the polished wood dash and Rolls-Royce’s signature aircraft-quality switchgear remains in excellent order. The Phantom benefits from a conventional drive arrangement, with traditional three pedals and a center mounted gear lever, allowing for easy operation in modern conditions. The convertible top wears new black canvas upholstery, and the mechanism works as it should. A matching canvas boot covers the works when in the open position and an upholstered trunk cover ties the look together nicely. Out on the road is where this example truly excels. The well detailed and correctly presented 7.7 liter inline-six delivers endless torque and exceptional smoothness, which allows drivers to simply select top gear and motor virtually anywhere without shifting. This car has been very well sorted and cruises effortlessly, the strong engine backed by tight suspension and powerful brakes. Versatile and desirable coachwork, a nicely mellowed and handsome restoration and excellent mechanical condition come together in a wonderful Phantom I that is a prime candidate for RROC tours, CCCA CARavan tours, or other casual shows and events.

    For sale
    $198,500(£0)
  • 1952 Jaguar XK 120 "Clark Gable's"

    For sale
    $425,000(£0)

      Brothers George and Sam Barris were car nuts from their earliest days. As a young boy living in California, the younger George would build balsa wood model cars and carefully customize them, paying close attention to detail and form, winning multiple contests with his work. The first real car he and his brother restored was a 1925 Buick they received as payment for their labor in a family restaurant. They immediately began changing its appearance, making subtle improvements and experimentations… and with that, Barris Custom was born. The brothers opened the Barris Custom Shop when George was just 18, and began doing bodywork and mild customizing for their friends and school mates. Their first major breakthrough came in 1951 when a customer named Bob Hirohata ordered a custom Mercury from Barris Customs after seeing one Sam had built for himself. The resulting car, which became known simply as “The Hirohata Merc” is widely regarded today as one of the most important custom cars in history. When new, it was shown at the Detroit Motorama where the exquisite style and craftsmanship overshadowed much of the work by Detroit’s top designers. The success of the Hirohata Merc drew newfound attention to their shop and orders from California’s elite began pouring in. While George would eventually become known for his wild, over-the-top “Kustoms” and kitschy movie cars, his early work was substantially more subdued and finely considered. One early customer of note was the famed Hollywood superstar Clark Gable. Beyond his on-and-off screen exploits, Gable was extremely well known as a collector of the finest automobiles. Throughout the course of his illustrious career, Gable owned several Duesenbergs (including a Model JN and an SSJ), a Packard Eight Convertible Victoria, and both a Mercedes Benz 300Sc and 300SL Gullwing, among many others. When Jaguar unveiled their sensational new XK120 in 1948, Gable was smitten by the stunning new machine from Coventry, England, and he soon appeared in person at International Motors on Wilshire Boulevard in Hollywood to insist that HE would be the recipient of the very first XK120 delivered on the West Coast. Gable would go on to own two other XK120s, one of which was a gift by Tony Hulman of Indianapolis Motor Speedway fame, and would remain in Indy for its whole life. While his last XK120 was a 1952 model which he promptly handed over to George and Sam for the Barris Customs touch, and is the subject we proudly feature here. Clark Gable was certainly no wallflower, but as evident from his other famous cars, he had restrained and sophisticated tastes when it came to motoring. Because of this, he didn’t go crazy with the XK120, instead relying on George Barris to subtly refine the shape of the already gorgeous standard XK120. Starting with a stock 1952 Open Two Seat model on steel wheels with rear wheel spats, Barris began at the front end by shaving the trim from the headlights, as well as smoothing the front fenders by shaving off the turn signal plinths. The wing mirrors were removed and holes filled, while the body sides are essentially left alone to highlight the beautiful original shape. Around the back, the boot lid is shaved, save for the handle, and the license plate relocated down low. A removable hard top was built to appear like a Carson Top, which features a full headlining and a leather trimmed parcel shelf that complements the red upholstery. To finish it off, a pair of subtle Barris Custom Cars badges were affixed to the cowl below the windscreen posts. The overall effect is quite understated, highlighting the beauty of the basic XK120 form quite brilliantly. Upon its discovery in 2010, this very important Jaguar XK120 was sent to marque expert Jim Kakuska of JK Restorations in Oswego, Illinois where it received a stunning restoration to concours standards. It presents today in beautiful condition, with the lovely paint color reminiscent of Jaguar’s own Opalescent Sand. The body and paint are finished to concours-quality levels, the panel fit is outstanding and the long, sweeping body sides are exceptionally straight. The car retains the original steel wheels and wheel spats which, combined with the subtle Barris touches just make this XK120 look impossibly sleek and beautiful. Chrome plating on the delicate bumpers, windscreen frame, wheels and minor fittings is all of show-quality. This car is a numbers-matching example with a Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust Certificate as well as a certificate of authenticity from Barris Kustoms to confirm its incredible pedigree. As with the body, the interior was restored to a very high level in correct red leather trim on the seats and door cards, along with proper red cockpit rails, dash and wool carpeting. The quality, fit and finish are outstanding. The Barris-designed, Carson-style hard top was restored to original spec, trimmed in tan canvas to give the appearance of a soft top (there is no folding soft-top fitted). The inside of the top is lined in red, with the distinct parcel shelf area covered in leather to match the seats. Otherwise, the interior is standard fare XK120 OTS, just restored to concours quality. The outstanding quality continues when lifting the bonnet to reveal the original 3.4 liter XK six-cylinder engine. Topped with signature polished alloy cam covers, it breathes through correct S.U. Carburetors and proper porcelain exhaust manifolds. As one would expect from a specialist restoration, the detailing is to a very high standard and the engine bay is simply gorgeous to look at. It is a very strong running car as well, having been well-sorted since the restoration and is highly enjoyable to drive. The car comes to us fresh from the lawn at the 2017 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, and the sale will include the aforementioned Heritage Certificate and Barris Documentation, as well as copies of period photographs of Mr. Gable with this XK120. This very special and truly unique Jaguar XK120 benefits not only from a fascinating history, but also from a truly world-class restoration by respected marque experts, and is certain to qualify for virtually prestigious concours or road event worldwide.    

    For sale
    $425,000(£0)
  • 1931 Marmon Sixteen Roadster

    For sale
    $395,000(£0)

    Discussions of the great American automobile companies will likely include the mentions of Packard, Duesenberg, and Cadillac, while firms with illustrious histories like Marmon often get left in the shadows, despite their enormous contributions to motoring history. Cars such as the Model 34 pioneered the use of aluminum as a weight saver in engine blocks, bodies and chassis. The Model 34 helped to solidify Marmon’s reputation in sport, where they famously achieved such feats such as setting the “Cannonball” coast-to-coast record. Marmon’s most famous motorsport victory came at the hands of company engineer and retired racer Ray Harroun who, driving the famous Marmon Wasp, won the very first Indianapolis 500 Mile Race in 1911. In the late 1920s and early 1930s, Marmon was still best known for building luxurious, high performance motorcars to take on the likes of Packard and Cadillac. Development of their revolutionary V16 engine began as early as 1927, but production was not realized until 1931. Cadillac had beaten Marmon to market with its own V16 engine, and Peerless was working on one of their own, both of which were not-coincidentally designed by ex-Marmon engineers. Regardless, the Marmon Sixteen was a gorgeous engine, an 8.0 liter, 491 cubic inch aluminum unit that produced a full 200 horsepower, handily surpassing the output of Cadillac’s sixteen. The powerful, beautiful Marmon Sixteen was produced for just three years, and with only 390 built, it remains one of the most desirable and storied automobiles of the classic era. This incredible 1931 Marmon Sixteen Low Boy Roadster is one of the most uniquely jaw-dropping machines we’ve had the pleasure to offer. It is a stunning work of art, built to the highest of standards using genuine Marmon components throughout the build. The story of this remarkable car began as many similar projects do, with a casual conversation between father and son that started with “Wouldn’t it be cool if…”  In this case, the subject was the Marmon Sixteen; an automobile they thought would make the ultimate hot rod purely because of that gorgeous and powerful engine. As owners of two Marmon Sixteens, it was unthinkable to cut an existing car, but a family friend, who also happened to be a Marmon expert and owner of a great number of original parts, offered them a project of his own – a rough 1931 Marmon Sixteen rolling chassis, less body. No real history was known on the car, and with 90% of the body missing, it was the perfect basis for them to embark on their project. Despite it being a derelict chassis with just the engine, radiator, cowl and doors, the Marmon rather surprisingly was fired up and driven onto a trailer. From there it began its remarkable transformation in the hands of this father and son team, with help from Hot Rod Garage of Sand Springs, OK. Engine, driveline and suspension components were all rebuilt and restored, with careful attention paid to each nut and bolt to ensure world-class, concours level finishes. Special care was given to preserve as many original Marmon components as possible, with a number of new parts purchased from marque experts. As the chassis was assembled, components were carefully enhanced with a traditional hot rodder’s approach. As a result, the engine, chassis, gearbox, brakes and rear axle are all original Marmon parts, restored to perfection and beautifully presented. Using the lower section of a genuine Marmon coupe as a template, a new steel body was fabricated from scratch to sit atop the chassis. The beautiful body features laser-precise panel fit, while original Marmon hardware was used in every possible area. Root Beer brown paintwork is stunning, again finished to concours standard by Hot Rod Garage. Stunning details include the leather and stainless spring straps that hold the hood in place, show-quality plating on the grille slats, and the air cleaners for the triple carbs subtly breaching the surface of the hood. Original door handles were utilized, while the rumble seat has been shaved, and is opened with an electric solenoid. The car sits low and long on its 145-inch chassis, riding on one piece polished Billet wheels, made especially for the car by EVOD in Los Angeles using the original Marmon artillery wheels as a template, and wider in the rear for that quintessential Hot Rod stance. The magnificent, 491 cubic-inch V16 engine is no doubt the star of the show. It is exquisitely detailed, with stunning, custom fabricated exhaust headers, polished valve covers, and a trio of Stromberg DDR2 carburetors atop a custom manifold. The masterpiece is shown to the world via the simple hood, sans side panels for all to see the stunning craftsmanship. All of the work performed is simply beautiful, and yet the car remains completely functional as well thanks to the expertly restored original drivetrain and chassis. The cockpit features lovely beige leather trim with simple pleating on the seats and door cards that reflect the uncluttered elegance of the exterior. Incredibly, the dash features original Marmon instruments in an engine turned fascia panel. The owners even went so far as to retain the Marmon steering wheel and shifter. Even the door latches and hinges are original, NOS Marmon pieces. This was clearly a labor of love that is both fresh and creative, yet pays respectful tribute to the original car. Following its completion, the Marmon Low Boy has only participated in one major show, the 2011 Grand National Roadster Show. All aspects of the build from start to finish are documented and presented in a bespoke book. Since the Roadster Show, it has been shown only casually at local events and used sparingly, kept in a climate controlled private museum. It remains in stunning condition, still appearing fresh and ready for show and enjoyment. This is a one-of-a-kind opportunity to acquire a breathtaking and truly unique piece of rolling art work that seamlessly melds the American Classic Era with the great American tradition of Hot Rodding.

    For sale
    $395,000(£0)
  • 1931 Auburn 8-98 Convertible Phaeton

    For sale
    $169,500(£0)

    E.L. Cord’s takeover of Auburn in 1924 was exactly what the Indiana-based manufacturer needed to turn around its faltering fortunes. After years of building good quality but rather staid cars, E.L. Cord transformed them into one of the most exciting American automobile companies of the time. Cord focused on style and value, literally using bright color schemes to shift unsold inventory before redesigning the entire range. The new models under his guise used engines supplied by Lycoming (who also happened to be part of Cord’s ever-growing business empire), and Auburn established itself as a leader in the entry-level luxury market, with some of the most affordable and stylish 8-cylinder cars in the segment. Despite the onset of the Great Depression and slow sales in the previous few years, Auburn was enjoying quite a renaissance in 1931 thanks to the 8-98 (8 cylinders, 98 horsepower). The powerful new Lycoming straight-eight engine was paired with a rigid X-braced chassis of 127 inches in wheelbase. The revised chassis featured Lovejoy hydraulic shock absorbers, and a Bijur lubrication system that made maintenance a breeze. A line of fabulous new bodies from Cord-owned coachbuilders brought sophisticated Hollywood style to the streets, all at a price that made them some of the most affordable 8-cylinder cars of the day. The most famous and overtly sporting of the new design Auburns was the Boat Tail Speedster, thought the 8-98 was also available as a fully closed sedan and a strikingly handsome and versatile Convertible Phaeton. Regardless of the body style, Auburn offered a high quality and stylish automobile at an incredibly attractive price. This 1931 Auburn 8-98 wears desirable and fetching Convertible Phaeton coachwork. The restoration, while older, was performed by marque expert Randy Ema and it remains in fine condition throughout thanks to recent refreshing. It is presented in a striking two-tone red and burgundy color scheme, with a dark red body is subtly highlighted by deep burgundy fenders and feature lines, while bright red striping ties the scheme together. The bright and sporty color scheme is further enhanced by beautiful chrome wire wheels fitted with double-whitewall tires. This CCCA Senior Award-winning example has been very well restored and maintained by a series of notable enthusiasts, including Tom Kemp, Chris Logan, James Couzens and ACD Club stalwarts Gary and Cheryl Howe who enjoyed the car in a great many club activities. This Auburn is very well detailed, presenting in crisp and attractive condition and accessorized with dual sidemount spare wheels, chrome headlamps, dual chrome horns, a single Pilot Ray spot light, body-color radiator louvers, and a winged goddess mascot. Panel fit is very good, paint is gorgeous, and the overall quality is that of a car that was beautifully restored and enjoyed with care and respect. Dark tan leather upholstery is in similarly fine condition, having taken on a light patina, remaining supple and free of any damage. Dark brown carpets are also in fine condition, showing only minimal wear. Chrome trim tops the dash, which is again in very nice condition with original instrumentation in a textured alloy fascia. The interior color is very well judged against the paint, and well-presented thanks to the high quality restoration. A fresh tan top in Haartz canvas has been recently fitted, and is in excellent condition. Mechanically, it is in good order with a well-presented Lycoming straight-eight that is nicely detailed and strong running. These engines are very stout, delivering healthy doses of torque to allow for easy cruising. Paint finishes are very good, with no apparent peeling or chipping on the block or head. Hose clamps and hardware are of the correct type and the engine remains very clean and tidy, showing careful use and care over the years. With good history from noted ACD enthusiasts and a restoration by one of the most respected names in the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg field, this stylish and sound 8-98 Convertible Phaeton is certain to please its next caretaker. Long on style and very desirable among collectors, this fine example is prime for CCCA CARavan tours, AACA events and or for simple enjoyment on the road.

    For sale
    $169,500(£0)
  • 1940 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible Coupe

    For sale
    $69,500(£0)

    The 1940 Cadillac Series 62 marked an interesting transition for Cadillac. On one hand, it was the first year for this new model, the entry level of the Cadillac range that replaced the Series 60. It was also a car that represented an early form of “platform sharing” among General Motors products, as it shared its basic configuration with the Buick Roadmaster and Oldsmobile Series 90 among others. Exclusively for Cadillac, the body was given a wide-shoulder design that eliminated the need for large exterior running boards and lent the car a striking and modern appearance. On the other side of the coin, the 1940 models marked the end of the traditional classic era styling once and for all. The tall upright center grille was still flanked by separately mounted headlamps and “waterfall” grilles in the front wings. It was no doubt a handsome car, but the follow year saw the introduction of the new front end design with integrated headlamps and a low, wide grille. In effect, the 1941 models overshadowed the 1940 cars, but when looking back, the 1940 Cadillac Series 62 can be seen as the ultimate expression of the Art Deco and Classic Eras, a beautiful machine with fabulously detailed and streamlined front end design that was both imposing and elegant. Mechanically, the Series 62 utilized the proven and powerful 346 cubic inch Monoblock, L-head V8 engine. Customers could choose between a synchronized 3-speed manual or 4-speed Hydra-Matic automatic gearbox. With 135 horsepower on tap, the performance was quite strong and these cars have always been appreciated for their fine road manners and handling. Customers loved the new Series 62, as it delivered Cadillac’s traditional quality and style in an attainable package. As a result, sales skyrocketed for both 1940 and 1941, though Series 62 production was cut short in 1942 to concentrate on the war effort. This 1940 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible is an attractive and usable example of this sought-after pre-war Cadillac. We are very pleased to offer this car on behalf of the CCCA Educational Foundation, to which 100% of proceeds from the sale will benefit. This is a sound and solid car, presented in an attractive color combination of cream over red wheels and a red interior. Paintwork is shiny and sound, and while there are some imperfections to be found, it is generally rather good looking with nice paint on straight, solid panels. It sits proudly on proper steel wheels with original-type hub caps and wide whitewall tires. The chrome is generally fair with straight bumpers and good exterior trim, though there is some significant pitting on the die-cast grille that would benefit from restoration. The spacious interior is in good condition, trimmed in red and gray upholstery on the seats and door panels, with very good red carpeting. Interior fittings and controls all appear in good condition, with attractive, largely original chrome as well as original instruments, switchgear and a lovely ivory Bakelite steering wheel. This car is equipped with a 3-speed manual transmission, heater and radio. The convertible top, trimmed in tan canvas, is in good condition and complements the paintwork well. Cadillac’s 346 Monoblock V8 is tidy and clean in the engine bay, and while it isn’t fully detailed, it is clean and well-presented. It runs and drives quite well, delivering the easy-going road manners these cars are so well known for. This is a car that appears to have never been fully restored, instead getting restoration work done as needed over the years. As a result, it retains an appealing patina, runs and drives quite well and would make for a very nice tour car. It is also a CCCA-approved Full Classic so it is eligible for CARavan Tours and other similar events. This is a great example of a late pre-war Cadillac for an enthusiast seeking a car to drive and enjoy on a regular basis. An added bonus is that every dollar of the purchase price will benefit the CCCA Education Foundation, which works to continually promote our hobby for years to come.

    For sale
    $69,500(£0)
  • 1936 Pierce-Arrow Twelve Town Car

    For sale
    $249,500(£0)

    In 1930, Cadillac spawned a multi-cylinder race among manufacturers, with Packard and Lincoln quick to respond to Cadillac’s own Sixteen with their own V12 engines, and Marmon matching Cadillac with a superb V16 of its own. Pierce-Arrow, once one of the most storied luxury motorcar manufacturers in America, was working hard to keep up with the rapid pace of development among competitors. They had earned a reputation for quality that was virtually unmatched, boasting impressive customer loyalty. Pierce-Arrow was finally able to react to Cadillac’s flagships in 1932 with the introduction of a line of V12 engines. Power output of 150 horsepower for the larger unit was very respectable, but for the following year, Pierce dropped that smaller engine for a 462 cubic inch unit producing a full 175 horsepower to match the output of the benchmark Cadillac Sixteen. But the Great Depression had been hard on Pierce Arrow, and they began to shed money at an alarming rate. A group of New York bankers was called in to bail out the firm, which resulted in a forced and major restructuring. Pierce-Arrow introduced their last all-new model in 1936. The bodies were redesigned, with styling that kept the signature faired-in headlamps but was altogether more streamlined, sweeping and modern. The 1936-38 cars were given a distinctive four headlights arrangement that sets them apart from earlier models. Mechanically, the cars were improved with an overdrive transmission and vacuum-boosted brakes as standard equipment, with eight and twelve cylinder engines offered. The 1936 Pierce-Arrows were among the finest cars the company had produced, but the writing was on the wall, and they would only build cars through the 1937 and 1938 seasons before the company was declared insolvent; its machinery, dies and stores all tragically being scrapped a few years later for the War effort. This magnificent 1936 Pierce-Arrow Twelve is a very special automobile wearing one-off coachwork built by Derham Body Company per a commission by the Pierce factory. Pierce-Arrow generally favored Brunn for their production bodies, but Derham Body Company of Rosemont, Pennsylvania was likely chosen for this flagship design because of their impeccable reputation for quality, attention to detail and style. This unique Town Car was built with the intention of offering it as a premier “catalog custom” for top tier clientele, however, given the tumultuous financial state of the firm, the body was never cataloged for the 1937 model year and this remains the only example produced. After being shown, it was sold by the factory to the flamboyant and wealthy Charles Cobb Walker of Manchester, Massachusetts, one of the factory’s best customers in its later years; he bought three Pierces in 1936 and 1937, reportedly going so far as to arrange for consecutive serial numbers. In the years following the Second World War, Walker’s estate, including the three Pierces, was sold to lumber magnate John Grossman, who then sold our subject Derham Town Car on, where it found several short term owners. It eventually was acquired by Loren Holland of New York who sold it to a noted Pierce-Arrow enthusiast Bob Sands in 1975.  Over the course of the next seven years, this Pierce Town Car received an award-winning restoration. In 1990, it was featured in The Classic Car, Beverly Rae Kimes’s famous book, in which Mr. Sands noted, “It drives and rides like a Pullman car. Its looks, appointments, styling, and quality can be best summed up as the closest an automobile can get to a palace on wheels.” The next owner was the late Roy Warshawsky, founder of the legendary mail order auto parts company J.C. Whitney, and a highly respected car collector. More restoration work was done by Warshawsky before passing the car on to Oklahoma’s John Groendyke, where it was continually shown, racking up top honors from the Antique Automobile and Classic Car Clubs of America as well as the Pierce Arrow Society. It remains resplendent in its dark blue livery striped in silver and with beautiful plating and fine quality detailing. The paintwork, while older, remains very attractive thanks to the expert attention it has received in the hands of these famous collectors. Durham’s design is superb in its clean and elegant appeal, the unique rear roof treatment being a notable highlight. The driver’s compartment is appointed in businesslike blue leather, with a full array of original instruments and original controls. The rear cabin is trimmed in wool broadcloth, with beautiful blue carpeting and luxuriously equipped with a foot rest, jump seats, divider window, coach lamps, and a height adjustable rear cushion. All soft trim and cabin details remain in very fine order. Pierce Arrow’s magnificent V12 engine is gorgeous to look at and runs in virtual silence, with turbine smoothness and impressive power. Undoubtedly one of the most significant and attractive formal-bodied Pierce-Arrows, this fabulous and one-of-a-kind motorcar boasts a superb history and a quality restoration with which few can compare.

    For sale
    $249,500(£0)
  • 1931 Packard 845 Deluxe Eight Coupe Roadster

    For sale
    $249,500(£0)

    The Packard 8th Series made its debut on August 14, 1931 at a time when the automaker was beginning to face serious competition from its cross-town rivals at Cadillac. While Packard had remained sales leader through 1930, Cadillac’s twelve and sixteen cylinder engines as well as the value LaSalle brand began to pose a serious threat. But Packard soldiered on, and with the 8th series, they continued their traditional approach with impeccably built, beautifully styled automobiles with an unerring sense of quality. The practice of offering buyers standard and semi-custom bodies continued, with fabulous styles by the likes of LeBaron, Rollston, Dietrich and Derham gracing the flagship 145-inch Deluxe Eight chassis. Of the variety of body styles and configurations available, it is the elegant convertible coupe by LeBaron that stood out among the most attractive and desirable. It boasted distinctive lines, including a wide beltline molding, attractively sloping doors, elegantly sloping rear deck, and a distinctive convertible top that folded flush with the body, for a clean smooth line all the way through the car. The design was so attractive that it would later be borrowed by Packard, almost point-for-point, to become the factory’s production coupe roadster body of 1932–1934. Only three such LeBaron-bodied Deluxe Eight Convertible Coupes are known to survive today. Our featured example, riding on the 145-inch wheelbase chassis, presents in handsome condition, wearing an older but high quality restoration and benefitting from some recent freshening. The firewall plate identifies the car as having been delivered new on February 10, 1931 by the legendary Earle C. Anthony Packard dealership in Oakland, California. An unusual and rarely seen secondary tag denotes the car was resold as a “Used Packard” via a Chicago dealer on March 14, 1933, indicating the car had relocated to the Midwest early in its life. Further investigation of the component numbers on the engine, frame and steering box reveals them to be in very close sequence, indicating they are original to this particular car. Its early life is as-yet unknown, but this fabulous Packard surfaced in the 1950s, as an excellent original car, when it became part of the well-known enthusiast Wayne Merriman’s collection. Merriman sold the car in the 1960s to the former Classic Car Club of America President Gene Perkins of Indiana. Mr. Perkins had the car restored by a friend, though it was reportedly in very good order to begin with. He kept the car for many years, and during his tenure, it was featured in Hugo Pfau’s book, The Coach-Built Packard. Today, this fine Packard presents in lovely condition throughout. It retains its original body, which is finished in a unique creamy tan color with medium tan body lines. The feature lines subtly outline the body sides, with the arrow-like speedform at the leading edge of the bonnet lending a sensation of motion even while sitting still. It is a subdued but very attractive color combination, with the bright red wire wheels and blackwall tires giving the car a sporty and purposeful appearance. The distinctive body is fitted with a trunk, rather than a typical rumble seat, which is believed to be a unique feature of this example. A trunk rack provides room for additional carrying capacity, allowing copious luggage space for long-distance touring. Dual side mount spares wear body-colored covers with lovely chrome tops. Dual, steerable Pilot Ray driving lamps, a Goddess of Speed mascot, radiator stone guard, and freshly re-chromed bumpers add some additional flash without taking away from the stunning LeBaron lines. A true two-seat Packard roadster, the cozy cabin is trimmed in tan leather with complementing door panels and dark brown carpets. Upholstery quality is very good, showing light signs of use, but generally good and tidy and appearing well kept since the restoration was completed. The wood-grained dash panel is fitted with original instruments and Jaeger clock as well as a rare Earl C. Anthony service plaque. Packard’s 385 Cubic Inch inline-eight cylinder engine is well-presented, showing signs of use but remaining in good, tidy order with correct Packard Green paint and black porcelain manifolds. The 8th series engine featured some of the improvements made for the 745 Speedster, and produced a healthy 120 horsepower. This car runs and drives very well, having benefitted from fettling by the experts at Stone Barn Restorations in 2016. This beautiful LeBaron creation served as the prototype for 1932-1934 Packard Coupe Roadsters, and it remains a very important design in Packard history. Its significance hasn’t gone unnoticed, having been enjoyed by well-known connoisseurs of the marque. It presents today in handsome condition, an ideal choice for CCCA CARavan Touring or casual show.  

    For sale
    $249,500(£0)
  • 1937 Cadillac Series 60 Convertible

    For sale
    $129,500(£0)

    The late 1930s were a time of major transition for America’s luxury auto makers. Those companies that survived the Great Depression now faced a drastically different market with fewer buyers opting for expensive coachbuilt bodies, and instead buying readily-built factory-supplied cars straight off the show floor. Both Cadillac and its chief rival Packard had seen the importance of junior ranges to offer their respective marque’s luxury and style at a more affordable price, with LaSalle introduced by GM in the late 1920s to fill the void between top range Buicks and entry level Cadillacs. But by the late 1930s, that price gap between LaSalle and the lowest price Series 70 had grown again, so a new model was introduced to serve as price-leader for Cadillac. The Series 60 debuted in 1936, and while it was a value leader, it was still a true Cadillac. Harley Earl penned a new body with a distinct tall and narrow grille, v-shaped windscreen and round, flowing fenders. Motivation came courtesy of Cadillac’s new and less expensive “monoblock” V8 engine displacing 322 cubic inches and producing 125 horsepower – which increased to 135 with when the engine was upgraded to 346 cubes the following year. The chassis featured GM’s Knee-Action independent front suspension as well as dual servo brakes. Built from 1936-1938, the original Series 60 was a fine driving motorcar, available in a variety of body styles and configurations. While it was designed as lower priced model for the prestigious marque, there was no doubt it was still very much a proper Cadillac, and with approximately 7,000 built (vs 31,000 Series 50 LaSalles) it remains relatively rare today. This handsome 1937 Cadillac Series 60 wears an uncommon and elegant convertible coupe body by Fisher. 1937 models were refreshed by Harley Earl to wear a distinct die cast egg crate grille and complementary bright hood side vents with V8 logos. It is a fine looking automobile, and the presentation very good in Richelieu Maroon with a tan top, and bright red wheels adorned with wide whitewall tires. A good quality restoration is reflected in excellent panel fit, attractive and glossy paintwork, and proper detailing. This particular car was once part of famed California broadcaster Art Astor’s extensive collection of cars and automobilia. The Fisher convertible coupe body is very stylish and nicely detailed with rare amber Cadillac fog lamps, a beautiful Goddess mascot, as well as an unusual rear treatment that features both a rumble seat and an integrated trunk. Lacking sidemount spares, the look is clean, sleek and uncluttered, beautifully proportioned on the 124” wheelbase chassis. The interior is trimmed in maroon leather on the seats and door cards, with a contrasting tan steel dash and tan carpets. Seats are in quite good condition, with just a few minor creases in the leather from light use, but otherwise remaining supple and attractive. The leather door and kick panels, as well as the carpets are also very good, showing little in the way of wear. Original instruments grace the painted steel dash and the original switchgear all appears in good order. The tan canvas top is presented in similarly fine condition, featuring a unique split glass rear window. Like the exterior, the cabin shows a quality restoration that has aged very well and seen only light use. Cadillac’s Monoblock 346 cubic inch V8 engine is one of the greats of the era. It is relatively light, powerful and very flexible, making these Cadillacs some of the best driving machines of the late-pre-war period. Our example is no exception, with a good running V8 that presents very well in the engine bay. Some of the original-type porcelain coatings have been baked-off the manifolds, which is certainly not uncommon for a car that has seen use on the road. Despite this, the engine bay remains very attractive displaying mostly correct colors, finishes and details. Overall, this car’s good quality restoration, while older, still presents well, making it a fine candidate for AACA or similar shows. Perhaps more so, this rare and attractive Cadillac Series 60 Convertible Coupe would be a wonderful machine to enjoy on tours and rallies, thanks to the powerful V8, fully synchronized transmission, and excellent handling from the independent front suspension. It is a stylish and attractive example of this immanently usable and very enjoyable pre-war Cadillac.  

    For sale
    $129,500(£0)
  • 1951 Talbot T26 Record Coupe

    For sale
    $198,500(£0)

    Automobiles Talbot was once part of a conglomerate of both French and English companies that included Sunbeam, Talbot and Darracq. Builders of mid and upper market luxury cars to compete with the likes of Salmson, Delahaye and Delage, the company was rife with chaos in the upper management and built a number of cars that competed for the same buyers. Rather confusingly, both British and French versions of Talbot cars were offered, not necessarily related to one another. Given the confusion in which S.T. D. Motors, LTD was run, it was not terribly surprising when the firm collapsed in 1935. In the fallout, the brands were split apart with Sunbeam and British Talbot going to the English Rootes Group, and the French side of Talbot (formerly Darracq) fell into the hands of Italian-born Anthony Lago, who had been acting as General Manager for the firm for the past year. Lago was a gifted engineer and a visionary leader, and in his new position as head of his own automobile company, he set about designing a new, high-performance engine for the current models still in production. The existing bottom-end was reworked and an all-new cylinder head was fitted with overhead valves, hemispherical combustion chambers and centrally mounted spark plugs, not unlike that of a BMW 328. The new model was dubbed Grand Sport in 110 horsepower form, or “Baby Sport” for the 80 horsepower version. All models now had independent front suspension and Wilson Pre-Select gearboxes were fitted to the highest spec models. The new engine and chassis revisions were responsible for the survival of Talbot, with chassis-only “Lago SS” models supplied to many of the great Parisian coachbuilders, with the likes of Figoni et Falaschi building some of their most iconic designs atop Talbo-Lago chassis. After WWII, Tony Lago again revised his six-cylinder engine, increasing capacity to 4.5 liters for the T-26 and adding a re-designed head with twin camshafts and a new seven main bearing block. This powerful and robust engine proved itself a worthy competitor in motorsport, winning the grueling 24H LeMans in 1950. In road trim, the engine was smooth and reliable, making Talbot-Lagos the preferred choice for European elite to enjoy cross-continental grand tours. This example, a 1950 T-26 Record Coupe, wears beautiful coachwork by Henri Chapron, one of the truly great Parisian designers and coachbuilders. This particular car is one of three similar designs produced for the Chapron stand at the 1950 Paris Auto Salon. The design was highly regarded by the jury, and awarded a prize for its progressive, modern elegance. From the show stand, it was sold new to a Mr. Migliaccio of Italy. It resurfaced in the early 1970s in the hands of none other than Formula 1 World Champion and noted motoring enthusiast Phil Hill, who had it repainted in its original black livery. In 1983 it was sold to Duke Davenport of Tucson, Arizona who thoroughly enjoyed driving and showing the car. In his ownership, it was awarded an AACA National First Place in San Diego, California – an event Mr. Davenport proudly drove to and from in this gorgeous Talbot-Lago. Following Mr. Davenport’s passing, the Talbot-Lago went to Omaha, Nebraska-based Don Sears in the late 1990s, then on to two subsequent owners, the latter of which treated the car to a sympathetic cosmetic restoration which included all new paintwork and interior trim. Following the restoration, the car was shown at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance where it earned a class prize. Today, the Talbot-Lago presents in lovely condition, the restoration having mellowed nicely and the car taking on a rich and inviting charm. The high quality Chapron coachwork is nicely detailed with its split and louvered bonnet, sliding sunroof, and driving lamps atop the beautifully sculpted bumpers. The flowing and streamlined design is interspersed with restrained flashes of chrome and geometric vents in the wings. It rides on gorgeous 18” Rudge chrome wire wheels, with the brake drums painted medium red to accent the lighter of the two body tones. It is a beautiful design and presented in fine order with a good older restoration, high quality finishes and excellent bright work. The two-tone red theme continues inside with the red seats and door cards featuring exotic ostrich inserts. Burgundy wool carpets are bound in red leather, and the interior fittings and hardware are very well-presented. The wood door caps are beautiful, and the dash is done in painted wood-grain to match. Correct French Jaeger instruments and a Bayard clock are in good order, as is the switchgear and original four-spoke steering wheel. The boot has been trimmed in carpet to match, and is likewise in excellent condition. Beneath the two-piece louvered bonnet lays the 4.5-liter Tony Lago-designed inline six, which breathes through twin Zenith carburetors. The engine, #26538, produces a very healthy 170 horsepower, driving the rear wheels via a Wilson Pre-Select transmission, as equipped from new. It is very well presented in clean and tidy order, appearing very original and largely correct. Thankfully the restorers were careful to preserve the car’s original feel, as it has only received restoration work as-needed over the years, having never been fully torn down. That original quality, in combination with powerful inline six and light, nimble race-derived chassis make this Talbot-Lago T-26 is an absolute pleasure to drive. The rare and elegant Henri Chapron Coachwork impart impeccable style to form what is the ideal formula for a classic Talbot-Lago: Stunning looks and breathtaking performance in one beautifully crafted package. This fine automobile would make an excellent touring companion, is worthy for mid-level shows and concours and it has the performance and comfort to make an outstanding choice for rallies.

    For sale
    $198,500(£0)
  • 1932 Packard 904 Dietrich Sport Phaeton

    For sale
    $1,450,000(£0)

    In 1932, while facing America’s worsening economic depression, luxury car builders seemingly put their heads down and produce ever more luxurious machines at the top of their ranges. But companies like Packard knew they needed large reserves of cash if they were to survive the next few years. One of the strategies employed by Packard to deal with the Great Depression was to consolidate as much of its body construction and trimmings as possible in its own facilities, filling the space that was becoming under-used as production dropped. Factory bodies became ever more popular with buyers, but custom coachbuilding was still far from dead, and Packard was particularly keen on maintaining a strong relationship with Murray Corporation’s affiliate, Dietrich Inc. Raymond Dietrich’s reputation was beyond reproach among stylists of the late 1920s and early 1930s, and his designs provided welcome new ideas and concepts for Packard’s own coachwork. With the 9th series, Dietrich performed some of his best work; beautiful, elegant machines that made the best of Packard’s fabulous new chassis that was larger, more powerful and faster than any standard model that preceded it. In particular, the “Individual Custom by Dietrich” bodies, which were custom tailored for the flagship senior Packard Chassis (9th, 10th and 11th series) truly reflected the masterful talent of Dietrich. Though they could be purchased directly from a Packard dealer, they were hugely expensive, representing the most costly models available aside from true one-off custom coachwork. Each body was custom-tailored to the buyer’s wishes and in many ways they were the last truly custom Dietrich bodies, as later production cars wearing the Dietrich name simply borrowed styling cues from earlier Individual Customs.  Even after Dietrich’s ouster from the firm that bore his name, his influence was felt on Packard’s design catalog for many years to come, and Dietrich-bodied Packards continue to draw attention from collectors and enthusiasts for their impeccable, breathtaking style. Our gorgeous featured Packard is a 1932 Eight Deluxe 904 wearing rare and desirable Individual Custom Sport Phaeton coachwork by Dietrich. This fabulous car was sold new on August 18th 1932 by Douglas M. Longyear, Inc., also known as Hollywood Motors, a Packard dealer located just down the road from the Grauman's Chinese Theater. It has been fully restored to concours standards in its fabulous original color scheme of Moss Agate Grey on the body and chassis, with Aztec Olivine Brown feature lines and off-white coach stripes. Fine details include body colored louvers in the radiator grille, and body colored wheel rims contrasting chrome hubs and spokes. The car rides on a set of brand new blackwall tires for an effect that is understated yet quite striking, perfectly suited to Ray Dietrich’s fabulous and sporty styling. As these cars were built to suit for the buyer, it is clear the original owner had quite fine taste. The presentation is fabulous, the car having been treated to a recent full restoration to very high standards of quality. Paintwork, body fitment and detailing are exquisite as one would expect from a concours quality restoration. Chrome plating is beautiful and the body is adorned with a Goddess of Speed mascot, dual sidemount spare wheels with body colored covers, chrome counterweighted bumpers, and an original luggage rack in the rear. The Sport Phaeton body style gives the car a long, low slung and sporting appearance, with its laid-back split windscreen and gracefully sweeping fenders. Rear passengers are kept comfortable thanks to a separate central windscreen with unique, half-moon wind-wings that fold outward. For the full open-air effect, the rear screen can be fully retracted into the back of the front seat. The lush and luxurious cabin is trimmed in light mocha-colored leather front and rear. The seats and carpets appear absolutely fresh with no apparent wear and extremely high quality presentation. Beautiful door panels are covered in matching leather and properly detailed, capped with gorgeous wood trim. The dash houses a beautiful array of factory instruments and controls, all finished to a high standard. As one should expect from such an impeccably prepared Senior Packard of this era, the car is mechanically robust and has been enjoyed for many thousands of miles on tours and events through the years. It remains in fabulous order, with a properly detailed inline-eight cylinder engine and a clean and tidy chassis. The most recent owners have treated the car to a thorough freshening, and it has appeared at events such as the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance and Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. This fabulous Individual Custom Dietrich is presented in attractive colors, is a joy to drive and is virtually concours ready. This is a marvelous opportunity to acquire one of the most stylish and desirable Packards of the Classic Era, fresh from long-term stewardship in a large and important collection.  

    For sale
    $1,450,000(£0)
  • 1955 Cadillac Die Valkyrie Concept Car

    For sale
    $395,000(£0)

    Brooks Stevens is one of America’s great industrial design masters. Practicing design much in the same way his contemporaries like Raymond Loewy and John Vassos, Stevens designed products, machines and logos in virtually any industry, amassing a huge and diverse portfolio that covered architecture, industrial design and graphic design. Some of his most notable projects include the Miller Beer logo, the Evinrude Lark outboard motor, and the world-famous Oscar Meyer Weinermobile. His iconic design for the 1949 Harley-Davidson Hydra Glide is still in use on today’s Heritage range. Of course, the automobile industry played a huge role in Stevens’ illustrious career. He is perhaps best known for his work with Studebaker, redesigning the Grand Turismo Hawk on a miniscule budget, and also the Jeep Wagoneer, a design that remained virtually unchanged from 1963 through the model’s discontinuation in 1991. He also designed the original Excalibur sports car in conjunction with Kaiser, and the subsequent “neo-classic” models that came after. But one of his earliest contributions to the motoring industry came in 1955, with a car that he hoped would introduce American V8 power, as well as the Brooks Stevens name, to the European marketplace. Brooks Stevens had a strong desire to be recognized in the European car design world. He was given the idea to design a luxury car worthy of the European show circuit; an automobile that would show the world what Brooks Stevens could do. With backing from a Cleveland-based real estate developer, Stevens began with a new 1955 Cadillac Series 60 Special chassis, and designed a flamboyant new body from the ground up. Die Valkyrie debuted at the Paris Auto Salon, with its huge, dramatic V-shaped grille and front bumper treatment that flowed out, bisecting the headlamps and traveling down the body sides in one line. A beautiful upward sweep ahead of the rear wheel arch was highlighted by a two-tone black and white color scheme, and the coupe roof was fully removable to make a four-seat convertible. Coachwork and construction was handled by Hermann Spohn of Ravensburg Germany. Spohn was a primary supplier of Maybach bodies prior to WWII, and his work also graced Hispano-Suiza, Mercedes-Benz and other chassis, so there was little question about quality. Die Valkyrie was a big car, sharing the same 133-inch wheelbase as the Cadillac donor. But it also shared Cadillac’s OHV, 331 cubic inch dual-quad engine that made a solid 270 horsepower so performance was not lacking. Rumors even circulated that Cadillac considered backing the project as a way to break into the fickle European market, and Stevens made no attempt to hide the source of his donor vehicle. But ultimately, the project never went beyond two cars, the first which was purchased by Stevens himself as a gift for his wife who enjoyed the car for many thousands of miles before it went into the Brooks Stevens Museum where it remained through the mid-1990s. We are very pleased to offer this Die Valkyrie, the very example that belonged to Brooks and Alice Stevens. Aside from one repaint it remains in fabulously original condition and still shows the miles that Alice put on the car during her time enjoying it. The fabulous, over-the-top styling of Die Valkyrie is of course the first thing that grabs your attention. But as you look closer, you see it is a fully functional luxury automobile, not merely a styling exercise. Spohn’s craftsmanship is outstanding, as the car is beautifully constructed and detailed. It is still presented in its original color scheme of white and black with virtually every original detail still in place. Given its largely unrestored and original condition, there are a few minor blemishes that appear in the paintwork and elsewhere, though they hardly detract from the drama and glamour of Brooks Stevens’ fabulous design. The extensive original chrome trim is intact and in very fine condition, showing little wear and no damage, further backing the incredibly low original mileage. It rides on its original wheels which are adorned with original Cadillac hubcaps and shod with a set of very unusual US Royal Master tires which mimic the turbine styling of the hubcaps in their sidewalls. The car is incredibly dramatic; long, low and wide with that signature “cow catcher” grille up front. The interior is trimmed in black leather which has been beautifully preserved in completely original and unrestored condition. It is believed the large, plush chairs may share components with a Mercedes 300 which is entirely feasible given its construction at Spohn in Germany. Carpets are in fine condition and the door panels are beautifully styled with sunburst pattern leather, accented with a white flash and topped with a polished speed-form trim. The dash is essentially standard issue Cadillac, which typically high quality controls and switchgear. Mechanically, Die Valkyrie remains in a highly original and unrestored state. The Cadillac 331 is topped with original dual-quad intake and original “bat wing” air cleaner. The engine bay is tidy and has been carefully detailed, to ensure its high levels of originality have not been erased. It features power steering and brakes as original and the remainder of the chassis and drivetrain are all factory Cadillac components, allowing for straightforward servicing. This is an incredible opportunity to acquire an automobile that Brooks Stevens designed to highlight his immense talents. It has remarkable history as the Paris show car, as the very car that his wife Alice enjoyed driving, and the car that was retained by the Stevens museum for decades. It has survived in remarkably original condition thanks to the efforts of the previous caretaker, the only other owner outside the Stevens family. A fabulous and dramatic piece of mid-century design history and presented in magnificently well-preserved condition, Die Valkyrie is sure to be welcome at virtually concours event worldwide, and would make a most welcome centerpiece to any collection of rare and exciting concept cars.

    For sale
    $395,000(£0)
  • 1930 Packard 734 Speedster

    For sale
    $1,800,000(£0)

    In 1930, Packard took a big leap outside of its traditional comfort zone of luxury and prestige with the introduction of the overtly sporty, driver-focused 734 Speedster. The 734 (7th series, 134” wheelbase) was based on a new, shortened and boxed version of the Standard Eight chassis, which was designed exclusively for this model. Built in Packard’s newly established in-house custom shop, each 734 received a hotter variant of the proven 385 cubic inch straight-eight engine. The engine was upgraded with a newly designed separate intake manifold, oversize updraught Detroit Lubricator carburetor, and a 45-degree mounted, finned exhaust manifold. A larger vacuum booster was added and the engine was mated to a model-specific four-speed gearbox. These additions could push the new 734 to 100mph, so it also featured upgraded brakes with large, finned drums. Contrary to popular belief, the “Speedster” name referred not to the body style, but to the sporting nature of the chassis. The 734 Speedster was actually available in five different custom-catalog body styles: A two-seat boat-tail runabout, four-seat runabout roadster with rumble seat, sport phaeton, Victoria coupe, or sedan. In spite of the exceptional performance and quality, Packard only sold approximately 113 examples of the 734. The marketing team was unsure of what to do with such a high-performance machine, given the majority of Packard clients preferred luxury and silent operation over outright speed. Today, the 734 is one of the most coveted of all Packards, with only a handful of genuine examples surviving, it is considered by many to be the Holy Grail motorcar of the America Classic Era. We are very pleased to offer this magnificent 1930 Packard 734 Speedster Runabout, a fully researched and vetted example with outstanding history and a recent, concours-level restoration. Chassis number 184088, this fabulous machine was delivered new to a Mrs. Sealey from Portland, Oregon. The firewall data plate confirms this information with a stated delivery date of 7-7-30 by Service & Sales, Inc. Portland, Oregon. It isn’t known how long Mrs. Sealey retained her Packard, but it was acquired by William F. Harrah in 1960, and it became part of his famous, world-class collection of motor cars. Mr. Harrah retained this Packard for twenty-six years, this automobile a clear standout in a collection that spanned as many as 1,800 cars. Following its time with Harrah, the car went directly to another important collection, that of General William Lyon. General Lyon was a noted connoisseur of important Packards, and this car was one of the true flagships of his collection. While in his care, the Speedster was kept in exceptional mechanical order by his team of full time mechanics, and it is said that General Lyons enjoyed driving it immensely, calling it “a car for the true enthusiast”. The Speedster left the Lyons Collection in 2011 and while in the hands of its next and most recent owner was treated to a careful, yet comprehensive restoration to the stunning livery you see it today. Since General Lyons’ ownership, it has been carefully inspected by Packard 734 experts and found to be highly correct, still equipped with the original body (No. 442-26), chassis (No. 184088), engine (No. 184095), and other major components. The beautiful maroon coachwork is accented with black feature lines, fenders and chassis. The presentation is exceptional as one would expect from a concours-ready example, with impeccable panel fit, paint finishes, and show-quality chrome plating. Six exquisite new chrome wire wheels were specially built for this car and fitted with blackwall tires to provide the signature sporting character. The top is trimmed in black Haartz canvas, atop a fully restored frame. Side curtains are also included, as is a clear plastic dust cover for the top. Gorgeous, virtually new black leather seats are in beautiful order; staggered in the cockpit to allow the driver room for more spirited driving. Bright red carpets are bound in black enhance the sporty nature of the cabin as well. All detailing and finish work is executed to the highest of standards, worthy of show on the world’s concours circuit. Mechanically, this Packard is fully sorted and well-prepared, with performance to match its exceptional cosmetic quality. It would be equally at home on a tour as it would on the show circuit and is a delight to drive. Comprehensive inspections confirm that it retains the original engine, steering box, frame, and rear axle as well as the correct finned manifolds. The gearbox, a known weak point on these 1930 models, has been replaced with a visually identical four-speed unit from 1931 as it has inherently stronger internals than the earlier units. In fact, of the 19 known 1930 734 Speedsters, only 7 retain their original gearboxes, and this modification is widely accepted in the Packard community, particularly for any car that will be driven and enjoyed as intended. The only other non-original component found was the front axle, though it retains the correct Speedster finned drum brakes. Detailing on the chassis and engine is virtually faultless, as one would expect from a show-ready and lightly driven example. Having had just three owners in 57 years, this is an incredibly rare opportunity to acquire one of just a handful of genuine, verified 734 Speedster Runabouts in existence. It is a stunning motorcar with remarkable history in the hands of world-famous collectors and a restoration that is beyond reproach. Widely considered to be the ultimate Packard, the 734 Speedster Runabout seamlessly combines high style, exquisite quality, and 100mph performance in a timeless, stunningly beautiful package.

    For sale
    $1,800,000(£0)
  • 1929 Cadillac 341B Roadster

    For sale
    $159,500(£0)

    At the height of the Classic Era in the late 1920s, Cadillac had been long established as one of America’s most technically creative automobile manufacturers. Since its inception in 1902 (from the remains of The Henry Ford Company, and guided by Henry M. Leland) Cadillac has led the way with American innovation. The electric self-starter, safety glass, electric lamps, the all-steel roof (where previous cars had fabric roof sections), the synchromesh transmission, the dual-plane crankshaft V8 and even the V16 engine were all Cadillac firsts. Cadillac jockeyed for for top honors in the American market (as well as a handful of fickle overseas buyers) with the likes of Packard, Pierce-Arrow and others, buoyed by customers who remained loyal for their exceptional build quality, elegant style and robust performance. 1929 saw Cadillac get a light facelift over the 1928 models, with a few tweaks made to the front end sheetmetal by a new hire to GM’s Art & Color department named Harley Earl; a man who would go on to be one of the most influential stylists in history and put GM at the top of the game in the world of design. Styling aside, the most significant changes for ’29 lay beneath the bodywork. The 341 cubic inch, 95 horsepower V8 was mated to an all-new “clashless” synchromesh gearbox, freeing drivers from the need to double clutch when changing gears and elevating Cadillac to the top of the luxury car market with this new-found ease of operation. The new gearbox allowed the car to be driven smoothly and deliver quiet, effortless performance. 1929 also saw the introduction of safety glass, yet another industry first. Braking and road holding were also excellent thanks to the powerful four-wheel mechanical brakes and Delco dual-action shock absorbers which were fitted for the first time. As typical for the era, a wide variety of standard catalog bodies by Fisher and Fleetwood were available, though customers could elect to have a chassis delivered to a coachbuilder of choice, with such famous design houses as Kellner, Murphy and Hibbard & Darrin having put their mark on Cadillac chassis, as well as a handful of somewhat less famous coachbuilders the world over. This striking 1929 Cadillac 341B wears unusual, one-off “Safari Roadster” coachwork supplied by Henry Kruse of Chelsea, London. Little is known about this particular coachbuilder or the earliest origins of this Cadillac, but it has been suggested this car was used as a game hunting car in India; the main clues being the fascinating cut-down, double-opening doors that may have been used for a hunter to lean out and sight a rifle. The very sporty and evocative body style also features a windscreen that both hinges open and folds flat, and a unique rounded tail with a large boot, in place of a traditional rumble seat. It is finished in a handsome combination of silver on the main body with black fenders, black top surfaces, and eye-catching red accents on the chassis, inside of the wings, and red coach stripes to tie it all together. It is comprehensively accessorized with dual sidemount spares topped with mirrors, dual Trippe-Light driving lamps on lovely chrome brackets, a radiator stone guard, a trunk rack, and the classic “Herald” radiator mascot. The wheels feature subtle silver painted hubs with polished spokes and trim rings and are wrapped in sporty black-wall Firestone tires. Overall quality is very good, with an older but high-standard restoration still showing in attractive order. The paint quality is quite good with consistent body and panel fitment, good quality chrome plating and detailing. The two-place cockpit is trimmed in rich red leather to complement the chassis and body accents, and is presented in very good condition, showing only slight age and signs of use since restoration. The unique split doors open fully for easier ingress, or the smaller doors can be opened independently, presumably for a hunter in India to be able to lean out with his rifle without falling completely out of the car. A full folding top is trimmed in black canvas and piped in red, with matching side curtains included. Original instruments adorn the sporty and simple black lacquered dash panel. The 341 cubic-inch V8 engine presents in very good condition, benefitting from a recent cosmetic freshening. Porcelain black heads and cylinders sit atop a cast-finish crankcase as original. The detailing is very good quality and appropriate for a car that would be best enjoyed on the road, though not out of place in a mid-level show. Previous owners have fully enjoyed this car, as it has participated in 5 Glidden Tours and is known among Cadillac LaSalle club stalwarts. It benefits from recent sorting by Brian Joseph of Classic & Exotic Service in Michigan and remains in outstanding mechanical order, ready for use and a joy to drive. This very special and unusual Cadillac is a beautiful machine with an intriguing past, and an excellent choice for CCCA CARavan Touring, Cadillac LaSalle Club and AACA events. Rare and exciting coachwork, an evocative color scheme and a well-preserved, quality restoration make this example a true standout among Full Classic Cadillacs.

    For sale
    $159,500(£0)