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Hyman Ltd Cars for sale

104 Search results
  • 1982 Toyota FJ40 Land Cruiser

    $72,500(£53,722.50)

    Like the Jeep and the Land Rover before it, the Toyota Land Cruiser is a vehicle whose reputation was hard earned in battle, mud, and desert sand. This Japanese take on the all-purpose off-roader can thank the original Jeep for its existence, which is little surprise when comparing the two trucks side-by-side.  In 1950, the US Government commissioned Toyota to build 100 Willys Jeeps that were to be used in the Korean War. Toyota obliged but immediately saw room for improvement on the old American design. In 1951 Toyota developed their own prototype drawing on the best the Jeep and the Land Rover had to offer. Production of the “Toyota Jeep BJ” began in 1953 and the vehicle was put into service primarily for police and military. In 1954, the civilian version gained the Land Cruiser name and grew in popularity as an all-round utility vehicle for farmers or anyone needing to get over rough terrain. In 1960, the 40-series Land Cruiser was unveiled with all-new body styling, an improved chassis and new engine options. It remained in regular production for 24 years, becoming a legend for its amazing ruggedness as much as its tough-guy good looks. It served at the hands of soldiers and warlords alike on virtually every continent on the globe. Hundreds of thousands of Land Cruiser FJ40s are still in service in all corners of the earth, no matter how remote they may be. 40-Series Land Cruisers were offered in a variety of body styles ranging from the most popular short-wheelbase convertible, to long wheelbase troop carriers and pickups. Our featured 1982 FJ40 is a factory two-door hardtop with a desirable “barn door” rear end (one piece upper liftgate split lower doors). Starting with what was a highly original, solid and unmodified example, it has been sympathetically refreshed using factory Toyota parts and new paint by FJ experts and presents in beautiful condition with impeccable detailing throughout. Recently restored in the factory original shade of dark red with a white roof, this FJ40 retains a high degree of originality. The bodywork has not been over-restored; instead it shows the spot weld dimples and joints in the panels as it would have when new. The paint quality is very good, and the exterior detailing is all impeccably presented, with correct hardware, fittings and details. The FJ40 is famously utilitarian, so there is little in the way of chrome, but the hood latches, windscreen hold-downs, badges and other fittings are all in factory correct silver cad finishes. Even the hardware in the wheel arches and on the chassis is in correct gold-cadmium plating. It rides on a set of original gray-painted steel wheels, adorned with new O.E. dog-dish hubcaps wrapped in a set of 5 meaty Pirelli Scorpion tires for just the right aggressive, iconic off-road look. The interior displays a wonderfully utilitarian charm, yet is impeccably detailed to factory correct standards. The front and side-facing rear seats are trimmed in charcoal vinyl as original; and new seatbelts have been fitted. The floors are body color bare steel as original and the dash wears all of the original switches, knobs and placards – only a badge from the restorer deviates from stock. A factory A/C system is fitted below the dash, which has recently been refurbished with a new compressor. Toyota’s legendary 2F inline-six cylinder engine presents extremely well, with incredible detailing.  Cad-plated fittings and hardware highlight the correctly finished engine, air cleaner and ancillaries. It is equipped with factory air con and power steering systems. The engine runs well, sending power through the four-speed transmission and transfer case. The chassis is also beautifully detailed, featuring a new OEM exhaust system and rebuilt brakes all around. The Toyota Land Cruiser FJ40 has become a highly collectible classic, and is increasingly in high demand with enthusiasts. As with any classic off-roader, the go-anywhere nature and ability to take serious abuse means that solid, unmodified, and pristine examples can be quite difficult to come by. There are fewer better than this Land Cruiser FJ40, a beautifully prepared and presented example that is ready to be thoroughly enjoyed.  

    Last update: 1 Day Old
    For sale
    Hyman Ltd
    314-524-6000 VIEW CONTACT NUMBER
  • 1960 Jaguar XK 150 S Fixed Head Coupe

    $139,500(£103,369.50)

    Jaguar unveiled the XK150 in 1957 as a heavily reworked and updated replacement for the XK140. By that time, the XK chassis was starting to show its age in the face of competition, but Jaguar was at least listening to their customer feedback and made a number of improvements to the handling, comfort and refinement of the XK. Most notably, the svelte and curvaceous body was redesigned with more slab sides, a wider, longer hood and a larger cockpit. The split windscreen gave way to a new one-piece curved ‘screen and all models, including the roadster offered proper roll-up windows. Of the three evolutions of the XK-series, the XK150 is far and away the roomies and most comfortable thanks to those thinner doors and longer cockpit. Initially, the 150 was a bit slower than the 140 thanks to the additional bulk from the new body. As with previous XK models, the 150 was available in three body styles: An Open Two Seat roadster, more luxurious open Drop Head Coupe (with a larger, lined roof) and the hardtop Fixed Head Coupe, which offered a pair of vestigial rear seats; an arrangement best suited for overnight bags rather than passengers. In spite of the early criticisms, the XK150 was still a formidable performance car, and Jaguar quickly rectified the initial speed deficit with the addition of the 210 horsepower 3.4 liter Special Equipment option. Four wheel disc brakes which had been proven in competition on the C-Type and D-Type racers were also fitted and the XK140’s rack-and-pinion steering was tuned for even better feel. For buyers who wanted even more power than the SE had to offer, the ultimate “S” package included a trio of 2” bore S.U. HD8 carburetors and a straight-port cylinder head derived from the C-Type. Output was a full 250 horsepower, a number that proved highly effective at silencing the critics. The Motor tested one such 3.4-liter XK150S wearing fixed-head coupe bodywork, going on to declare it the fastest closed car they had ever subjected to a full road test. The engineers and designers at Brown’s Lane continued to refine the XK breed through 1960 when focus was then shifted to the XK’s ground-breaking successor, the E-Type. The seductive lines of the XK120 and stonking performance of the ground-breaking E-Type can sometimes overshadow the XK150, but many enthusiasts know it to be one of the finest driving and best built of the breed. This excellent 1960 XK150 S Fixed Head Coupe is a wonderful example of the final iteration of the legendary XK-series. This is a genuine, S-specification car with a numbers-matching drivetrain that was the subject of a comprehensive, highly-detailed, nut-and-bolt restoration approximately 10 years ago. It remains in beautiful condition today, having aged nicely with light use and regular maintenance. It is finished in the classic combination British Racing Green over tan leather. Green painted wire wheels shod with blackwall radial tires give a distinctive and decidedly sporting appearance. A former 99 point JCNA show car, paint quality is excellent and the panels are exceptionally straight with excellent fit and gaps. Like the paintwork, the chrome exterior trim remains in very good order since the restoration was completed. Correct original badges proudly proclaim Jaguar’s success at LeMans. The interior is trimmed in correct materials and in factory correct colors, and it presents in attractive condition, remaining inviting and warm, showing just a the slightest bit of mellowing since the restoration. Tan Wilton carpets are in excellent order, properly fitted to original specification. For the XK150 coupe, Jaguar took a more sporting approach and eschewed the heavy walnut trim for the dash and door caps in favor of a simple leather trimmed fascia and door cards. Excellent restored Smiths instruments adorn the central panel and the original, factory correct switchgear all remain in excellent order. The 3.4 liter version of the legendary XK twin-cam inline-six cylinder is a particularly sweet unit when matched with the trio of 2-inch S.U. carburetors and the high-flow head that makes up the “S” specification. Revvy and eager, it emits a glorious noise through the twin-exhausts. As with the rest of the car, the engine presents very well with proper fittings and hardware. The signature polished alloy cam covers and intake manifold are in beautiful order, and the cylinder head, ancillaries and underhood panels are all finished to correct factory standards. The engine is mated to a four-speed manual gearbox with optional electric overdrive, as original. Thanks to that four-speed overdrive unit, 250 horsepower output, and a roomy, comfortable cabin, this XK150 S is a staggeringly good grand touring car. When this particular example was restored, it was done so with a careful eye toward JCNA judging sheets, and it proved its mettle with a 99-point score. Since its days as a hardcore show car, it has since been thoroughly enjoyed yet exceptionally well maintained. It remains a beautiful looker and completely showable, yet is ideally suited for enjoyment on the road. The XK150 S is the ultimate evolution of the XK-series and with its classic lines, refined quality and outstanding performance; is the preferred choice among driving enthusiasts.

    Last update: 1 Day Old
    For sale
  • 1939 Packard Twelve Coupe

    $159,500(£118,189.50)

    Packard’s legendary twelve-cylinder cars are among of the most desirable and respected of all pre-war American classics. From 1916-1923, the “Twin Six” established Packard’s leadership in the luxury automobile market, and after a hiatus for the model, a new twelve-cylinder Packard returned in 1932 to take on Cadillac’s headline-grabbing V-16, Lincoln’s V-12, and other manufacturers joining the multi-cylinder race. 1939 marked 40 years of Packard production, yet sadly it also marked the final year for Packard V-12 production. In the aftermath of the Great Depression, buyers began to drift away from the large, extravagant custom bodies that dominated the segment for so many years. So when faced with slumping sales and rising costs, the expensive V-12 was dropped with only 446 examples leaving the famous Detroit plant in the final year. As before, the 67-degree V-12 displaced 473 cubic inches and produced a very healthy 175 horsepower, far superior to Lincoln’s output and just ten shy of Cadillac’s mighty V-16. It is often said that the power and sublime smoothness of the Packard V-12 is what inspired Enzo Ferrari to use the same configuration in his cars… an anecdote that may never be proven but is certainly believable once you experience the silken nature of the great Packard engine. For 1939, no fewer than fourteen body styles were offered in the factory catalog, and the chassis offered in two wheelbase lengths, the 1707 (134 inches) and the 1708 (139 inches). Vacuum assisted brakes and even a vacuum assisted clutch made for easy, light operation. So while the Packard Twelve is a big, grand car, it is surprisingly pleasant and hugely enjoyable to drive. This 1939 Packard 1707 Twelve wears handsome and desirable 2/4-Passenger Coupe coachwork from the factory catalog (style number 1238) coming to us most recently from the hands of a long-term owner who has cared for it over the past forty years. The previous owner recalls finding the car through a classified ad in the San Francisco Chronicle in the 1970s, and upon seeing it for the first time, he was surprised to find it remarkably correct, unrestored and unmolested. It had apparently been kept in the seller’s family for many years prior and had clearly been cherished. A deal was done on the spot and the new owner went on enjoy his lovely Packard Twelve for the next four decades. Within the last ten years, a sympathetic, quality restoration was performed by AutoEuropa of California. Finished in Packard Maroon, this lovely coupe still presents today in very good order, with straight, properly aligned panels and high-quality paintwork. The body is beautifully stylish, with full, curvaceous fenders, a swept-back radiator grille and a streamlined profile. No range-topping model would be complete without the right accessories, and this car delivers with its grand Cormorant mascot, dual Trippe Light spot lamps, body-colored steel sidemount covers, and a matching body-colored Packard trunk in the rear. It is also equipped with a rumble seat for two occasional rear passengers as well as a golf-bag door. Exterior brightwork is in very good condition overall. Inside the two-passenger cabin, one finds excellent upholstery in a period appropriate striped-pattern broadcloth. Beautiful wood trim adorns the door caps, and the dash is wood-grained paint on steel as original, with a lineup of clear and well-presented original instruments. Chrome plating on the interior fittings is good, with some appearing in very good original condition. Seats, door panels and other soft trim, such as the gray wool headlining, remain in excellent order, showing the car was used lightly and carefully since its restoration. The same goes with the maroon leather trim on the rumble seat. The engine bay and undercarriage are clean, tidy and very well-presented. While some years have passed since it was restored, this Packard has been lovingly cared for and maintained in fine order. Packard’s final series twelve-cylinder presents in clean and well-detailed condition with correct Packard-green engine paint and black accessories. As a 1939 model, it retains the correct original column-shifted manual transmission, which now sends its power through an updated “high-speed” rear axle, which was a factory option. This very rare, handsome and desirable Packard Coupe has clearly been cherished throughout its life. The attractive, high-quality restoration has only mellowed slightly since completion, and the car has been used for the occasional tour, yet seldom shown. It remains a very fine choice for AACA or CCCA shows, yet is also a wonderful automobile for an enthusiast to enjoy the splendor of a Twelve-Cylinder Packard on CCCA CARavan tours or similar events.

    Last update: 4 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1971 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spyder

    $650,000(£481,650)

    Italy in the late 1960s was a hotbed of creative energy in the automobile industry. The supercar race was heating up in a major way as Ferrari, Lamborghini, Maserati and even DeTomaso were locked in a battle for exotic car supremacy. Ferrari was staunchly traditional, Enzo once quipping that a mid-engine car was akin to putting the cart before the horse. Their front-mounted V12 layout had proven successful for many years, and was the foundation of the traditional Ferrari road car, even in the face of the mid-engine revolution within the competition department. Lamborghini on the other hand, went all out with a radical transverse-rear-engine layout on their staggering new Miura of 1966. The arrival of the impossibly low, svelte Miura signaled alarm bells for many within Ferrari, as suddenly the gorgeous 275GTB/4 was looking archaic in the face of the new kid from Sant’Agata. Pininfarina’s design chief at the time, Leonardo Fiavoranti, was never a huge fan of the 275 GTB, and even while the car was still relatively new, he was inspired to take a bare chassis and engine from the floor and mock up a new design – all in his spare time. The muscular new shape was more modern than the 275, being wider all round, with its crisp edges and signature plexiglass band across the nose. It so impressed Enzo that the green light was given for production. When the 365GTB/4 “Daytona” was introduced at the 1968 Paris Salon, the reception was lukewarm given the sensation caused by the radical Miura. The car was seen by the press as too orthodox in comparison, but Enzo was no fool. While Lamborghini struggled with development of the Miura, the 365GTB/4 relied on a proven platform that was reliable, strong and delivered storming performance. In spite of its big GT nature, the Daytona was a true supercar, delivering a 0-100mph sprint in 12.6 second on the way to a 174mph top speed. Like the 275GTB/4 before it, American importer Luigi Chinetti lobbied the factory to offer a convertible version for the important American marketplace. While the subsequent 122 examples is a mere fraction of total Daytona production, it was certainly more than the scant ten versions of the 275 GTS/4 NART Spyder that preceded it. The Daytona shape lends itself well to having the roof lopped off, and over the years a number of coupes have been converted into spyders by different coachbuilders. One of the most successful and respected of those is Richard Straman. An engineer and coachbuilder, Straman has built numerous convertible conversions for Ferraris ranging from the 275 GTB to the 550 Maranello. His work his highly regarded for its quality engineering and factory-quality finish work, and as such, any open-topped Ferrari to carry the Straman name is given a blessing by collectors and experts alike. This 1971 365 GTB/4 Daytona, S/N 13941 is a very early American market car, the third such example produced in US-specification. It was originally offered via Luigi Chinetti Motors, and the history picks up via its first time advertised for sale by Ron White of Ohio in 1974. It passed through a few hands in the 1970s before finding its way to the hands of Joe Alphabet, a California-based dealer of used Italian exotica, as well as an early supplier of Ferrari GTO replicas. During Alphabet’s ownership, 13941 received a freshening and upgraded with competition-style cosmetics. Shortly afterward, the car was sold and converted by Richard Straman to spyder configuration. By the mid-1980s this Daytona found a long term owner in Mike Walther of St. Louis, Missouri who kept the car in his care for 11 years. It was then offered by respected Ferrari dealer Mike Sheehan in 1998, and it found its second long-term owner who enjoyed it for a further 20 years and performed much of the restoration work it wears today. In 2016, S/N13941 was repainted in beautiful Fly Yellow and the interior trimmed in fresh tan hides. It presents today in excellent condition, with excellent quality paint and detailing. Body panels are crisp and straight, with precise panel gaps, and the Straman spyder conversion is executed to coachbuilder standards; fully finished with an excellent folding top and a nicely fitted tan leather boot. Bright stainless, chrome and alloy trim is all in fine condition, and the car sits on freshly refurbished Cromodora knock-off alloy wheels with proper three-eared wheel nuts, all wrapped in correct Michelin XWX rolling stock. Along with the freshly restored body, the interior was treated to a full retrim in attractive light tan leather. The seats appear in very good order, still looking quite fresh and showing almost no signs of use. The same tan leather also covers the sills, door panels and console; all executed to the same high quality standard. The Daytona’s signature black “mousehair” dash has been carefully recovered, and the instruments appear crystal clear in the correct silver binnacle. A period correct Becker Mexico resides in its signature vertical position in the console alongside the gated shifter. Switchgear is all in fine order including the controls for the factory air-conditioning system which remains intact. Beneath the bonnet is the star of the show; Ferrari’s 4.4 liter, Tipo 251 quad-cam V12 that sends its 350 highly-energetic horses through a 5-speed transaxle. In keeping with the rest of this car, the engine is detailed with many correct fittings and finishes. Most importantly, it runs and drives beautifully, sounding crisp and healthy through the correct Ansa exhaust system. This striking Ferrari Daytona Spyder is an outstanding choice for an enthusiast seeking a high quality, open-topped Daytona at a fraction of the cost of one of the 122 NART cars. It also benefits from well-known history and excellent presentation, and, true to form, proves to be an absolute thrill to drive.  

    Last update: 4 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1965 Jaguar XKE Coupe

    $169,500(£125,599.50)

    To anyone even remotely interested in automobiles, the Jaguar XKE (or E-Type if you prefer) hardly needs an introduction. The seminal sixties sports car has been a regular inclusion in various “top cars ever” lists, often occupying hallowed space occupied by cars like the Ford Model T and VW Beetle. But unlike its more pedestrian counterparts, the E-Type is unusual in that it was not a particularly ground-breaking technical marvel, nor did it provide wheels for the masses. Rather, it was the simple fact that the E-Type was staggeringly beautiful that has allowed it to become such a legend. But beyond those looks, Jaguar incorporated technology previously reserved for exotic sports racing cars in a package that was produced on a relatively mass scale, allowing it to cost half that of a comparable competitor. The E-Type first shocked the world at the 1961 Geneva Motor Show. At a time when a Corvette had a live rear axle, drum brakes and shared its underpinnings with 1950s passenger cars, the E-Type hit the scene with a twin overhead cam inline six, four-wheel independent suspension, semi-monocoque construction, rack and pinion steering, and four-wheel disc brakes; much of which was shared with the LeMans winning D-Type. That technology was wrapped in a svelte and beautiful body designed by Malcolm Sayer, and they managed to incorporate all of that exoticism while keeping the price below $6000. While not exactly cheap, it was well below that of any other car that could hit 150mph while looking so incredibly good! Jaguar continued to improve the car through its long life; with most agreeing that the sweet spot is found with the 4.2 liter Series 1 cars. The 4.2-liter Series 1 cars featured an improved interior with adjustable seats, improved braking via a new vacuum servo, an all-synchro four-speed manual transmission, and additional torque massaged from the 265 horsepower inline six. The Series 1 4.2 liter cars remain the most desirable of the production E-types, and among the best to drive. More than 30,000 examples of the Series 1 were built (in both 3.8 and 4.2 liter form) so they remain plentiful – yet their iconic style and groundbreaking performance make them important enough to feature in some of the most significant collections in the world. Whether you find the fixed head coupe or the open two-seater the more attractive E-Type is a matter of personal taste, however, it is difficult to deny the purity of form that the fixed head coupe exhibits, particularly in the stunning black on black combination of our featured example. This 1965 Jaguar E-Type is a highly desirable 4.2 liter fixed head coupe that was restored to a high standard by marque experts in 2007. It is a verified numbers-matching example with a Jaguar Heritage Trust certificate confirming its original black on black color combination. The restoration and subsequent show successes are well documented, with the most notable results being a 999.80 score at a JCNA event, and an AACA National First Prize in 2014. Since the restoration was completed, it has seen careful use but remains in beautiful condition with an inviting, attractive nature. The black paintwork presents in beautiful condition, with exquisitely straight panels and excellent, consistent gaps. The E-type body was famously un-cluttered with heavy trim or detailing, with thin boomerang-like bumpers that complement the curves. The bumpers on this car have been restored to a high standard and at great expense, showing in excellent condition. Chrome wire wheels are shod with fresh blackwall Vredestein radials, an excellent tire which combines modern handling and construction with period-correct tread patterns. Quality presentation continues on the interior, with black leather and carpeting as original presenting in very good condition. The seats do show just few very slight creases from use, which only serve to make this beautiful car more inviting to drive. Interior panels, dash, sill coverings and headlining are correct and in excellent order. Likewise, the original Smiths instruments have been restored to original specification. In the boot, Hardura panels cover the spare tire well which houses an original-type tool roll, jack and bag as well as a dead-blow hammer and non-marring knock-off tool. The 4.2 liter “XK” inline six is the correct original unit as verified by the Heritage Certificate (#7E4041-9). As one would expect given the past show results, it is presented in beautiful condition with highly polished cam covers, carburetor dashpots and intake manifold. The exhaust manifolds are finished in correct porcelain black and the brake booster, heater box and other accessories are correctly detailed with factory-style labels and markings. The visible front suspension arms and uprights are correctly coated in silver as original, and the body-color chassis legs remain in very good order. This beautifully presented E-Type Fixed Head Coupe is an outstanding example of the car that has come to define Jaguar to this day. The quality restoration has held up very well since completion, and this lovely car remains very much worthy of show while having matured slightly, making it also a fine choice for grand touring.

    Last update: 1 Day Old
    For sale
  • 1971 Iso Lele Coupe

    $99,500(£73,729.50)

    The story of this Italian sports car begins, oddly enough, with Isothermos, an Italian refrigerator manufacturer founded in Genoa Italy in 1939. The company was taken over in 1942 by Renzo Rivolta, a car-crazy engineer and industrialist who soon ended refrigerator production and moved the company to Bresso, Italy where they began production of high-quality motorcycles. Isomotos, as they were known, were very well-built bikes with excellent performance, and despite being rather more expensive than the competition, proved popular with the Italian public. While motorcycles were critical in getting war-torn Italy back on wheels, buyers needed something more practical for year round use and runs to the shops. The solution came in the form of the Iso Isetta bubble car, a cheap, simple three (or four, depending on year and spec) wheeled micro car with a motorbike engine and room for two adults and some groceries. The Isetta was a moderate success in the home market, but it was Rivolta’s decision to sell the design rights to other companies that proved his biggest stroke of genius. Most notably, BMW produced a version of the Isetta that became one of the most popular microcars in Germany, exactly what the physically and economically devastated nation needed post-war. Renzo Rivolta’s business acumen afforded him the cash he needed to move decidedly upmarket with a line of elegant and stylish GT cars to take on the likes of Ferrari and Maserati. His new cars utilized Italian designed chassis and bodies built by the legendary Carrozerria of the day, but to save on development costs, he utilized affordable and reliable American V8 horsepower, first from Chevrolet, and later from Ford. After Renzo’s death in 1966, his son Piero took over operations and continued to expand upon his father’s dream by adding additional models and even making a moderately successful foray into motorsport. The Lele (named for Piero’s wife Lele Rivolta) debuted in 1969 as part of a three-car lineup that included the 2-seat Grifo and the four-door Fidia with the four-seat GT Lele positioned between the two. The Lele was Piero Rivolta’s answer to the Lamborghini Espada, Maserati Mexico and the Ferrari 365 2+2; a uniquely styled GT coupe which bore more than a passing resemblance to the Espada, particularly in the long and dramatic fastback roofline and slightly chunky proportions. This is hardly coincidence as both cars were styled by Bertone at about the same time. From 1969 through 1972, the Lele was powered by Chevrolet’s 327 and 350 V8 engines. From 1972 through the company’s demise in 1974, the cars utilized the big Ford 351 Cleveland engine. Regardless of the power plant, the Lele proved a formidable competitor in the GT car class, delivering excellent performance and handling in a stylish and distinct body. Approximately 260 examples were produced through all series until Iso closed its doors in 1974, making them exceedingly rare and desirable today. This fine example is chassis 50.0087, a 1971 model equipped from new with Chevrolet’s 350 cubic inch, 300 horsepower engine backed by a 5-speed manual transmission. Finished in white over a rich dark red leather cabin, this is an extremely well-maintained and highly original car that has never been fully restored. It is crisp and stylish in its white paintwork, which is a very high quality respray. The Bertone-styled bodywork is straight and tidy, with excellent panel gaps and nice, sharp feature lines. Fine details abound, such as the double-hash vents behind the wheels, and the distinct half-covered headlamps that recall other famous Bertone designs such as the Lamborghini Espada, Jarama, and Alfa Romeo Montreal. Chrome trim is used sparingly, on the bumpers, window trims and in delicate strips along the sills, all of which presents in excellent condition. The car rides on the signature, funky knock-off alloy wheels cast by Campagnolo for Iso. The luxurious four-place cabin is trimmed in dark red leather which is in lovely original condition, having taking on a warm and welcoming patina. The leather has been very well cared-for, and remains supple and free of excessive wear or damage. Dark red carpets are also excellent and likely original, as are the door and interior quarter panels and the ivory headliner. Switchgear is all in good order, and the original Personal steering wheel, Jaeger clock, and Becker Grand Prix AM/FM stereo remain in place and in great condition. Importantly, the Iso Lele is a very well sorted and soundly engineered automobile that returns fabulous performance from the stout and reliable Chevrolet small-block V8. The Chevy engine is backed by a sophisticated 5-speed ZF gearbox which allows the V8 to stretch its legs, giving the Lele continent-crushing ability, even with four passengers aboard. The engine is tidy and well-detailed, showing signs of regular and professional maintenance, even retaining the original quilted hood insulation pad. This Lele runs and drives beautifully, emitting a glorious growl that is part American muscle, part Italian sophisticate. This rare and stylish Iso Lele is a wonderful and well-sorted example in very desirable specifications that benefits from many years of attentive care, now ready for its next keeper to fully enjoy.

    Last update: 7 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1969 Mercedes-Benz 280SE Convertible

    $169,500(£125,599.50)

    Mercedes-Benz’s fabulous W111 coupe and cabriolet are considered by many enthusiasts to be the finest built and best performing luxury GT cars of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Handsome and luxurious, the glamorous cabriolet and its elegant coupe sibling offered impeccable style and luxury paired with previously unheard-of levels of build quality. These two-door variants shared a basic platform and drivetrain with the four-door “Heckflosse” (fin tail) sedans, but offered with a very different styling treatment that traded fins for more rounded and better resolved detailing at the rear. While the sedans had upright styling along with somewhat awkward tail fins that were clearly pandering to the American market, the coupe and cabrio were more modern, more subdued and much more timeless in appearance.  The styling of the 280SE 2-door inspired that of the Heckflosse’s replacement, the W108, and the two-door W111 outlasted its befinned four-door counterpart by several years. Mechanically, a wide variety of gasoline and diesel engines were offered. However, since the coupe and cabrio were reserved for the higher classes, choices were limited mainly to six cylinder carbureted and fuel injected petrol engines. Late in production, Mercedes shoehorned their all-aluminum 3.5 liter V8 into the W111 chassis, which transformed the car from an elegant cruiser into one of the most capable and advanced GT cars of the era. The 280SE, particularly in cabriolet form, has become one of the most desirable of all post-war Mercedes this side of the 300SL. They represent the end of the hand-built era and are exceptionally fine cars to drive. Collectors have taken notice and values have risen accordingly in the past several years. This 1969 280SE Cabriolet is a very attractive and well-sorted example that is ideally suited for regular enjoyment or casual show. It is finished in a very attractive color combination of Gray Blue (DB906) metallic with a dark blue top and dark blue leather trim. The body is very straight with excellent factory-quality panel fit and lovely glossy paintwork. These cars were exceptionally well engineered and constructed, with Mercedes going so far as to make much of the bright trim in chrome-on-brass. Our car has high quality plating on the grille, window trims, sills and very nice, straight bumpers. The front end features original US-spec headlamps and a pair of factory fog lamps with amber lenses. It rides on correct steel wheels with full, color-keyed wheel covers and correct narrow whitewall tires. Overall it is an absolutely gorgeous yet totally drivable car that has benefitted from plenty of care. The luxurious cabin is certainly one of the highlights of this 280SE cabriolet. Big, comfortable chairs up front offer exceptional comfort, while a rear bench offers plenty of room for at least two additional adults. The dark blue leather upholstery is in good condition, trimmed using correct grain hides and perforated inserts. Front and rear seats, as well as blue carpets present in excellent order and the door panels appear to be very well preserved originals. Beautiful wood trim graces the fascia, upper dash, and A-pillars, all of which have been fully restored to a very high standard. The blue German canvas convertible top is in overall excellent condition, and features a matching blue canvas boot. This car is well equipped with desirable options including air conditioning, power windows, floor shift automatic transmission, and a Becker Mexico AM/FM stereo. The trunk is fitted with the correct rubber floor mat, while the spare wheel, jack and handle are in correct factory locations. There is even a very rare and very cool period Mercedes-Benz accessory cleaning kit found in the trunk. Mercedes-Benz’s legendary 2.8 liter fuel-injected inline six presents in clean, tidy condition in the engine bay. It is well detailed, and while not to concours standards, remains extremely well presented. Importantly, this example is an excellent performer, with the Bosch mechanical fuel injection allowing for easy starts, and flexible performance through the rev range. The engine is smooth, quiet and runs strong with excellent shifts from the automatic transmission. Road manners are outstanding, as one should expect from these beautifully over-engineered cars. These are exceptionally good cars that perform in a way that makes them seem much younger than they are. Strong brakes, excellent steering and a crisp automatic transmission all combine to make the 280SE a surprisingly good all-round touring car that is equally at home tootling around town, top-down cruising on a coastal road, or up on the motorway for a long-distance run. Having the added bonus of a top that goes down, as well as strong collectability in today’s market, this attractive and high-quality 280SE is sure to please its next keeper.  

    Last update: 7 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1931 Ford Model AA Tanker

    $39,500(£29,269.50)

    Alongside the ground-breaking, world-changing Model T passenger cars that Henry Ford built by the millions, he simultaneously changed the scope of the the commercial truck market with the Model TT. The medium-duty TT was built in smaller numbers (approximately 1.4 million to the 15 million Model T cars) yet still in massive quantities and at a much cheaper price compared to its competition, allowing many businesses to motorize their operations for the first time. Based upon the standard Model T passenger car, the TT was enhanced for a 1-ton capacity and heavy-duty service. It proved popular with bus builders, local delivery businesses and construction companies. But as the Model T reached the end of its production, competitive trucks were becoming ever more car-like and easy to operate, something that was never the TT’s strong point. With the introduction of the vastly refined Model A in 1927, Ford replaced the Model TT with the fully revised AA truck. Like its predecessor, the AA shared its engine, main body, and basic layout with its lighter duty sibling. The AA featured an all new frame built to handle the rigors of work, as well as oversized four-wheel drum brakes and heavy-duty wheels. Power came from the same 3.3 liter, 201 cubic inch four-cylinder engine as the passenger car but was fitted with a larger radiator and backed by a new four-speed gearbox with substantially lower ratios and a reverse lockout. The suspension was much like the A up front, with a transverse leaf spring on a solid beam axle. In the rear, early trucks got a worm-drive rear axle and heavy-duty leaf springs, with later trucks gaining a ring-and-pinion axle. The AA was a work truck first and foremost, but was simple to operate and easy to service as so many parts were in common with the standard Model A.  It also shared much of the body work with the A, making it a rather good looking machine as well. The Ford factory and countless aftermarket suppliers offered a variety of commercial bodies from ambulances to dump trucks to tankers. The AA was a global success for Ford, with Model AA trucks serving in military and civilian duty around the world for many years to come. This wonderful 1931 Ford Model AA is a desirable late production model benefitting from many of the running changes made over the course of Model A production. It is presented in fabulous condition, with a period appropriate and authentically presented Gilmore Gasoline tanker body finished in the famous Gilmore “Red Lion” red and yellow livery. It was formerly part of the Pat Phinny collection of Carmel California where it was often displayed at Pat’s Baja Cantina restaurant; a sort of mecca for gearheads - loaded to the gills with genuine motoring memorabilia. This Model AA is a beautifully restored truck, with distinct red cab and hood accented with black fenders, a yellow swage line and a yellow tanker body. The base paint quality is excellent, and the body is very straight with factory-appropriate panel fit and fine detailing. Gilmore livery on the doors, tank, and roof-mounted placard has all been painstakingly and beautifully hand-painted. The truck is equipped with the optional dual-rear wheel axle, and the factory correct Budd wheels are finished in black and wrapped in Firestone blackwall tires as would have been appropriate when new. A single side-mount spare wheel can be fitted front or rear, and the truck features an interesting recess in the driver’s door to clear the oversized spare wheel. The tanker body appears to be an authentic piece, and is of course beautifully restored and presented with correct-type fenders, fittings, gorgeous hand-painted signage and a heavy-duty rear bumper. Inside is essentially standard fare for anyone familiar with the Model A passenger car, but the AA’s were obviously very basic in specification. Like the rest of the truck, it has been restored to a correct and good-quality standard with correct-type upholstery material on the seat and door cards, a hard-wearing rubber mat for commercial duty and very basic controls. The shift lever retains the correct reverse lockout for the four-speed gearbox and the original steering wheel is in excellent condition. Ford’s small but mighty four-cylinder engine presents very well with mainly correct detailing and paint finishes. It runs well, starting easily and pulling the big AA truck along admirably, thanks to the low gearing in the four-speed transmission. While speeding will not be much of a concern, it is no doubt a delightful thing to drive, relying on the easy, low-revving and torquey nature of the engine, and of course turning heads with those stunning looks. With its high quality presentation and well-executed restoration in period correct livery, this charming and attractive Ford AA Tanker would be most welcome at casual shows, used in business promotion or simply to cruise to your favorite local. Regardless of how it gets enjoyed, it is certain to be a conversation piece wherever it goes.

    Last update: 14 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1963 Morgan Plus 4 Plus Coupe

    $179,500(£133,009.50)

    In 1963, Morgan Motors unveiled a very un-Morgan-like sports car at the annual Earls Court Motor Show. Sitting alongside its traditional, 30s-styled machines was a glassfiber-bodied coupe unlike anything produced by the company before. The Morgan Motor Company was founded in 1909 by H.F.S. Morgan, who produced a series of 3-wheeled cyclecars for the first twenty-seven years of the firm. Four wheeled vehicles didn’t arrive until 1936 with the aptly named 4-4 (four wheels, four cylinders), a car which would form the basis for virtually every Morgan produced through to today. It seemed that once Morgan found a formula that worked, they stuck with it doggedly. The early cars, known colloquially as “flat-rad” were subtly restyled in the late 1950s to feature a more rounded radiator shroud and grille that remains a trademark to this day; a look that enthusiasts have come to expect from a Morgan. And much like Morgan the company, Morgan buyers have certain expectations about what a Morgan should be, how it should look and how it should be built. “Quirky and staunchly traditional” are terms that can be used to describe both Morgan sports cars and their loyal enthusiasts. With that background, it is perhaps easier to understand why Peter Morgan’s Plus 4 Plus was not widely accepted or understood when it made its appearance at Earls Court. The Plus 4 Plus was a dramatic departure for the company – while it utilized a fairly standard Plus 4 chassis and Triumph TR4 engine, it was wrapped in a svelte, stylish and fully enveloped body that only hinted at its Morgan roots via the familiar radiator grille. Eschewing the traditional separate fenders and pre-war looks, the Plus 4 Plus looked completely modern – and yet it still retained the traditional chassis with its sliding pillar front suspension and cart-sprung rear axle. Instead of steel, the new car was bodied in fiberglass (produced by E.B. Plastics Ltd) that was reinforced with steel tubing and structural plywood. The new Morgan was considerably lighter than the Triumph TR4 that shared its running gear, so performance was quite brisk. Given the fact that it rode on a standard Plus 4 chassis, the Plus 4 Plus shared its sibling’s excellent handling and braking – cornering flat, with direct and precise unassisted steering. Despite its strengths, the car was a bit of an anomaly, one that inadvertently alienated traditional Morgan buyers with its modern style, yet didn’t appeal to new customers because of its quirky, seemingly outdated underpinnings. As a result, the Plus 4 Plus was a commercial failure, with just 26 examples produced in total over four years. Of course, modern opinions have changed and the Plus 4 Plus is a now a serious and highly desirable collector car, a holy grail of sorts among cars from the famous Malvern-based marque. While any Morgan Plus 4 Plus is a very special machine, our featured car stands above the others in the fact that it was the very first production example that was exhibited at the Earls Court Motor Show in 1963. In addition, there are photos of this car being used by Peter Morgan himself. It retains its original registration number of DUY997B as well as its tax disc from December of 1963. The exceptional history is backed by an exquisite restoration performed by the British car experts at Safety Fast Restoration of Mansfield, Ohio to concours standards. This rare Plus 4 Plus presents in lovely condition, wearing attractive maroon paintwork over the excellent composite body. The restoration was done to a very high standard of quality, but was also carefully judged as to not erase the character of Morgan’s first fiberglass car. The paint and detailing are to a very high level, which is reflected in the car’s award-winning appearances at world-class events such as the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in 2015 and the Ault Park Concours d’Elegance. The body, which retains factory-appropriate gaps and panel fit, is nicely detailed with an original luggage rack, Lucas fog lamps and chrome wire wheels shod with correct type Michelin XAS radial tires. Morgan continued the modern experience with its cozy, two-passenger fixed-head cockpit. The traditional plank dash was ditched in favor of a stylish and modern molded piece that was fitted with an array of standard Morgan instrumentation in an aircraft style layout. In our car, the instruments back a Brooklands four-spoke banjo-type steering wheel and lovely gray leather upholstery covers the seats and door cards, while wind-up windows kept occupants dry in all weather conditions – a far cry from the fussy and rudimentary weather equipment of its sibling models. The leather seats, carpets and interior fittings have been restored to show-quality standards in keeping with the rest of this fine automobile. Triumph’s gutsy and eager 110 horsepower engine is essentially unchanged as lifted from the TR4A. It is backed with a four-speed manual gearbox that features synchronizers on the top three cogs. The unit is detailed to factory-correct standards and presents in excellent order in the engine bay. Fully restored by British sports car specialists, it runs and drives beautifully, with that signature Morgan nimbleness and darty precision, as well as the addicting torque and rasp from the Triumph four-cylinder. This exceptionally rare and desirable Morgan not only wears a fabulous restoration, but it is the very first production example and perhaps the most famous of all 26 Plus 4 Pluses constructed, having first appearing for the world to see at the Earls Court Motor Show. Since the restoration was completed, it remains in outstanding show-quality condition and is ready for action on the road or concours circuit.

    Last update: 15 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1936 MG PB Roadster

    $128,500(£95,218.50)

    The MG P-Type, first introduced in 1934, superseded the J-Type Midget and formed the foundation on which the marque’s famous T-Series would be built. The P-Type was powered by an 847cc four cylinder engine - adapted from the Morris Minor and Wolseley Ten - that was the last road going MG to feature Cecil Kimber’s advanced overhead cam cylinder head. For the P-Type, an additional main bearing was added to address J-Type’s unfortunate tendency to suffer catastrophic failures at high RPM due to crank deflection. The addition of the third main bearing now made the engine more than strong enough to handle the rigors of competition and forced induction, as MG was still very much a company that built road cars to support its sporting exploits. In the face of increasing competition, the MG replaced the PA with the PB in 1935. The updated PB featured a 939 cc version of the same OHC four-cylinder engine, now producing a very useful 43 horsepower in standard tune. Similar versions of the engine was also used in the very rapid Q-Type (fewer than 10 built), sleeved down to 750cc for racing in the Voiturette classes, and supercharged with a Zoller or Marshall blower to produce upwards of 146 horsepower in “Sprint” specification. Of course, the exotic Q-Type was strictly a competition machine, but it inspired many owners to upgrade their P-Types accordingly as many were bought by sporting enthusiasts who used their road going MGs in casual motorsport events such as rallies, hillclimbs and road racing. In the never-ending quest for speed, a number of P-Type owners modified their cars by shedding accessories and trim, fitting superchargers and even fitting lightweight bodywork. A number of wonderfully creative and beautiful pre-war MG Specials still exist and compete today in vintage hillclimbs and road racing events. This fantastic 1936 MG PB is a wonderful example of the MG Special concept taken to the extreme. Its fabulous bodywork is hand made in aluminum, taking many styling cues from the works Q-Type racing cars. The body, which was built in Argentina during the car’s time there, has been left in bare alloy for maximum effect, a period touch that would have been used to save weight (consider the weight of a gallon of paint!), allowing one to fully appreciate the craftsmanship through the visible welds, tool marks and exposed rivets. The traditional MG radiator grille sweeps into a louvered bonnet and to the scuttle which is faired to accommodate the steering wheel. The cockpit then flows into a tapered tail, de rigueur for the day. 19-inch wheels are correct for the car, and finished in an attractive shade of dark red that complements the interior and provides some color against the bare polished body. Cycle wings are held in place with simple steel brackets, and the rear section of the tail is hinged for access to the battery and fuel cell. The body is adorned with myriad period details including correct P-type headlamps, twin quick-release fuel fillers, a single side-mount spare with leather straps, leather bonnet hold-down straps, a correct-style faired-in rear view mirror, Brooklands Aeroscreen, mesh radiator stone guard, and a fabulous period-correct supercharger fairing with the MG octagon logo proudly presented. This PB is indeed supercharged, fitted with a period appropriate blower. While the unit is unmarked, it is likely a typical surplus aircraft cockpit pressurizer that was commonly fitted in the early post-war years. The 939cc engine is very well detailed with a polished cam cover, correctly presented ancillaries, and a proper finned alloy inlet manifold with the MG crest. The engine breathes through an exhaust system that travels below the car, then up and over the rear axle, exiting through a polished Brooklands-type exhaust tip. An upgraded water pump ensures cool operation and a modern-type S.U. fuel pump keeps the eager little engine fed. The PB runs very well, emitting a magnificent bark through the exhaust. The chassis is painted black as correct for a PB, and it is very well detailed with items such as correct 9-inch brake drums. The original mechanical brakes have been upgraded to hydraulic actuation to account for the additional horsepower and lightened bodywork. The simple cockpit is trimmed in red leather which appears just broken-in and rather inviting. A rare period Bluemels steering wheel features a quick-release hub, and the polished alloy dash is adorned with an array of period English instruments, a mix of Jaeger and Smith dials. Red carpets are in excellent condition, and there’s just enough room for a driver and co-driver; so long as the two have a good working relationship! This fabulous MG PB special is a high quality car, having been completed in the early 2000s and remaining in a private collection since. In addition to its rarity (one of just 526 produced) it has loads of fine period detailing and beautiful craftsmanship that is sure to turn heads. This would be a fabulous machine for a hardcore vintage rally enthusiast, for use in hillclimbs and sprints, or to simply savor on the road, enjoying the positively addicting experience that only a gutsy pre-war MG can provide.

    Last update: 15 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1936 Auburn 852 Supercharged Phaeton

    $139,500(£103,369.50)

    Since its inception in 1903, Auburn was noted for producing reliable, good quality automobiles, though it wasn’t until E.L. Cord’s arrival in 1924 that they began to offer the more exciting products they are best known for. The late 20’s and early 30’s were the firm’s most successful years, with sporting Auburns finding favor with celebrities and stars of the time. But by 1935, things were starting to look fairly grim for the Auburn Automobile Company. Their parent, the Cord Corporation, was pulling back financial support of automobile production to focus their efforts on the burgeoning aviation industry. E.L. Cord had admitted several years prior that he was losing interest in car production, as the economies of scale enjoyed by the likes of Ford and GM were too much for a smaller manufacturer to handle. Despite the writing being on the wall for Auburn, the company brought in Gordon Buehrig to handle a restyling of the line for the 1935 season. As so often happened when independent manufacturers were facing the end, their final product was among the best they ever offered, and the sporty, dramatic styling from Buehrig certainly helped attract plenty of attention. Mechanically, the Lycoming inline eight-cylinder engine was largely unchanged with the notable exception of the optional Schwitzer-Cummins centrifugal supercharger which added a healthy and welcome boost in power above 2,000 rpm. Few changes were made for 1936 which proved to be the final year of Auburn production. E.L. Cord had one more flourish with the Cord 810/812, but he was essentially out of the car business by the end of 1937. This 1936 Auburn 852 Supercharged Phaeton is from the final year of Auburn production, wearing a good quality older restoration and well-equipped with many desirable options. The pretty Gordon Buehrig styling is finished in Cigarette Cream, a period correct color made famous on 852 speedsters as well as on the Cord 810. The body is very straight, showing a high quality restoration, and the doors and deck lids exhibit very good shutlines. The paintwork does show a few minor flaws and chips that are expected from a car that has been enjoyed since completion, but it remains inherently sound with no peeling or cracking in the finish. This was a very high-end car when new, and is well accessorized with polished cover on the single side-mount spare wheel, polished outside exhaust pipes unique to the supercharged models, disc wheel covers, Trippe lights and a fold-down windscreen. Chrome quality is generally quite good, though a few areas such as on the rear bumper do show some age. Like the exterior, the interior presents very well, having been nicely preserved since the restoration and showing little wear. The brown leather upholstery and light brown carpets complement the cream-yellow paint nicely. Likewise, the dark brown canvas top is a well-judged touch that brings the paint and interior together quite well. Upholstery quality both front and rear is very good, with good door panels and driver-quality chrome fittings, while the steering wheel and switchgear are in very good original condition. The interior design eschews traditional wood trim for a modern, streamlined approach. The dash in particular is fabulous; with deco-style instruments arranged in damascene-pattern instrument panel, topped with a chrome header. Auburn’s Phaeton body style is much like a convertible sedan, offering all-weather comfort with roll up windows that seal against a full folding top. In addition to the side glass, the B-pillars and windscreen fold away for a fully open and sporting experience. With the top folded and windows down, the factory supercharged Lycoming inline eight-cylinder engine can be fully enjoyed. It has been recently detailed and presents very well in correct colors. It is tidy and clean, showing light use, and benefitting from fresh paint with good quality, period-correct fittings. The engine is mated to a manual gearbox which sends power through the optional Dual Ratio rear axle, essentially giving the car an overdrive and allowing for surprising top-end performance.   All told, this is a very nice quality example of the rare and desirable Auburn 852 Supercharged Phaeton. The older restoration has held up well and it remains very attractive, quite well suited for CCCA CARavan tours, ACD Club events or family enjoyment.    

    Last update: 11 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1953 Ferrari 166MM Barchetta

    POA

    It can be argued that the little 166, Ferrari’s seminal early 1950s sports racing car, is the most important model in the marque’s 70 year history. While there been faster, sleeker, more exotic Ferraris that have conquered the great races of the world, it is the tiny, jewel-like 166 that truly marked the intersection of Scuderia Ferrari the race team and Ferrari the constructor. Ferrari 166 drivers such as Eugenio Castellotti, Luigi Chinetti, Alberto Ascari and Clementi Biondetti put Ferrari on the map as a world-class constructor of race-winning cars that could be bought by privateers. The 166 was the first Ferrari to win at the Mille Miglia with Biondetti in a 166 S (the MM moniker following to commemorate that momentous win). Biondetti repeated that feat a year later, while wins at Silverstone, the Targa Florio and countless other events soon came pouring in. In 1949, a 166 MM Barchetta was the first Ferrari to score an outright victory at LeMans after an heroic effort by Chinetti and just two weeks later, a 166 won the 24 hour race at Spa Francorchamps. Luigi Chinetti’s move to the United States and his establishment of Ferrari North America was a pivotal moment for Ferrari and the 166 MM. The burgeoning road racing scene in the USA was gaining tremendous momentum, and wealthy car owners and drivers began purchasing “gently used” Ferrari sports racers such as the 166 MM at a feverish rate. It soon became clear that to win, you needed a Ferrari. So the 166 again proved itself as a landmark machine: The car that established Ferrari in the critical North American market. One might think that Ferrari employed a “power in numbers” technique to achieve such success, but in reality, a mere 46 examples of the gorgeous little 166 were built between 1948 and 1953, with those 46 cars going on to win a tremendous amount of races. As was typical for Ferrari, numerous coachbuilders applied their craft to the robust 166 chassis, including Stabilimenti Farina, Touring, and Zagato. These cars were tools for racing so they were often used hard and cast aside when a newer, faster machine was made available. Inevitably, some were crashed and rebuilt, blown up and fitted with new engines, or had other major assemblies replaced or upgraded as needed. As a result, a scant few survived wearing most or all of their original components intact. Our featured example is a highly desirable 166MM/53, wearing S/N 0300M, which was dispatched from the Ferrari works on April 1, 1953 wearing Vignale Berlinetta coachwork as per the build sheet. The 8th of just 13 Series II 166 MM’s produced, it was delivered via Garage Francorchamps to Jacques Herzet of Belgium who immediately set about competing in his lovely new acquisition. On May 17th of that year, Herzet competed in the Coupe des Spa, finishing second overall in is very first outing with the 166; no doubt a sign of things to come and hinting that his 166 MM had a particularly potent V12 under the bonnet. He enjoyed a tremendous run of success with the car, finishing on the podium in events such as the Coppa D’Oro, Rallye des Alpes, and a class win and 3rd overall on the grueling Liege Rome Liege rally. Herzet went on to finish second in the inaugural European Rally Championship in 1953; a remarkable achievement for a privateer entry. Herzet’s success was no doubt aided by his young co-driver, a then-18-year old Lucien Bianchi, who would himself go on to race in Formula 1, win the Tour de France Auto on multiple occasions, and win the 1968 Le Mans 24H overall in a Ford GT40. When the Belgian weather turned cold, Mr. Herzet shipped his beloved 166 to South America and continued to compete; enjoying many more top finishes in Brazil. But the rigors of sport had taken their toll on the fragile Vignale coachwork, so less than a year after taking delivery of 0300M, he returned it to Belgium, entrusting it in the hands of designer and coachbuilder Martial Oblin. The brief was simple – make the car look fresh, but also make it lighter and thus more competitive. Oblin created a stunning design in the “Barchetta” (little boat) style. Gently sloping front fenders gave way to cut down doors that are highlighted by beautiful curved haunches. Form follows function with a bulged hood scoop to feed the trio of Weber carburetors, and a simple cut-down Perspex screen runs the width of the cockpit, revealing at this car’s purpose as a road-rally competitor. The Oblin body was indeed lighter, making the 166 a good deal quicker as a result. The completed car was shown at the 1955 Brussels Motor Show in a stunning and highly unusual matte charcoal color scheme, accented by a deep red stripe running down the center and along the rockers. This paint effect was very rare for the time and the car caused quite a stir, earning a place in the 1955 Ferrari Yearbook. Despite its show stopping appearance, Mr. Herzet returned to competition with 0300M in numerous venues across Europe. Successful runs continued through the end of his tenure with the car in 1957. Rather unusually for the time, the majority of 0300M’s competition achievements came with the same driver/co-driver combination almost from day one. In 1957 and following it’s truly remarkable time with Herzet, 166 MM 0300M was sold to Mr. Jean de Dobbeleer, a former Bugatti Agent for Belgium. He retained the car through 1966, and is credited for preserving it in its original condition at a time when used racing cars were considered throwaway items. From de Dobbeleer’s hands, it was sold to a Mr. Ed Bond of Connecticut, USA who cared for the car from 1966-1970 until passing it to Steve McGeary of Florida (1970-1975), and then on to Robert Cressman, also of Florida, who kept the car through 1977. All the while, the Oblin Ferrari was sympathetically kept in remarkably original condition; unmolested and mechanically unaltered from the time it was in the hands of its original owner. 0300M then found a most enthusiastic and caring owner in Robert Selz, who carefully restored the car and enjoyed it for the next 35 years, participating in many events including the Mille Miglia in 2005 and 2009. With a new owner in 2012 came a very careful and sympathetic restoration to Brussels Motor Show specification in the hands of Ferrari experts Charlie Webb and Kent Bain of Automotive Restorations, Inc. in Connecticut. Mr. Webb has been responsible many concours-winning Ferraris at venues such as Pebble Beach and Villa d’Este. During this time, 0300M was inspected and researched by Marcel Massini who found it to be in staggeringly original condition, particularly for a car with such an accomplished race history. It retains its original chassis, engine, gearbox, and rear axle, all of which are truly remarkable for a machine with such an extensive racing pedigree. Since the restoration was completed, the car was shown at the 2013 Cavallino Classic and the 2013 St. James Concours in London. In the hands of its most recent owner, 0300M was returned to Maranello where it was inspected by factory experts in Ferrari’s Classiche Department and awarded its “White Book” authentication, a specific category by Ferrari Classiche that provides the highest attestation for Ferraris of historical interest, such as those used for race or show purposes. During this process, Ferrari’s Classsiche Department discovered that aside from the major mechanical components previously verified by the Massini Report, the carburetors and ignition system were in fact found to be correct for 0300M. Build sheets indicated the car left the works fitted with a trio of Weber 36 IF4C carburetors, but notations were found that show the car was returned to the factory very soon after delivery to be fitted with improved 36DCF/3s as specified by Mr. Herzet; which it still wears to this day. At the same time, the S55A distributor was upgraded to an S55B-spec unit for racing purposes. This level of originality is unusual for any 64 year old automobile, but is truly remarkable for a car that has endured the type of competition use that 0300M has. Beyond its staggering race history, 0300M is one of just three known cars - and the only Ferrari - to have been bodied by Martial Oblin. It presents today in beautiful concours condition, fresh from the lawn at Pebble Beach and supplied with a full array of documentation, copies of period photographs and race history. The recent Classiche Certification has further confirmed and solidified its incredibly authentic presentation, and items such as the tool roll, quick-lift jack, and even a wooden tool box with service tools are included in the sale. The sale of this stunning and hugely important Ferrari 166 MM represents a very rare opportunity to acquire a genuine, early competition Ferrari with iron-clad provenance supported by the top names in the business, up to and including the Ferrari factory. History, provenance and style aside, 166 MM/53 0300M is a truly fabulous automobile to drive. The jewel-like 2-liter V12 engine is in top condition, having been sorted by the best experts in the world. With the ultra-light alloy coachwork by Oblin, and that potent engine, it returns exceptional performance. We can easily see how Jacques Herzet was smitten by his very special Ferrari from the first drive – and how he managed to achieve such incredible accomplishments in it as a privateer. 0300M remains eligible for virtually any event on the concours circuit, and with fabulous performance and easy road manners, it is the machine of choice for rallies and events including the Mille Miglia Storica. This is a remarkable opportunity to acquire one of the best examples of a most important model in Ferrari’s history, one just 46 cars built, and one that carries with it a truly incredible history.   Competition History: 53 - Jacques Herzet, Brussels, B 53/may/17 2nd OA Coupe de Spa Jacques Herzet #23 53/jul/10 3rd OA 1st IC Rallye International des Alpes Jacques Herzet / Lucien Bianchi #404 53/aug/23 1st IC 3rd OA Liege - Rome - Liege Jacques Herzet / Lucien Bianchi #68 53/sep/05-13 7th OA 2nd S2.0 Tour de France Jacques Herzet / Lucien Bianchi #22 53/oct/18 7th OA Rally de Lisboa Jacques Herzet 53/dec/13 5th GP Rio de Janeiro Jacques Herzet 53/dec/27 10th GP de Sao Paolo Johnny Claes 54/jan/04 dnf IV. GP do Cidade de Rio de Janeiro, Circuito da Gavea Jacques Herzet / Johnny Claes 54/jan/11 10th GP de Sao Paolo, Interlagos Johnny Claes 54 - rebodied as Spyder by Oblin, B 54/may/23 6th S2.0 GP des Voitures de Série, GP de Spa Jacques Herzet #12 54/jun/06 4th GP des Frontieres, Chimay Jacques Herzet #.. 54/jul/03-04 17th OA 6th S2.0 12h Reims Jacques Herzet / Johnny Claes #34 54/aug/19-23 dnf Liege - Rome - Liege Jacques Herzet / Lucien Bianchi #103 54/sep/03-12 dnf Tour de France Jacques Herzet / Lucien Bianchi #126 54/oct/23 11th OA GP Penya Rhin, Barcelona Johnny Claes #24 55/mar/27 2nd IC KM Lance de Waterloo Jacques Herzet 55/apr/03 1st IC Campione SAR Jacques Herzet #119 55/apr - displayed at Salon Brussels 55/may/08 9th OA 2nd S2.6 GP des Voitures de Série Tourisme et Sport, Spa Jacques Herzet #19 55/may/29 4th OA 2nd S2.0 GP des Frontieres, Chimay Jacques Herzet #40 56/apr/08 4th 12h de Huy Jacques Herzet #17 56/may/13 3rd S2.0 GP des Voitures de Série, Spa Jacques Herzet #12 56/may/20 10th OA 5th S2.0 GP des Frontieres, Chimay Jacques Herzet #44 56/jun/30 dns 12h Reims Jacques Herzet / Lucien Bianchi #15 56/sep/30 4th IC Cote de Namur Jacques Herzet #34 56/oct/03 4th Cote de Namur Jacques Herzet #110 57/mar 5th IC Cote de Bomerée Jacques Herzet

    Last update: 19 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1912 Overland Model 61 Touring

    $89,500(£66,319.50)

    The Overland Auto Company was born of the Standard Wheel Company of Terre Haute, Indiana in the early 20th century. Standard Wheel had long been a supplier to a number of carriage and wagon builders, and in 1903 decided to have a go at engineering their own motor car. A young engineer named Claude Cox was sent around the country to see how others were building their cars. Upon his return, he set to work designing a 2-seat runabout of his own. He took a slightly different approach from the likes of Oldsmobile, Cadillac and other light cars who had their engines mounted under the floor. Cox put his 5-hp vertical single under the bonnet in what is now the conventional layout. Cars began to trickle out of Standard Wheel Company works, but with limited space, operations were moved to Indianapolis. Buggy builder David M. Parry invested heavily in the project, taking over from Standard Wheel Company and incorporating the firm as Overland Auto Company in 1905. An Elmira, New York based dealer by the name of John North Willys was suitably impressed with the 1907 models to place a $10,000 deposit on 500 cars. When no cars arrived, he went to Indianapolis only to find Parry completely bankrupt with no factory and a handful of leftover parts. But Willys believed in the car enough to take over the entire operation, and finally, Overland had found stability. By 1908, 465 cars were produced… in a temporary circus tent! Willys purchased a former Pope-Toledo factory in Toledo, Ohio where the company would remain for the rest of its existence. The model range was expanded to four models on two different wheelbases. Overland cars gained a reputation for their outstanding quality, and despite Claude Cox leaving the firm, Overland had earned a second place standing in sales behind Ford; a position they would hold from 1912 until 1919. The Overland featured here is a lovely 1912 Model 61T Touring. The Model 61 was Overland’s flagship model and the largest Brass-Era Overland up to that time, powered by a 270 cubic inch 45 horsepower L-head four cylinder.  This is one of just seven examples known to survive and it has lovingly cared for and thoughtfully upgraded for safe and reliable touring. First restored in the 1960s, it was acquired by the well-known Brass Era enthusiasts Wendell “Ohlly” and Marilyn Ohlendorf, who had seen and admired it on a Glidden Tour. It was then sold in 1979 to Don and Nancy Sonicsen of Illinois, who continued to enjoy the Overland on tours for the next 25 years. Purchased from Mrs. Sonicsen in 2008, it was subsequently treated to some restoration work and mechanical freshening, continuing to provide thousands of miles of enjoyment. The Overland received a high quality re-paint by John Sanders of Antique Autos of Rockford, Illinois. The handsome gray and dark red combo suits the car wonderfully, and the quality is excellent. Red highlights around the door openings, gold coachlines and two-tone red and gray wheels add a delightful charm. The bodywork is in excellent order, and the extensive brass brightwork is glossy and attractive, having been polished and coated by Rick Britten. The headlamps, made by Castle Lamp Company of Elmira, New York, feature unusual blue-colored lenses and are possibly a nod to John North Willys’ home town. The body also features interesting built-in toolboxes on the running boards as well as dual rear-mounted spares, brass cowl lamps and the proud Overland script emblem on the radiator. The interior is trimmed in black button-tufted leather as is period correct. The upholstery presents in good condition, showing some patina, and is most likely from the first restoration in the 1960s. Regardless, it has been very nicely preserved and offers a warm, period charm that is still in keeping with the rest of the cosmetics. A large canvas top provides a degree of protection from the elements, while a leather top boot keeps things tidy during open air motoring. Brass Stewart speedo and a brass clock adorn the polished wood dash panel. This Overland truly shines on the road. It has been lovingly cared-for mechanically, having received a full engine rebuild by longtime VMCCA and HCCA member Keith Kruse of Fort Wayne, Indiana. A new clutch from Bob Knaak of California was installed, and the rear differential rebuilt, along with remanufacturing both axle shafts. An overdrive has been added to the transmission, the car now cruises nicely at 50 mph with four passengers aboard. Sensible upgrades such as a 12V electric starter, alternator, and upgraded ignition with Henschel twin-spark distributor have been carefully incorporated to allow for easy and reliable touring. The tires are relatively fresh and the twin spares have yet to be used. This charming, rare and attractive Overland 61T is one of the finest of its kind from this important early American marque, and thanks to the care of its enthusiastic keepers, it remains a proven and fine choice for HCCA, AACA and VMCCA touring or for simple enjoyment with family and friends.  

    Last update: 15 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1911 Mercer 35C Raceabout

    $1,650,000(£1,222,650)

    Roebling-Planche of Trenton, New Jersey made just a handful of cars in 1909, and if the Roebling family hadn’t persisted in their desire to build motorcars, the company would have faded into obscurity like so many other flash-in-the-pan manufacturers of the time. The Roeblings had made their fortune from major civil engineering projects, most notably the building of the Brooklyn Bridge. Following the fizzle of Roebling-Planche, the company was renamed “MERCER” after the county to which their Trenton, New Jersey works was relocated. The earliest Mercers had proprietary engines by Beaver, until the arrival of Finlay Robertson Porter; the man responsible for establishing Mercer’s path to fame. Porter’s magic laid in his 300 cubic inch (4,916 cubic centimeter) T-Head four-cylinder engine design. The new engine was fitted to various models such as a Tourer, Light Tonneau and a Runabout, but it was the light and sporty Raceabout model where Porter’s engine shined brightest. The latter was a thoroughly unique car with a lightened frame and bodywork stripped down to its barest essentials. Driver protection was limited to an optional monocle windscreen, though goggles would have likely been more effective. A unique chassis was a half-inch shorter in height than standard to save weight and bodywork was minimalist yet stylish and racy. With Porter’s new engine, the Mercer Raceabout it struck the perfect balance between lightness and strength, with the 300 cubic inch four-cylinder making prodigious horsepower and torque, propelling the Raceabout to a top speed of 75-plus MPH, yet remaining light enough over the axle to allow balanced road holding. It can be easily argued that the Mercer Raceabout was America’s first proper sports car. While there were certainly bigger and more powerful machines available, the Mercer stood alone in its exquisite handling, surprisingly light steering and easy, slick-shifting four-speed gearbox. In 1911, when the model was still quite new, a pair of Mercer Raceabouts participated in the inaugural Indianapolis 500 Mile Race. The cars were driven to the track with fenders and lights in place, where they were then stripped down, raced for 500 trouble-free miles (lore says the bonnets were never opened during the event!), then fenders and lamps reattached and the cars driven home. It was no doubt a tremendous showing for Mercer and a move that fully cemented the marque’s reputation as a world-class sporting car manufacturer. This outstanding 1911 Model 35C Raceabout is a very correct and well-restored example. It is one of just two known Raceabouts fitted with distinct Rudge knock-off wire wheels and it is both beautifully presented for show and extremely well-sorted for road use. The known history of this Raceabout goes back to O.C. Corriher, a textile magnate from Landis, North Carolina. Mr. Corriher was a well-known collector who enjoyed large early motorcars from Pierce, Rolls-Royce, Simplex, Mercer and Thomas. Like most racing cars of the period, few Mercer Raceabouts survived in their “as built” state, since they were often used hard, crashed, or valuable parts were scavenged to build specials. The car was assembled after Mr. Corriher spent many years acquiring period parts during the 1950’s, many of which are believed to be genuine original Raceabout components. Mr. Corriher restored the car, and painted the car in a correct shade of light gray and kept it as a centerpiece in his collection until his passing in the 1990s. From there the car passed to its most recent owners who enjoyed it as Mr. Corriher had before embarking on a comprehensive, high-quality restoration which it wears today. The car rides on a 4-inch chassis (Runabouts and Tourers used a 4-1/2” tall chassis) and correct original type Rudge wheels. The engine is from a Tourer, and is fitted along with a correct Fletcher carburetor and twin-spark Robert Bosch magneto, and during the recent restoration a full rebuild, including new 7:1 compression flat-top cylinders and pistons were fitted to bring the car to full Raceabout specification. Other items such as the polished Presto-lite tank, 100-mph Jones speedometer, and the fabulous Rushmore search light are all correct Raceabout details. The restoration was completed in 2008 and the car remains in beautiful condition, having seen only light use and having mellowed slightly since completion. It was awarded with an AACA National First Prize that same year, as well as being the recipient of the AACA Cup for the Most Outstanding Pre-1922 Car for the Eastern Region. It presents in a striking, period correct yellow and black livery, a color combo made famous by the racing Mercers. The body is in excellent order with high quality paintwork and detailing. Extensive brass is in finely presented, including the original radiator shell, aforementioned search lamp, as well as dual carriage lamps and tail lamp. The wooden dash panel is highly polished and adorned with correct instrumentation while the twin bucket seats are covered in black leather as original. The car is pictured wearing two-eared knock-offs on the yellow Rudge wheels, which are in place for ease of service, however the correct original hex-shaped knock-offs are also included in the sale. The engine is fully detailed with correct brass, copper and enamel finishes and fittings, and it a beautiful thing to behold. The rebuilt engine is strong and runs exceptionally well. We have experienced 50+ mph runs in this car, marveling at the handling and performance that belies its 106 years. The gearbox is remarkably slick for such a robust unit and the steering surprisingly light once at speed. The brakes pull the car up reliably and squarely, with no wandering or drama. This Mercer Model 35C Raceabout truly is a magnificent machine to drive while presenting in exceptionally clean, highly correct condition. It remains very-much in showable condition, beautiful in its brutal simplicity. Yet it is from the driver’s seat, tucked behind the monocle windscreen and savoring the seemingly endless torque and exhaust bellow from Finlay Porter’s brilliant engine and the sublime balance of the chassis where this car is best enjoyed.

    Last update: 19 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1947 MG TC Roadster

    $46,500(£34,456.50)

    The MG TC was the third in the “Midget” series of four-cylinder sports cars that first debuted in 1936, replacing the PB. The TA was powered by an uprated version of the Wolseley 10 OHV four-cylinder engine, and the styling was slightly revised, retaining the lovely sweeping fenders and elegantly simple body. With the introduction of the TB in 1939, the Wolseley engine was dropped in favor of the more modern XPAG engine as fitted to the Morris Ten. As before, MG massaged the engine and fitted dual SU carburetors to produce a respectable 54 horsepower. A mere 379 were produced before the outbreak of war halted production. MG’s first post-war model, the TC, was launched in 1945. Outwardly similar to the TB, the TC had a slightly wider body for additional comfort and the XPAG engine got a slight bump in compression and horsepower. The big news however, was the introduction of the TC to American shores. Returning US Servicemen had been bitten by the sports car bug while serving in Europe and a great many of them brought home sports cars, soon organizing racing circuits on open roads or setting up temporary circuits on air fields. Cars from MG, Allard, Jaguar and Austin-Healey formed the foundation of American sports car racing in the era. The TC, while built in right-hand-drive only, proved popular enough with sportycar enthusiasts to cement MG’s place in the critical American market, which would serve as the marque’s largest consumer for the next three and a half decades. The TC may not have been big on power, but it was simple, robust and it drove like nothing Americans had experienced on our shores before. This little car with its pre-war styling had the huge character, defined by the torquey XPAG engine, short throws on the four-speed gearbox and the fabulously direct steering. Simple suspension on tall, skinny wheels was far from sophisticated, but given the TC’s light weight, it made for predictable and enjoyable handling. Best of all, it was inexpensive. The TC was the gateway drug for a great many racers who then moved on to bigger and faster things. If a driver could be fast in a TC, he or she could be fast in just about anything. This marvelous MG TC is believed to have originally been imported to California, and has been modified with a number of rare period-correct accessories that would have been utilized in the early 1950s by a budding sports car enthusiast to eek a little more performance out of their newly acquired TC. It is presented in lovely navy-blue paintwork, along with blue leather and blue canvas upholstery on the top and tonneau. The excellent body has been modified with cycle fenders up front to shed weight, retaining the pretty original rear wings. The bonnet sides have been removed to improve cooling – a typical modification for the period – and a single driving lamp is mounted up front. The factory folding windscreen is supplemented by a pair of period Brooklands Aeroscreens. The original, spindly 19-inch wire wheels are fitted; finished in silver-gray paint as correct and a dual, rear-mounted spare wheel setup further enhances the purposeful look. The overall quality is excellent, and while the restoration has a few years on it, the car has been very well-maintained as part of a larger collection, remaining in excellent condition and beautifully presented. Attractive blue leather trim complements the blue bodywork, and the original dash panel has been replaced with an engine turned panel for a bit more of a sporty appeal. A correct style  in tan steering wheel gives a sporty, purposeful appearance. The cockpit presents in very fine condition, showing minimal wear. The canvas top and tonneau cover are both in good order, allowing for some moderate protection from the elements. The go-fast goodies are not limited to a few cosmetics modifications. The 1250 cc OHV four cylinder is uprated with a Judson supercharger, providing a welcome boost over the original 55 horsepower. Most notable, however, is the useful additional torque provided by the blower. This little TC runs very well and thanks to that extra torque, returns lively performance and a tuneful soundtrack from the sports exhaust. Keeping all of that additional speed in check is a set of very rare period finned alloy brake drums. A rare period speed part, few of these survived as they were popular among racers who would have run them quite hard in competition. This delightful MG TC harkens back to the days of intrepid racers driving their cars to places like Watkins Glen, Bryfan Tyddyn and Pebble Beach, battling for glory and (hopefully) driving back home at the end of a weekend. It is a beautifully presented car that is an absolute blast to drive. Few cars can capture the pure essence of motoring like the MG TC, and this example, thanks to the many fine period enhancements, has been made even more enjoyable to carve up your favorite back roads.

    Last update: 15 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1929 Ford Model A Roadster Pick Up

    $24,500(£18,154.50)

    The Ford Model A needs little in the way of an opening introduction. Ford had enormous shoes to fill when it came time to replace the Model T, and by the end of the T’s 18 year run, Ford’s dominance was fading. A new car was desperately needed, and while consumers and dealers demanded ever more features, Henry’s staunch pragmatism and disdain for frivolous styling slowed progress. Henry Ford eventually conceded, largely due to the influence of his market-savvy son Edsel, and the stylish and feature-filled Model A was born. The Model A debuted in 1927, featuring an L-head four-cylinder engine of 201 cubic inches, mated to a conventional sliding fork transmission, which finally put the complex and archaic planetary unit in the T to rest. Also new was a conventional three-pedal arrangement, an on-board electric starter, four wheel brakes, and a full line of new open and closed body styles. Henry had to adapt his assembly lines for flexible mass production, allowing him to build any number of body styles at the same time, yet retain the sheer volume he mastered during the time of the T. Despite getting a late start in the face of competition from the likes of Chevrolet, the Ford Model A proved to be yet another smash hit for Ford – selling over a million units by its second year in production, and going on to sell over 4.8 million examples of all body styles by the time production ended in early 1932 when the V8 powered Model 18 and improved 4-cylinder Model B took over. The Model A has gone on to become the backbone of the classic car hobby. Given the ubiquitous nature and mechanical simplicity, they are the ideal choice for an enthusiast seeking their first foray into the world of antique automobiles. Plentiful parts and a vibrant, enthusiastic community of owners also allows for even the most novice owner to enjoy a Model A to the fullest. Edsel Ford’s restrained yet classic styling lends the Model A with a sense of classlessness… something only a handful of cars (Mini, Mustang, Beetle) have managed to achieve. Even the most serious collectors make room for a Ford Model A, such is their significance, as well as the pure and simple joys they provide from behind the wheel. This 1929 Model A wears the rare and desirable Roadster Pickup body style. This delightfully patinated example struck us with its honest, hard-working character. Almost as important as the truck itself, it comes to us with a 10-page, hand written letter from a Mr. Tom Umholtz of Pennsylvania, who purchased the truck in 1965, detailing when he first saw it, how he came to own it, and his own work in tracking down its history. It is a wonderful story that makes this truck all the more endearing (including a tale of it being rolled on its side once!). He originally bought the truck in 1965 after seeing it at a local auction in Pennsylvania, as he was currently employed as a carpenter, his boss said he needed a truck, so Tom bought the A for $375. Apparently, his boss was less than pleased when he showed up in a battle-worn Model A with no top! But the truck was fundamentally sound, and through many years of careful ownership and regular use, he nursed it back to top mechanical condition, all along making improvements to the cosmetics as he could. Since his time with it, the “RPU” (Roadster Pick-Up) has been preserved with all of its visual history intact. The body is finished in dark Brewster Green (resprayed in the late 1960s for a whopping $25), while fenders and the pickup bed are black. The paint is care worn and work worn, and while the body shows a few battle scars here and there, it is solid, sound and correct Ford sheetmetal and it is fabulously endearing. The soft top is in very good condition, and the frame works as it should. Brightwork on the Model A is limited to the stainless steel radiator shell and bumpers, all of which appear in good order, fundamentally sound but in keeping with the rest of the care-worn character of this truck. Black wire wheels are shod with blackwall tires all in good order and the bed is fitted with a cherry wood plank floor that Mr. Umholtz installed in the 1960s. The bed rails are believed to be original. The overall appearance is that of a truck that has been worked hard, yet also cared for like a cherished old tool – something that has a job to do, and has been maintained so it can do it reliably. The cab is simple and workmanlike, again with barrels of character and a sense of living history that is often lost on perfectly restored examples. As with any Model A, controls are simple and it is built to last. While the cosmetics of this particular truck set the stage, it is the way it drives that completes the story. Like a trusty old tool, it starts and runs with reliable precision. The 201 cubic inch four-cylinder engine emits its signature burble and provides ample torque for easy driving. Short shift the non-synchronized 3-speed manual transmission (which is easily mastered and one of the simple pleasures of the Model A) and simply let the torque do its job. Four wheel mechanical brakes pull up strong and square with little drama. This Ford Model A has a wonderful history that it wears proudly on its sleeve. It would make a fine choice for a first-time classic buyer, as well as an established collector who simply loves an iconic car with a great story. Honest, charming, and in wonderful mechanical order, this Model A Roadster Pick Up will hopefully continue to feature in many more delightful stories for years to come.

    Last update: 21 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1963 Studebaker Avanti

    $86,500(£64,096.50)

    It was no secret that in the early 1960s, Studebaker was up against the ropes. Their financial troubles had started years earlier and the failed merger with Packard had left them reeling. Selling economy cars was fine, but what they really needed was a stylish “halo” model to drive traffic into the showrooms. New company president Sherwood Egbert had the idea for a sporty “personal car” to compete against the likes of the Chevrolet Corvette and Ford Thunderbird, a car that could boost their rather staid and conservative product line. He doodled out his idea for a four-seat personal car while on a flight from South Bend to California. Upon meeting with his design team, led by Raymond Loewy, he charged them with the task of creating an image-booster for Studebaker and gave them a virtually impossible time line with which to do it in. After just 8 days of feverish work, Loewy and his team of designers (Tom Kellogg, John Ebstein and Bob Andrews) produced a two-sided clay model, one side featuring a four-seat design, the other a two seater. Company brass settled on the four-seater and the styling team went back to further hone their work. To power their new creation, named Avanti, engineers used the 289 cubic inch V8 and reinforced chassis from the Lark Daytona convertible. While not ground breaking, it was an affordable and reliable platform for Studebaker to work with. But the underpinnings played 2nd fiddle to what sat atop – the body by Loewy and his team was jaw dropping. Fiberglass construction allowed them to accurately reproduce the coke-bottle curves and fine detail as penned by the artists. The smooth, grille-less design was groundbreaking, the first to use a “bottom feeder” radiator and intake. It was clean, yet finely detailed and sophisticated. Egbert had ambitiously predicted Avanti sales of 10,000 units in the first year, but thanks to production issues and concerns from buyers about Studebaker’s health as a company, a fractional 1,200 were sold for the 1962 model year, with fewer than 4,600 units sold the following year. Studebaker ceased operations by 1963, yet in spite of the drama surrounding its gestation and ultimate demise, the Avanti remains a truly iconic automobile and a brilliant piece of American industrial design history. This exquisite 1963 Studebaker Avanti R1 comes to us from the hands of a noted Studebaker collector and enthusiast. He has owned several different Avantis over the years, and of all the cars he’s owned, this is most certainly the finest. It was comprehensively and expertly restored to the exact build-sheet specifications and presents in beautiful, fresh condition. An early production car, this Avanti (S/N R1259) was built on July 11th 1962 and delivered new to a dentist in Boise Idaho. After enjoying his Avanti for a few years, the car was sold to a Mr. Hutchison in Littleton, Colorado in 1967. Mr. Hutchison drove the car through 1977 at which time he replaced it with a new car, but kept the Avanti in storage until his passing in 2013. From there, the car found its way to its current owner, who upon assessing it as an original R1 specification car with an automatic transmission and factory air conditioning, determined it was very much worth restoring. He soon embarked on a comprehensive restoration that saw the car fully stripped down and restored to exacting specifications. It still appears very fresh, with exceptional PPG Avanti White paint. Particularly difficult with a fiberglass car, the body exhibits crisp feature lines, outstanding panel fit and beautiful, deep reflections in the surfaces. The razor’s edge bumpers are similarly presented, with concours quality plating and correct rubber protectors. NOS and original trim was painstakingly polished and fitted to ensure precise fit. It rides on original wheels with those fabulous signature Avanti convex wheel covers and correct tires. Like the body, the interior has been restored to exacting standards using some of the last remaining original bolts of fabric made by Uniroyal specifically for Studebaker. Likewise, the Hidem welting was sourced directly from the old Mishawaka, Indiana plant. As per the original build sheets, it is trimmed in Avanti Red and Fawn with correct door panels and “salt and pepper” carpets in correct material. The dash is finished in off white with fully restored instruments that appear factory fresh. Original A/C controls and console shifter are excellent and as they left the factory. The impeccable detailing continues under the hood with a beautifully presented 289 cubic inch V8 in normally aspirated R1 specification. Correct finishes and paints adorn the engine and accessories for a factory-fresh appearance. Incredibly, some of the original A/C hoses were found to be in excellent condition and still had factory markings. During the restoration, special attention was given to the cooling to ensure this Avanti runs cool and strong. The chassis was stripped, prepped and painted, while every removable frame component was stripped and powder coated. It is quite simply one of the finest, most meticulously restored Avantis we have encountered. It is so accurate in fact, that photos of this car are included in the latest update to the AOA Authenticity Manual. From the beautiful and crisp body to the expertly researched and detailed drivetrain, this is a show-worthy example that has been lavished upon by a dedicated enthusiast. For anyone seeking an example of the Raymond Loewy design icon to show and enjoy, this is certainly one of the best Avanti R1s available today.  

    Last update: 23 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1922 Duesenberg Model A Phaeton

    $395,000(£292,695)

    Brothers Fred and August Duesenberg are undoubtedly two of the most influential personalities in the evolution of the automobile. Their engineering prowess can be compared with the likes of Harry Miller, Ettore Bugatti and Ferdinand Porsche among others, and the machines that bear their name continue to be among the most desirable and valuable American automobiles ever produced. Of course, most casual enthusiasts immediately think of the J and SJ series of the early 1930s when the Duesenberg name is mentioned. After all, the J was a great among greats, the fastest and most powerful American automobile, producing 265 horsepower (320 in supercharged form) at a time when other luxury cars could hardly top 150 horsepower. The SJ and its short-wheelbase version could be considered the first Supercar. But before the Model J, and before E.L. Cord’s takeover of the firm, there was the Straight Eight, commonly known as Model A: Fred and August’s very first serial production model. The Duesenberg Model A (officially marketed as the “Straight Eight”) was a very fine automobile that was saddled by lackluster business decisions by the company’s bosses. The Duesenberg brothers recognized they were better engineers than businessmen, and set to work in establishing a new company structure that handed the business dealings over to Newton Van Zandt and Luther M. Rankin. The new owners established a new factory in Indianapolis and work began on designing a new production car. A prototype was shown early in 1920, however following a last-minute redesign of the engine (Fred decided an overhead cam should replace the original side-rocker arm arrangement) the initial buzz surrounding the car had faded, hampering sales. Much of the company’s money had been spent on the factory, leaving little left over for actual production. Projections were for 2,400 cars per year, but that quickly became a pipe-dream when actual production was more like 1 car per day. But Duesenberg soon found their footing and sales of the Model A gradually gained momentum. The car itself was a true standout. It was the very first serial production car in America to feature an inline-eight cylinder engine – dubbed “Eight-in-a-Row” in period advertising. The engine drew heavily from Duesenberg’s racing experience, displacing 260 cubic inches (about 4.3 liters) and featuring an overhead camshaft, crossflow combustion chambers, detachable head, and a healthy 88 horsepower output. The chassis was a conventional ladder frame with well-tuned suspension and four-wheel hydraulic brakes; the first production car to feature them. Brake drums were of finned alloy to aid in cooling, another lesson learned on the race track. Ultimately, history was not on the side of the Model A, while it is no doubt a brilliant automobile; it seems to have lived in the shadow of its more flamboyant Model J siblings. We are very proud to offer this 1922 Duesenberg Straight Eight Model A; magnificent example of this ground-breaking automobile from one of the greatest names in automotive history. This stunning Duesenberg wears a stylish Sport Phaeton body by Millspaugh & Irish, the Indianapolis-based coachbuilder responsible for most Duesenberg A bodies. As this car was initially discovered, part of the original coachwork had been modified, though it has since been meticulously researched and restored in original specification, executed to the highest standard. The car, which has importantly received an ACD #1 Certification, is presented in a gorgeous tri-tone color scheme with a dove gray main body and dark gray fenders being subtly accented with a deep red chassis and wheels. It is an understated yet breathtaking look that suits the sporty coachwork very well. Body and paint quality is to concours levels with outstanding fit and finish. Detailing is understated, with the beautifully polished nickel radiator flanked by drum headlamps as correct, and topped with a winged Duesenberg-branded Moto-Meter. Dual side mounts feature upholstered covers and very cool period mirrors. Dual cowl lamps are affixed to the windscreen frame and a painted metal trunk sits out back. Bumpers and other bright trim are finished to a very high standard in keeping with the rest of the body. The cabin is trimmed in black leather which presents in beautiful, fresh condition showing little to no signs of use since the restoration. Door panels feature pockets with embossed flaps and the rear of the front seat is equipped with built-in wooden cabinets, presumably for storing a lap blanket for crisp morning drives. The Dash is finished in black lacquer as correct and a Duesenberg 8-branded Warner De Luxe instrument cluster sits front and center. The beautiful wooden steering wheel has been restored with a furniture grade finish. The folding top is trimmed in black canvas and remains taut, with a full set of side curtains included. Of course, the highlight of any Duesenberg is the engine, and this exquisite example does not disappoint. The overhead-cam straight eight is beautifully presented against the polished alloy firewall as original. The engine is painted in a light dove-gray, which is correct for these early Duesenbergs, as only the later cars got the signature bright green treatment. The cam cover is polished alloy, the wiring loom gorgeous nickel plated steel, and the ancillaries are all finished to concours quality standards, including the Robert Bosch horn on the firewall. The engine is impeccably presented, a gorgeous piece of engineering that also delivers excellent performance out on the road. Shown at Pebble Beach in 2010 where it also participated in the Pebble Beach Tour, this fine Duesenberg Model A has also received its ACD club Certification, as well as an ACD Club National award and an AACA Junior award in 2011. Rarely do early Duesenbergs such as this appear on the open market, and this is a fine opportunity to acquire a fabulously restored example wearing beautiful coachwork. It remains very fresh and is ready to continue its show successes, and will surely provide a rewarding experience on the road, thanks to the astounding performance from the highly advanced eight-cylinder engine and impeccable restoration.

    Last update: 9 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1927 Cadillac Series 314 Double Cowl Sport Phaeton

    $195,000(£144,495)

    Cadillac had long established its reputation as a leader for innovation and quality in the luxury car market by the 1920s. The long-running and fierce battle with Packard for sales supremacy meant Cadillac engineers were constantly striving for new ideas to refine and enhance their vehicles. As the decade drew to a close, Cadillac was highly motivated to retake their standing at the top of the sales charts from their cross-town rivals. The introduction of the junior LaSalle brand in 1927 helped greatly in their quest, and was intended to complement the senior models, which in 1927 consisted of the Model 314 V8 series. A dizzying array of body styles were offered, from the standard Cadillac bodies, to the Custom lines from both Fisher and Fleetwood. We are very pleased to offer this truly stunning 1927 Model 314 wearing a Double Cowl Sport Phaeton body from the Fisher Body Custom line.  It is presented in magnificent colors; the all-black body and fenders accented with a simple but bold red inlay and subtle cream-colored coach lines. The combination is breathtaking, and the quality of the restoration equally impressive. This highly desirable and stylish 314 was treated to a comprehensive, concours-quality restoration and has seen only light use since completion. It has been shown and obsessively well cared-for, remaining in impeccable condition. The black paint is beautifully applied over laser straight panels, and the extensive brightwork and detailing are in beautiful condition. It is fitted with drum headlights, very rare dual, drum-style Pilot-ray spot lamps, drum cowl lamps, Cadillac mirrors mounted on dual-sidemount spares, and the first known Cadillac radiator mascot – a herald in Cadillac regalia, proudly trumpeting the praises of the marque. In the rear is found a painted trunk rack with a fantastic period trunk and black canvas cover. This is an extremely handsome body that looks elegant with the top up or down, though we are particularly fond of the sporting attitude it takes on with the top down and both windscreens folded flat. Occupants are treated to a gorgeous red interior that matches the red flash on the bodywork. Gray carpeting bound in red provides a bit of subtle contrast. The leather upholstery is simply exquisite, showing little signs of use and virtually no creasing. There is a beautifully finished wood-rimmed steering wheel perched atop a chromed steering column, and complemented by a matching wood gear knob. The highlight of the interior, however has to be the instrument panel; a stunningly ornate affair with a wood fascia surrounded by gorgeous gold inlay. The instruments themselves are fully restored, and the Cadillac crest is proudly inlaid in gold. Rear passengers are treated to their own cowl and windscreen for comfort and weather protection, as well as courtesy lights and a storage compartment built into the rear of the front seat. The engine, drivetrain and chassis are all detailed to concours standards, the quality of the restoration backed by a CCCA Senior Award badge earned in 2005. This fabulous Cadillac has been the proud showpiece of a dedicated marque enthusiast who has bestowed upon it years of care. We love the Harley Earl styling the breathtaking Fleetwood detailing, and would proudly use this handsome, desirable and rare Cadillac for show or touring. This is a very worthy addition to virtually any collection.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1931 Ford Cragar Sprint Car

    $72,500(£53,722.50)

    The early 1930s formed the foundation for American motorsports. The Great Depression meant that few could afford the exotic machines meant for the grand prix circuits of the world, and yet motorsport still provided an opportunity for a few lucky drivers to earn some decent pocket money from week to week. Dirt horse tracks on local fairgrounds were used by racers in Ford Model T and Model A specials, sliding around on the throttle and kicking up dirt into the faces of a delighted crowd. It was cheap entertainment for the spectators, and racers had boundless opportunities to race around the country, particularly in places like Pennsylvania and the Midwest. The cars, meanwhile, were built with great creativity. Speed parts were few and far between so while a few key components could be purchased, it was down to the skill of the car builder to adapt them to whatever base machine they were using- and that was usually a cheap and ubiquitous Ford. Companies like Frontenac and Cragar offered overhead valve conversions to allow the somewhat agricultural but robust Ford four cylinder engines to breathe more deeply and rev freely. Rear axles were welded up to eliminate the differential effect and promote big power slides, while the gearboxes were even stripped of first and reverse gears to save weight. Standard bodies were ditched in favor of single-seat arrangements, sometimes purchased from a catalog, sometimes home built, depending on how deep the builder’s pockets were. These cars were the origin of the great American Midget Racers, Sprint Cars and Indy Roadsters that came to define American motorsport from the 1930s through the glory days of 1960s and through to today’s World of Outlaws and Silver Crown sprint cars. Our featured 1931 Ford “Cragar Special” gets its name from the Cragar overhead valve conversion it wears. Along with the “Fronty”, the Cragar OHV was a favored setup by many racers in the period, and as a result, a number of cars from this era carry the same nickname. This particular car has a wonderful history, passing through the hands of the father of the collector car business, Milford H. “Tiny” Gould. Tiny Gould had a successful tire recapping business, and he always had an affinity for old cars… the whole idea of “collector” cars hadn’t really become fully developed yet. Hailing from Pennsylvania, Gould raced at events such as the Giant’s Despair Hillclimb in Wilkes-Barre or on the quarter-mile asphalt oval at Bone Stadium. He soon began collecting classic cars from the 1920s and 1930s, constantly horse-trading with his friends and fellow Antique Automobile Club of America members, eventually opening “Tiny Gould Antique and Classic Cars”. He, along with the likes of Leo Gephart, formed the foundation of the collector car hobby’s transition into a legitimate business. Along with the big classics such as Duesenberg, Packard and Stutz, Gould was a champion for early American dirt race cars, so much so that he was instrumental in creating the racing car class within the AACA ranks. Along with very exotic machinery such as the 1935 Miller-Ford, he owned a number of dirt-track specials such as our featured Cragar Special, recognizing their importance from early on. During his time with this car, it earned its AACA Junior and Senior awards. Today, the Cragar Special presents in wonderful condition. The distinctive blue paint and hand-lettered graphics give it a beautiful period look and the quality of the paint and finishing is excellent. The silver frame, red wheels and red leather seat upholstery contrast nicely, ensuring she is a stand out on track. A few minor nicks and flaws are found, but overall it is a great looking piece with an abundance of charm. The car is loaded with wonderful details, from the louvered front apron, leather hood belts, manual fuel pump, and Andre Hartford friction shocks, to the exposed Model A transmission, knobby Wards Riverside Power Grip rear tires, and military surplus seat belt. The red leather seat cushion snaps into place for easy removal during service and it remains in very good condition, showing only light age. The Ford Model A engine is classically basic and tidy. The period Cragar Overhead Valve conversion remains intact and looks great with the polished alloy valve cover.  The engines breathes in through a single carburetor, and out through a fabulous four-into-one exhaust that exits through the hood side and runs down the right of the car into a chrome exhaust pipe. An engine-turned alloy firewall adds a bit of racy appeal to the engine bay. The engine runs well, though the car may need some minor fettling prior to any track duty. Brakes are rear only, activated by an outside lever – a correct arrangement allowing drivers to invoke a throttle-steer slide with a quick yank of the lever. While this car’s racing history is unknown, it is regardless an important and very collectible car, thanks to its history and success in AACA events during its time with Mr. Tiny Gould. The vintage dirt car, Sprint Car and Indy Car community is an active and enthusiastic group, and they would no doubt welcome this delightful little machine into their ranks. We would love to see it in action, kicking up a rooster tail of dirt as it slides around an oval, with the distinct burble from that gutsy little Ford engine.  

    Last update: 19 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1987 Mercedes-Benz 560SL Convertible

    $51,500(£38,161.50)

    Following the commercial success of the R113-series 230, 250 and 280SL, Mercedes-Benz realized they had a tough act to follow with its replacement. The R113 SL models were responsible for perfecting Mercedes’ formula for their ideal sports roadster. The 300SL was a technological marvel, but costly to build, buy and maintain. The 190SL utilized humble passenger car architecture in a pretty body, but was perhaps a bit too pedestrian in terms of performance. The 230SL fixed that with its fuel-injected six cylinder engine and well-honed chassis that borrowed much from other cars in the Mercedes lineup, though with better resolved handling and far better performance. The R113 was continuously improved through the 1971 280SL, the car’s focus being less overtly sporty than its rivals, yet still enormously capable as a comfortable and imminently stylish grand tourer. Mercedes-Benz understood the importance of this new SL roadster, and they threw all they had been studying in the previous decade into the project, with the first examples hitting the road in late 1971. Stuttgart engineers had become obsessed with safety and with the idea of overbuilding their cars. Every surface of the new car, internally known as R107, was carefully honed for maximum safety. Even the signature ribbed tail lights are a result of safety studies, engineers found they stayed cleaner and therefore more visible in poor weather conditions. In spite of the obsession for safety, the R107 wore sophisticated and elegantly styled bodywork with traditional long-bonnet, short-deck proportions. Like other SLs before it, the new car was available with a removable hard top for all-weather enjoyment. Architecture followed the established SL ethos, borrowing from other mid-sized Mercedes cars for suspension and drivetrain, but fine tuning the handling for a more sporting feel. The 107 was produced from 1971-1989; the Mercedes second-longest running model in the marque’s history, and in the process earning its place as an iconic status symbol of the 1980s. Our featured car is the ultimate model of the R107 range, a 560SL from 1987. For this, the final iteration of the series, engineers shoehorned the big 5.6 liter V8 engine and automatic transmission from the 560SEL sedan, creating the fastest and arguably most desirable model of the line. Nearly two decades of development meant the 560SL still felt fresh and benefitted from an impressive equipment list that included ABS brakes, limited slip differential, and a driver’s side airbag. This fine example has covered a genuine 28,395 miles from new and presents in excellent condition throughout. The Signal Red paint (code 5680) is excellent and looks great against the original bright-finish wheels. The body is exceptionally straight, showing no signs of accidents or corrosion, which is backed by a clean Carfax report. It wears its original hardtop and black German canvas soft-top, both in excellent condition. A hard top stand for easy, safe storage will be included in the sale. The chrome bumpers are straight and clean, with the front bumper wearing original Bosch fog lamps. The Anthracite leather interior (code 271) is consistent with the rest of the car, being exceptionally clean and original with excellent seats, door panels and carpets. The dash is crack-free and the wood trim intact and free from cracked lacquer or delamination. Even the delicate wood strips on the fascia are in excellent condition. The interior is completely stock down to the original airbag steering wheel, Becker Grand Prix radio and optional central arm rest. Likewise, the trunk is tidy and clean with factory correct carpeting and panels. Original books, tools and jack are included. The 5.6 liter V8 engine is very nicely detailed, appearing clean and tidy with signs of regular maintenance. The factory finishes on the hardware and ancillaries remain in great condition, indicative of this car’s very low mileage. A stack of records and receipts, as well as the comprehensive Carfax report, show this car received plenty of routine maintenance in the hands of its last owners. This is an excellent example of what is considered to be the most desirable of the R107 series. These rapidly appreciating classics are excellent all-rounders, combining iconic good looks with exceptional reliability, vault-like build quality and surprising performance.  

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1929 Packard 645 Roadster

    $259,500(£192,289.50)

    By the time Packard’s Sixth series had hit dealership floors, Packard was well established as the undisputed king of the American luxury car marketplace. Mechanically, the Sixth series was tried and true Packard. A robust and beautifully engineered chassis featured conventional suspension, powerful four-wheel mechanical brakes and Packard’s proven 384 cubic inch inline eight, delivering 120 horsepower. A 3-speed manual transmission with synchronized gears made for a very easy and pleasurable experience for driver and passenger alike. Packard’s reputation for quality was virtually unsurpassed, and for the sixth series they continued to offer their loyal clients a huge variety of body styles to choose from, from formal and conservative to sporty and sleek. No fewer than twenty-one body styles were available on the top-range Model 645. Of those bodies, eight were standard factory styles while a further thirteen were from the semi-custom catalog. Rollston, LeBaron and Dietrich each offered these semi-custom bodies with Dietrich designs counting among the most sporting styles. Ray Dietrich had worked as a draughtsman for LeBaron before breaking off to form his own firm in 1925. Some believe he was canned after spending too much time dreaming up his new business plan whilst on LeBaron company time. Regardless of the circumstances, Dietrich was a talented designer responsible for many of the finest bodies of the period. His time at the firm that bore his name was short-lived, however; he left in 1930 as the Great Depression took its hold on the custom coachwork industry. Thankfully, his short time was marked with a number of exquisitely designed and constructed automobiles, his work being favored by a great many Packard clients. This 1929 Packard Custom-Eight wears a very attractive and desirable Custom-Catalog roadster body by Dietrich. A top of the line model, it rides on a grand 145.5 inch chassis, which lends the signature long rear deck equipped with a rumble seat. It is one of just 2,061 645s sold, a mere fraction of the 35,000 total Packards produced in 1929, making it among the rarest of the sixth series. This example wears an attractive older restoration that has been well-maintained in good order. Paint quality is good, with a tan main body contrasting chocolate brown fenders, chassis and feature lines, accented with orange coach stripes. Panel fit and alignment is very good, and the paint shiny and attractive, with only a few minor blemishes from use. The restoration appears to have been done to a high standard, the car winning awards at the Meadowbrook Concours d’Elegance in the 1990s. The chrome is in generally good order, though it is beginning to show some slight pitting in places. Accessories include a Goodess of Speed mascot, dual sidemount spares with polished covers, and a golf-bag door. Depress Beam headlamps in chrome are supplemented by a pair of Trippe Light driving lamps, chrome cowl lamps and dual C.M. Hall spot lamps. In 1929, Packards still could be had with wooden spoke or solid disc wheels, however this car wears a set of beautiful chrome wire wheels, an $80.00 option in 1929. The wheels are freshly detailed and shod with new whitewall tires. With its light patina, it still remains a very pretty car, as well as an imposing one on that long, 145.5 inch wheelbase. The sporting cockpit is trimmed in very nice dark tan leather which still presents very well, particularly against the body colors. Dark tan carpet is simple and tidy, and an alloy pyramid-pattern floor board surrounds the shifter and hand brake levers. Being a roadster, it wears a fairly basic convertible top which is in good order, trimmed in brown canvas. A matching top boot and side curtains are included, also in good condition. Behind the big original steering wheel, the instrument panel is correctly finished in woodgrain paint over steel, with original gauges, including the Jaeger clock, in good condition. Door panels are in very good condition, capped with attractive wood trim. Packard’s big 384 cubic inch straight eight is in good condition on this example, with the block and head finished in correct Packard green over a natural finish crankcase. The engine shows a bit of wear from regular use on the finished surfaces, but remains tidy and appears to have been well-serviced. The firewall and accessories all appear in good condition and the Packard body tag and ID numbers are intact and visible. Overall, this is a very attractive yet usable Packard 645 that has benefitted from a good quality restoration and has been well-maintained since. It would make a very fine choice for touring given its condition the performance characteristics of the Sixth Series. With its massive wheelbase and desirable, stylish Dietrich coachwork, this handsome Packard captures the essence of the late-twenties sportsman.

    Last update: 19 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1929 Cadillac 341-B Roadster

    $159,500(£118,189.50)

    At the height of the Classic Era in the late 1920s, Cadillac had been long established as one of America’s most technically creative automobile manufacturers. Since its inception in 1902 (from the remains of The Henry Ford Company, and guided by Henry M. Leland) Cadillac has led the way with American innovation. The electric self-starter, safety glass, electric lamps, the all-steel roof (where previous cars had fabric roof sections), the synchromesh transmission, the dual-plane crankshaft V8 and even the V16 engine were all Cadillac firsts. Cadillac jockeyed for for top honors in the American market (as well as a handful of fickle overseas buyers) with the likes of Packard, Pierce-Arrow and others, buoyed by customers who remained loyal for their exceptional build quality, elegant style and robust performance. 1929 saw Cadillac get a light facelift over the 1928 models, with a few tweaks made to the front end sheetmetal by a new hire to GM’s Art & Color department named Harley Earl; a man who would go on to be one of the most influential stylists in history and put GM at the top of the game in the world of design. Styling aside, the most significant changes for ’29 lay beneath the bodywork. The 341 cubic inch, 95 horsepower V8 was mated to an all-new “clashless” synchromesh gearbox, freeing drivers from the need to double clutch when changing gears and elevating Cadillac to the top of the luxury car market with this new-found ease of operation. The new gearbox allowed the car to be driven smoothly and deliver quiet, effortless performance. 1929 also saw the introduction of safety glass, yet another industry first. Braking and road holding were also excellent thanks to the powerful four-wheel mechanical brakes and Delco dual-action shock absorbers which were fitted for the first time. As typical for the era, a wide variety of standard catalog bodies by Fisher and Fleetwood were available, though customers could elect to have a chassis delivered to a coachbuilder of choice, with such famous design houses as Kellner, Murphy and Hibbard & Darrin having put their mark on Cadillac chassis, as well as a handful of somewhat less famous coachbuilders the world over. This striking 1929 Cadillac 341B wears unusual, one-off “Safari Roadster” coachwork supplied by Henry Kruse of Chelsea, London. Little is known about this particular coachbuilder or the earliest origins of this Cadillac, but it has been suggested this car was used as a game hunting car in India; the main clues being the fascinating cut-down, double-opening doors that may have been used for a hunter to lean out and sight a rifle. The very sporty and evocative body style also features a windscreen that both hinges open and folds flat, and a unique rounded tail with a large boot, in place of a traditional rumble seat. It is finished in a handsome combination of silver on the main body with black fenders, black top surfaces, and eye-catching red accents on the chassis, inside of the wings, and red coach stripes to tie it all together. It is comprehensively accessorized with dual sidemount spares topped with mirrors, dual Trippe-Light driving lamps on lovely chrome brackets, a radiator stone guard, a trunk rack, and the classic “Herald” radiator mascot. The wheels feature subtle silver painted hubs with polished spokes and trim rings and are wrapped in sporty black-wall Firestone tires. Overall quality is very good, with an older but high-standard restoration still showing in attractive order. The paint quality is quite good with consistent body and panel fitment, good quality chrome plating and detailing. The two-place cockpit is trimmed in rich red leather to complement the chassis and body accents, and is presented in very good condition, showing only slight age and signs of use since restoration. The unique split doors open fully for easier ingress, or the smaller doors can be opened independently, presumably for a hunter in India to be able to lean out with his rifle without falling completely out of the car. A full folding top is trimmed in black canvas and piped in red, with matching side curtains included. Original instruments adorn the sporty and simple black lacquered dash panel. The 341 cubic-inch V8 engine presents in very good condition, benefiting from a recent cosmetic freshening. Porcelain black heads and cylinders sit atop a cast-finish crankcase as original. The detailing is very good quality and appropriate for a car that would be best enjoyed on the road, though not out of place in a mid-level show. Previous owners have fully enjoyed this car, as it has participated in 5 Glidden Tours and is known among Cadillac LaSalle club stalwarts. It benefits from recent sorting by Brian Joseph of Classic & Exotic Service in Michigan and remains in outstanding mechanical order, ready for use and a joy to drive. This very special and unusual Cadillac is a beautiful machine with an intriguing past, and an excellent choice for CCCA CARavan Touring, Cadillac LaSalle Club and AACA events. Rare and exciting coachwork, an evocative color scheme and a well-preserved, quality restoration make this example a true standout among Full Classic Cadillacs.

    Last update: 15 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1932 Ford V8 Phaeton

    $68,500(£50,758.50)

    Henry Ford was never one to shy away from a challenge. Following the unmitigated success of the Model T and the Model A that followed, Ford took a bold step of introducing the first low-cost, mass-produced V8 car in the midst of the worst economic conditions America had ever encountered. The Model A had been a strong seller, but four-cylinder cars were beginning to fall out of favor with buyers and the V8 Ford proved to be exactly what they were looking for. Styling for the car fell to the capable hands of Henry’s son Edsel Ford. Where Henry was the pragmatist, Edsel was driven by a more creative force, and he possessed a keen eye for style. For the 1932 Ford, Edsel utilized the design experience he gained at Lincoln – a wise move that brought influence from the Ford’s most exclusive division into the realm of the everyday car. The styling was finely honed and quite pretty with flowing front fenders and a subtle V-shaped radiator grille. Ford had once again struck a chord with buyers, producing a beautiful car and bringing V8 power to the people; something that would previously have been completely out of reach of the average buyer. As with previous models, a number of body styles were available from the Ford catalog. Closed cars included the Tudor and Fordor sedans, four-seat Victoria and the rumble seat Coupe. Open cars included the Phaeton and Roadster. All models shared the same basic styling that, despite being a one-year-only design, would go on to become an icon. The “deuce” was hugely popular and remained desirable for years to come, becoming the quintessential Hot Rod and forming the basis for so many legendary custom cars.  And while it is so often the archetypal hot rod that most people think of when imagining a 1932 Ford, the simple and elegant lines of the original are what earned its status as one of the most important and seminal classic cars of the 1930s. This lovely 1932 Ford Model 18 V8 Phaeton is a very fine example that has been carefully restored to period specification. It is a very handsome car, wearing a lovely restoration by the late William Lassiter collection of West Palm Beach, Florida. It has remained totally stock, having escaped the modifications that afflict many similar cars. The body is finished in Medium Maroon over black fenders and feature lines. Bright red wheels provide a highlight and gold coachlines tie the color scheme together nicely. Paint quality is excellent, and the body is crisp and straight, having been exceptionally well maintained in fine condition since the restoration was completed. The body features dual sidemount spares, an original option in 1932, as well as a trunk rack and finely restored brightwork. The spacious cabin is trimmed in brown to a very correct standard. The seat upholstery remains in attractive condition, showing little in the way of wear or use. Door panels and the elegantly simple dash are correct and again, in fine order with all switchgear functioning as expected. A high quality LeBaron Bonney top in khaki looks great against the paint scheme and the top frame is straight, sound and works as it should. Should touring be a priority, a canvas trunk rests on the trunk rack to handle additional luggage. The engine bay is beautifully presented and highly correct with original type fittings, wiring and details. The little flathead V8 starts easily and runs strong, emitting the signature burble and smooth, easy-going nature that came to define Fords of the 30s. The engine is backed by a 3-speed manual gearbox, and the fully restored chassis is well sorted and tidy. These truly are delightful cars to drive that feel much younger than their 85 years might suggest. The V8 engine is a marvel of smoothness, delivering its power early and with minimal drama. Four wheel brakes and a proven chassis design translate into a controlled ride and safe stopping. Combine that with light steering and relatively compact dimensions and it’s no wonder why early Ford V8 enthusiasts so love driving their cars. This fine example’s older restoration has been maintained to a very high standard and remains in beautiful condition, ready for casual show or regular touring. It is a great family classic that as beautiful as it is historically important.  

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1931 Cadillac 355A Fleetwood Convertible Coupe

    $169,500(£125,599.50)

    By the time General Motors acquired Cadillac in 1909, Henry M. Leland’s company had already established itself as a leader in innovation, mechanical sophistication and luxurious quality. That spirit continued under the auspices of General Motors as it is Cadillac that brought consumers the first electric starter, the first electric lamps, the first synchromesh transmission, the first dual-plane crankshaft V8 and even the first V16 engine. From their earlies models, Cadillac was renowned for their exceptional build quality and elegant style and General Motors proudly placed them at the pinnacle of their product line where they remain to this day. Cadillac was riding a wave of success going into the 1930s. A wise decision to include a “junior” brand (LaSalle) kept the company afloat as the economy faltered. They entered the decade with a heady confidence that spawned the incredible V16 and V12 models. But Cadillac’s mainstay for the 1930s was the 355 series; an 8-cylinder model manufactured between 1931 and 1935. It was available in variety of standard body styles that ranged from a formal limousine to a sporting 2 door roadster. Cadillac’s model naming system meant the model name coincided with the engine size, but for some reason that changed in 1931 as the 355 carried over the Series 353’s 5.8 liter, 353 cubic inch V8 L-head engine. Output was a stout 95 horsepower, plenty enough to give the big Cadillac very respectable performance for its day and earn Cadillac strong sales, with more than 10,000 examples built for ’31. 1930s elegance abounds with this fine 1931 Cadillac 355A Convertible Coupe. This former CCCA Premier Award-winning example has been fully restored to a high standard and remains in excellent condition today. It is finished in an attractive combination of deep maroon over black, with a set of complementary deep maroon wire wheels. It is a lovely machine with fine quality paintwork and detailing. Of the eleven standard body styles available, the Convertible Coupe by Fleetwood ranks among the most desirable on the 355 chassis. Its sporting, elegant appearance recalls carefree playboys enjoying the trappings of their wealth as the roaring twenties came to a close. The convertible coupe combined the style and open air experience of the roadster, but with the additional comfort provided by roll up side windows and a more substantial folding roof and more luxurious trim. As with most 355-series Cadillacs, our example is well-equipped with dual sidemount spares topped with Cadillac mirrors, a mesh radiator stone guard, Goddess mascot and a pair of Senior Trippe Light driving lamps. While the restoration is approaching two decades old, the exterior cosmetics remain very strong, and this example presents very well indeed. The interior is trimmed in beautiful tan leather in excellent condition on the front seat, rumble seat, door cards and kick panels. Woodgrain trim caps the doors and dash, and the instrument fascia features a beautiful Art-Deco sunburst pattern that is the signature of the 355 Series. Original instruments remain in excellent order and all switchgear and controls function as they should. Fitment and quality of the detailing is exemplary, as one would expect from a former CCCA award winner. The convertible top is trimmed in tan canvas, with excellent fit and easy, smooth operation of the frame. Cadillac’s venerable 353 cubic inch V8 is very nicely presented in the engine compartment. It is correctly finished in porcelain-like black with correct hardware, hose clamps and detailing. This should rank as one of Cadillacs greatest engines, as it provides smooth, reliable running and outstanding performance for the era. In fact, the 355-V8 offered performance that was nearly on par with the headline-grabbing V12 and V16 cars, thanks in large part to much lighter weight when compared to its multi-cylinder stablemates. Likewise, handling and braking were more predictable as there was less weight over the front axle. The three speed synchromesh transmission makes for easy operation and strong four wheel brakes provide peace of mind in virtually all conditions. Our example is a fine running machine, needing nothing to be enjoyed on the road. There is a good reason why the Cadillac 355-series is such a highly collectible motorcar. It combines the grand elegance of the early 1930s in a mechanical package that is unintimidating and approachable for even the novice enthusiast. Our example has been treated to a very high quality restoration and has been carefully tended to since and has benefited from some light recent freshening. It remains attractive enough for show, yet is well-sorted for CCCA CARavan touring. This is a fabulous all-rounder; a beautiful restoration on a beautiful automobile.  

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1956 Packard Caribbean Coupe

    $59,500(£44,089.50)

    Packard of the mid 1950s was a rather different company than it was back in the heady pre-war classic era. Sales were slowing in the face of competition by the might of GM and Ford, and a merger with Studebaker was in the works by 1954 in attempt to boost Packard’s market share and balance the books of both firms. Despite the looming trouble, Packard’s new boss swept in from GE and immediately began to emulate what Cadillac was doing across town. For 1953, Packard tossed their hat into the ring with an ultra-luxurious “personal car”; the new Caribbean was a direct answer to the Cadillac Eldorado as well as a halo model intended to restore shine to the tarnished Packard brand. The Caribbean sat above the 300, and was loaded with leather trim and luxury equipment. The first cars wore standard bodies that were modified by Mitchell-Bentley Corporation of Michigan to feature a low, wide hood scoop and fully rounded rear wheel arches. Each year, the Caribbean evolved with freshened styling and updated power to keep it in lock-step with Cadillac, though sales never topped the initial year’s 750 units. By 1956, Caribbean was its own separate line with both a coupe and convertible offered to clients and tweaked styling based on the 400. 1956 models were powered by the 375 cubic inch Packard V8, topped with dual four-barrel Rochester carburetors and producing 310 horsepower, putting it at the top of its class. Packard’s merger with Studebaker was failing, however, and by the end of 1956 the famous Detroit plant would be shut down and production moved to South Bend. The 1956 Caribbean was the last true luxury Packard, the final chapter of over a half-century of the brand. This 1956 Caribbean coupe is a fine example from the final year of true Packard production. It is one of just 263 coupes built in 1956, slightly fewer than the convertible. In classic mid-century style, it is finished in a tri-tone combination with plenty of chrome and stainless jewelry. The main body is finished in Dover White over a Scottish Heather stripe and Maltese Gray rockers. The paint quality is good on this older restoration, with a few minor flaws to be found on close inspection, yet remaining quite attractive and shiny overall. A signature of the Caribbean coupe is the white vinyl-covered roof, this car wearing very good correct grained material. Being a classic 50s luxury car, there is lots of bright trim. The chrome plating is generally quite good, showing a bit of pitting and age in a few places, but remaining quite attractive overall. Polished stainless belt moldings separate the tri-tone paint scheme and present in good condition. A set of beautiful chrome wire wheels with Packard-logo centers look just fantastic wrapped in wide whitewall tires, de rigueur for 50s flagship motoring. Inside, this Packard has a rather unique party trick – the front and rear seat cushions are reversible between leather and fabric surfaces. The cushions simply unsnap from the base, are flipped over and snapped back in place. It’s a delightful feature that harkens back to a day when designers were truly pushing the boundaries of creativity. Those reversible seats feature tri-tone leather on one side, and two-tone “metallic” fabric on the other. Upholstery quality is excellent, showing in very good order on both sides. The leather door panels are very good, as is the extensive interior brightwork, while carpets are fair. The dash is a magnificent display of mid-century modern design; its gold textured pattern interspersed with an array of chrome instruments and emblems. The padded dash top is covered in gray vinyl and in excellent condition with no signs of shrinking or cracking. The original radio remains in the dash, and the switchgear is in good order, with equipment including power windows, brakes and steering. A lovely Packard crest ignition key adds a sense of occasion to every drive. Beneath the hood is Packard’s robust and powerful 375 cubic inch V8 which is topped with dual Rochester 4bbl carburetors and a distinctive “batwing” air cleaner. In this unique Caribbean spec, the Packard V8 makes 310 horsepower, delivering that power through a push-button Ultramatic transmission. The engine bay is very well detailed with excellent quality paint finishes, and largely correct fittings such as the original glass washer bottle and accessories. This fine Caribbean coupe is a very usable and attractive example that has benefitted from regular maintenance and use. It ticks all the right boxes for fans of big American luxury cars of the 1950s; it is hugely stylish, very rare and it represents the last of the legendary line of proper Detroit-built Packards.  

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1931 Cord L-29 Cabriolet

    $325,000(£240,825)

    When the Auburn Automobile Company was facing an ever growing well of red ink in 1924, they realized they needed to make a drastic maneuver in order to move a glut of unsold inventory  if they had any hopes of saving the firm. Auburns were quality cars, but they were also staid and somewhat boring in the face of their competition. The board at Auburn hired a hotshot young salesman; E.L. Cord with the task of turning around their fortunes. Cord was an Auburn distributor and entrepreneur and his solution to unsold stock was as genius as it was simple. A natural showman, he simply repainted the bland Auburns in bright new colors and marketed them in retail spaces around the country. His elegant plan saved the company and as a reward, he was offered a place in management. But Cord’s ambition was much higher, and rather than accept the job, he decided full control over the company was a better deal. By1928, he was in complete control of Auburn and had begun to amass an impressive manufacturing empire that included eventually Auburn, Lycoming Engines, Checker Cab, Duesenberg, Stinson Aircraft and New York Shipbuilders, among others. Having re-invented Auburn as a leader in stylish and quality automobiles, Cord decided to add a car worthy of his own name – one that would compete with the likes of Lincoln, Packard and Stutz. In typical E.L. Cord fashion, he eschewed tradition and specified a car that was both innovative and beautiful. The L-29, as it became known, was a sleek and gloriously low slung machine, thanks to its front wheel drive and a De Dion front axle arrangement which allowed the body to be mounted very low on the chassis.  The project was spearheaded by an ex-Miller engineer who had vast experience with front-drive. The L-29 shared the 301 cubic inch Lycoming straight eight with Auburn, but with engine and three-speed transmission turned 180 degrees. The forward mounted transmission meant no tunnel was needed, and the body could be mounted low in the chassis, with a flat floor for additional passenger comfort. Performance was adequate, and thanks to the low center of gravity, handling was quite impressive. Designers took full advantage of the low body height, gracing the L-29 with an array of fabulously rakish bodies. Only 4,400 L-29s were sold between 1929 and 1932, and it remains a highly collectible icon of the Classic Era. This truly stunning 1931 L-29 Cabriolet wears a recent and extremely high-quality restoration and remains in fresh, show quality condition. The known history of this wonderful car begins in 1946 when it was purchased for a mere $750 by a Mr. Huffey of Cincinnati, Ohio. Several short term owners followed until 1953 when it was purchased by Jerry Fisher, also of Ohio. It remained with Fisher for some time until reappearing in 1969 when Hubert Wood of South Charleston, Ohio acquired it and performed an amateur-level restoration, as was quite common for the time. A new owner was found in 1980, which proceeded to drive the car to his private museum in the western United States. In 2013, the car was purchased by its last owner, and a full and comprehensive restoration was undertaken. The Cord was completely disassembled and every component carefully stripped with preservation of original parts a priority. The chassis, springs and axles were stripped and painted or powder coated. The body was carefully restored using as much of the original sheet metal as possible, with the structural wood work being replaced as needed. A striking color combination was chosen with deep maroon main body and fenders accented by black stripes and black painted wire wheels. The wheels are wrapped in blackwall tires (including the dual sidemount spares) lending the car a magnificently sporty and aggressive look. The paint quality is gorgeous, with very high quality metal work and a deep beautiful gloss. The chrome trim was similarly restored to a show-quality standard and has been expertly refitted. The cabriolet body style features a two-seat cockpit up front, with room for two occasional passengers in the rumble seat. As part of the restoration, new black leather was fitted to the seats and door cards using original works patterns. The leather is piped in dark red to complement the exterior with dramatic effect. Rear passengers are treated to the same high-quality upholstery in the rumble seat. L-29s have a magnificent dash design, with beautifully ornate panels inset into the fascia and a distinctive shift lever sprouting from the dash. This car had the instruments and dash panel fully restored to the same high level as the exterior with exquisitely detailed switchgear, textured panels and intricate dials. A new black canvas top, subtly stitched in red, has been fitted to a renewed top frame with new wooden bows and restored metal components. The big Lycoming inline eight-cylinder engine was fully rebuilt with new Babbit bearings, as well as new pistons, rings and shell bearings. It also received a new camshaft and the crankshaft was polished and balanced while the cylinder block was bored, honed and the head planed. The resulting engine is strong and exceptionally smooth, supported by freshly rebuilt cooling and charging systems. Concurrently, the transmission was carefully cleaned, inspected, resealed and re-installed with a new clutch and pressure plate. Upon reassembly, the engine assembly was correctly painted and beautifully detailed with newly plated hardware and correct fittings and wiring. A truly stunning automobile, this L-29 Cabriolet is one of the most desirable of the breed. This example still wears its original engine, original body as well as original body number and serial number tags. An unrestored original trunk rack is also included. This extremely high quality restoration done in fabulous colors makes this breathtaking Cord a very worthy candidate for show at virtually any important event.

    Last update: 2 Months Old
    For sale
  • 1943 Dodge WC51 And 1943 Harley WL

    $97,500(£72,247.50)

    Dodge’s relationship with the US Military began around 1916 when Dodge Brothers supplied touring cars to the government for use in an operation against Poncho Villa and his revolutionary soldiers from Mexico. The battle, held in May of 1916 was the first time the US Army engaged in motorized battle, earning Dodge this somewhat dubious distinction. The Dodge Brothers had earned the trust of the military and they went on to supply a number of different trucks throughout the coming years. In the late 1930s, with war in Europe looming, officials needed to update the motor fleet and Dodge was once again entrusted to build a medium duty, half-ton four-wheel-drive workhorse. The first VC-series arrived in 1940, though it was essentially a stopgap model, based on a modified civilian chassis. By the time the United States entered the war, however, the purpose built WC series was beginning to hit shore around the world. The first WC-series (WC1 through WC50) was a ½ - ton truck used as a weapons carrier or staff car, depending on the body. For 1943 it was revised again with an improved body for easier troop access, and upgraded axles and suspension allowing a ¾ ton capacity. The WC51 was powered by a 230 cubic inch flathead inline six, a stout, virtually indestructible unit that was designed to run on the worst quality fuel the world had to offer. The four wheel drive system was via an in-out transfer case (no low range) and stump-pulling ratios on the New Process gearbox meant the WC could traverse virtually any terrain regardless of cargo. The Dodge WC was every bit a faithful beast of burden as the iconic Jeep, proving itself under fire in virtually every theater of World War II. This 1943 WC51 is an incredible example, exceptionally presented with period equipment that includes a genuine 1943 Harley-Davidson WL (S/N 42-2136) military-specification motorcycle on a replica trailer. The WC51 is a first series ¾-ton version with the standard Weapons Carrier body on a 98-inch chassis. It has been thoroughly restored and impeccably detailed with appropriate accessories such as full embarkation equipment (shovel, axe, camouflage netting, jerry cans, armament cases, etc.) and presented in the colors of the 82nd Airborne division. The body is properly restored to represent the true quality of a mass produced military vehicle, the previous owner wisely avoiding over-restoration. Canvas on the cab roof and cargo bed is in excellent condition, again, appearing period correct without coming across as too new. The canvas seats, accessories and markings are highly authentic and accurately represented. Towed behind the truck is a high quality replica trailer that was built using period photographs and documentation. It is very well constructed, down to the authentic spring-dampened pintle hitch and military-spec wheels. Some creative license was taken in its construction, but it has a very authentic feel, particularly in the details such as the jerry cans and ropes. The Harley Davidson WL was discovered years ago in a barracks, in a highly original state. The previous owner carefully restored the bike with just about every available accessory for the day, while still respecting the highly original condition. The entire grouping of Dodge, Harley and trailer are authentically represented and in excellent condition. The truck runs very well, with the prodigious low-end torque (which peaks at 1000 RPM) of the 230 cubic inch inline six, making it easy and enjoyable to simply leave in top gear and cruise around. The cabin is authentically represented with basic canvas seat cushions, minimal instrumentation and simple controls. The cargo box has built-in benches for carrying the “troops” and the canvas covers on the cab and cargo box are removable. Likewise, the Harley is exceptionally tidy, clean and very well presented, down to the correct lamps, leather rifle holster and canvas “blackout” covers. Such is the level of detail on this pairing that it is difficult to put into words, this amazing rig should be seen for the astounding presentation to be fully appreciated. This is a rare opportunity to acquire a real piece of World War II history, ideally suited for classic military gatherings, for enjoyment in the countryside or as a fascinating conversation piece in a collection of historically important vehicles.  

    Last update: 2 Months Old
    For sale
  • 1931 Chrysler CG Imperial Waterhouse Victoria

    $575,000(£426,075)

    Soon after Walter P. Chrysler took over the ailing Maxwell Motor Company and renamed the firm Chrysler in 1924, the company adopted the name Imperial to denote his top of the line offerings. By 1931, Imperial had evolved into a unique automobile that set itself well-apart from the rest of the Chrysler line. The new for 1931 model, known as the CG Imperial, sat atop a massive 145-inch wheelbase chassis, and the body was styled to give a low-slung and rakish appearance. Clearly influenced by the Cord L-29, the new CG Imperial featured broad, sweeping curves and a low-mounted, swept-back radiator grille. Motivation came via a mighty 385 cubic-inch straight eight producing 125-horsepower. The combination of that powerful eight-cylinder engine, coupled with advanced steering and suspension geometry, and four wheel hydraulic brakes gave the Imperial surprisingly good road manners and 100mph ability. Despite its proven ability, the CG Imperial remained a very limited car with only 339 examples built over a three year period. Considered by many to be the most beautiful Chrysler ever built, the CG Imperial is also a favorite among fans of American Classics who prefer to drive their cars as intended; such are their exquisite road manners and outstanding performance. Of the 339 CG Imperials built between 1931 and 1933, just 99 of those were shipped to coachbuilders outside of Chrysler’s favored circle. Of those 99 cars, approximately six found their way to Waterhouse and Co. of Webster, Massachusetts. Waterhouse was a relative flash in the pan in the coachbuilding world, in business only from 1928-1933, but in that time they produced a series of gorgeous and exquisitely built bodies. Their signature body style was the Convertible Victoria which Waterhouse perfected by only using long-wheelbase chassis, allowing for long, graceful lines as well as additional space for stowage to of the top when folded, giving a cleaner and elegant look. With the top in place, the low roofline, long blind quarters and boot between the rear fenders made for a striking combination – especially when sitting atop the utterly gorgeous Chrysler CG chassis. We are very pleased to offer this 1931 Chrysler CG Imperial Waterhouse Convertible Victoria, a stunning example wearing highly prized coachwork. The known history of this fabulous motorcar, chassis CG 3843, dates back to 1939 when Mr. Calvin Collins of Pennsylvania purchased it from the McCormick Garage. The Collins family enjoyed the CG for several years until the car was taken off the road. Repeated war-era scrap drives threatened the car’s very existence, but Calvin’s young son Scott Collins recognized how very special his family’s Chrysler was, and pleaded its case to be spared from the scrapper. The car was holed up in the family barn as young Scott dreamed of returning the car to its former glory. Over the years, parts were collected as needed and finally, in 2009, after a remarkable 70 years in the Collins family, Scott offered the car to the respected Canadian restorer Richard Grenon who jumped at the opportunity to purchase it. Upon closer inspection, Grenon and his son discovered the chassis was in remarkably good condition considering what it had endured, and the aluminum body had survived the years quite well with minimal damage. Much of the structural wood had to be replaced, though he found many of the surviving wood components and smaller chrome items stamped with “163”, the original Waterhouse job number. Over 6,000 hours were spent painstakingly restoring CG 3843, and today it is presented in its original color scheme of a black main body with unique caramel colored side stripes, chassis and wheels. Upon its completion, the car was shown at the Ault Park Concours where it was awarded a class win, as well as the William K. Victor Best of Show Award, an incredible achievement for a car finished just days prior. CG 3843 remains in stunning condition, having been carefully maintained since the restoration and shown in numerous events including the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 2012. As one would expect from such a restoration, paint and finish quality is outstanding with hardly a flaw to be found. The chrome is also beautifully presented with show-quality plating on the radiator grille, bumpers and minor trim. The body is minimally adorned, which imparts a very European flavor, particularly in combination with the low ride height and black-wall Firestone tires – originally specified by Waterhouse to highlight the beautiful coachwork. Dual Chrysler-branded mirrors top the side mount spares, and a Gazelle mascot sits atop the radiator; a fitting symbol for such a sporting machine. The interior is trimmed in incredibly supple caramel-colored leather as original, executed to a concours quality standard. Likewise, the black canvas top and canvas side-mount covers are expertly fitted. A tan leather top boot is included to cover the soft top when it is folded and the windscreen features an interesting fabric exterior sun visor. The cockpit is surrounded with subtle but fine quality wood trim, while the dash is beautifully elegant – a simple body colored panel fitted with exquisitely restored instrumentation. One signature of the Waterhouse design is the pair of courtesy lights built in to the top frame, a nice touch for rear seat passengers. The CG Imperial’s 385 Cubic Inch inline eight cylinder engine is of course, up to the standard of the rest of the car with correct porcelain-black finishes and paint colors on the engine and cylinder head. Detailing on the ancillaries is exquisite; the engine presenting as a stunning piece of industrial art. Thankfully, the restorer took the time to ensure it performs as well as it looks and has since proven itself on events such as the Pebble Beach Tour d’Elegance. The comfortable seating position, relatively light steering and powerful four-wheel hydraulic brakes make the CG an outstanding machine for touring. It remains in top condition, having just this year taken Best in Show honors at the Muckenthaler Concours, as well as the Huntington Beach Concours. It was also awarded 99.5 points and 1st in class (out of 24 cars!) at the San Marino Motor Classic CCCA event, also in 2017. The CG Imperial is no doubt one of the most alluring Chryslers ever produced, and this example, with its achingly beautiful coachwork by Waterhouse and gorgeous presentation make it among the most desirable of the breed. With only three known examples to survive, this represents an extremely rare opportunity to acquire one of the finest and most important Chrysler CG Imperials extant.      

    Last update: 25 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1936 Lincoln K Convertible Sedan

    $89,500(£66,319.50)

    Lincoln Motor Car Company’s flagship model in the 1930s was the prestigious Model K. When introduced in 1931, Lincoln was under the full control of the Ford Motor Company, as Henry Leland had been pushed out by a revenge-seeking Henry Ford. Henry put his son Edsel in charge and almost immediately, Lincoln enjoyed a turnaround. The flagship Model K hit the showrooms in 1931 powered by an L-head V8 engine. Power was more than adequate but with ever increasing pressure to build multi-cylinder engines such as the V12 and V16, Ford swiftly responded with the addition of the V12 Model KB in 1932, followed by the smaller displacement KA. The early years of the Great Depression meant that sales were slim, but the V12 remained the signature of the K-series through 1939. The biggest change coming in 1934 when the two available sizes of V12 engines were combined into one singular 414 cubic inch unit. Most of America’s luxury car manufacturers had added entry level lines to boost the bottom line during the Great Depression. Packard had the Junior series, Cadillac offered LaSalle and, while late to the game, Ford introduced the Zephyr range to bridge the gap between top line Fords and the prestigious Model K in 1936. The new Zephyr was also powered by a V12 engine, and was surely stealing sales from its older sibling, but Lincoln continued to offer the Model K for high end buyers, who now had 17 different custom body styles to select from. For the 1936 K-series (the KA and KB monikers had been dropped), styling was tweaked with a raked windscreen, revised radiator grille and optional stamped steel wheels. On the mechanical side, the 414 cubic inch flathead V-12 engine was updated with hydraulic lifters and a revised cam shaft and placed further forward in the chassis sitting to allow for more passenger room. The resulting car was elegant and understated, yet it still had an imposing presence that demanded attention. This 1936 Lincoln K wears a rare and desirable Convertible Sedan body from the Lincoln catalog. It wears an older restoration that has held up very well, although it is showing its age in a few places. The body is in very nice condition, with straight panels and good fitment of the doors and hood. Paint quality is good, though some small touchups have been made here and there. The colors are indeed a bit unconventional, but the body style itself is quite attractive, with its sloping rear trunk, low roof line, and curvaceous front fenders with dual-sidemount spares. The spare wheels are housed within metal covers that are topped with side-view mirrors. A greyhound mascot adorns the radiator grill, while out back a trunk rack supplements the integrated trunk in the body. Chrome bumpers are in quite good condition, and the painted wire wheels are adorned with chrome center caps and wide whitewall tires. Doors open with a satisfying quality to reveal the brown leather interior which, while older, remains supple and clean. The seats and carpets are in good condition front and rear, exhibiting signs of use but not excessively worn. Instruments appear to be in original condition, along with much of the switchgear. A later turn signal switch has been added for safety. Interior fittings are in good condition and the chrome on the window winders, door handles and other areas remains very presentable. In the rear, a robe rail is affixed to the back of the front seat, and again, the leather is in good presentable condition. The tan canvas convertible top is piped in brown to complement the interior, there is a small repair on the top, but it remains attractive and serviceable. The engine compartment, while not concours, is clean and nicely detailed, the big 414 cubic inch flathead V12 engine starts easily and runs very well, with the signature smooth, virtually silent idle that defines these 1930s multi-cylinder engines. Very few of these open cars were originally sold, since in 1936, a Model K 7-passenger Limousine cost a rather steep $4,700. This more complex Convertible Sedan would have come in above that. Given the competition from within by the Zephyr, it is no wonder that sales of the K were limited. This 1936 Lincoln K features rare and desirable coachwork, and is a very enjoyable car for CCCA CARavans, local shows, or Sunday drives.

    Last update: 2 Months Old
    For sale