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Hyman Ltd Cars for sale

84 Search results
  • 1988 Porsche 928 S4 Coupe

    $31,500(£25,744.95)

    The automobile market in the United States was changing rapidly during the early 1970s, and America was by far Porsche’s biggest market. The bosses in Stuttgart felt that the 911 might not have much of a future, and resolved to design an entirely new Porsche from scratch that would meet all foreseeable American federal regulations and, if necessary, even replace the venerable 911 altogether. The result, called the 928, was a radically different car by Porsche standards. The engine was up front. It had eight cylinders arranged in a 90-degree V pattern. It was water-cooled. The bodywork was also very different from anything else from Porsche, and its overall design and purpose was more luxury GT car than sports car. Different though it was, the 928 received much acclaim for its clever design and impressive performance, and thanks to its high price tag it was an immediate status symbol. By the time the 928 S arrived in 1984, its 4.7-liter 16-valve V-8 was good for a top speed of 146 miles per hour, while the 928’s brilliant “Weissach Axle” rear suspension made for sharp but forgiving and predictable handling. The car became faster still with the arrival of a 5.0-liter V-8 in 1985, and by the time of the arrival of the 928 S4 in 1987 this engine made 316 hp. The interior, meanwhile, featured supportive leather seats and all the comforts of a true modern luxury GT. Even by today’s standards, the 928 is an impressive car, and it is also a fairly undervalued automobile, a rare trait in today’s Porsche market. This 1988 Porsche 928 S4 is a one-owner car from new with 87,500 actual miles, although it looks and runs like a car with a fraction of that. Finished in an attractive black over black leather, it has alloy wheels, sunroof and an automatic transmission, and comes with a complete service history as well as all of the original books, tools, window sticker, and a copy of the original invoice. Bought new in Ohio, the 928 was only driven in the summer there before moving in the mid-1990s to Naples, Florida, where it was only driven in the winter. Aside from a repainted nose, the black paint is all original and in great condition, as is practically everything else on the car. The single previous owner was fastidious in keeping up with any and all necessary maintenance as well as keeping the 928 clean and out of the elements. Because 928s have traditionally been undervalued and offered so much car for the money, many have found themselves victims of neglect and deferred maintenance. Sometimes, even examples that look quite good on the surface can have extensive mechanical needs underneath. Cars like this that have consistent, documented and proper care from a single sympathetic owner are therefore ideal, but such examples are rare. This example is therefore a standout as it has been reassuringly well-documented and remains in gorgeous original condition.

    Last update: 1 Day Old
    For sale
    Hyman Ltd
    314-524-6000 VIEW CONTACT NUMBER
  • 1972 Ferrari 365 GTC/4 Coupe

    $359,500(£293,819.35)

    From 1960 onward, Ferrari’s portfolio has consistently offered a four-seat model for buyers who desired performance without sacrificing practicality. Enzo Ferrari was of course a racer at heart, but his road car business needed to be successful to fully fund the racing efforts. As such, he was more than happy to offer clients what they wanted when it came to an extra pair of seats in the back. Beginning with the 250 GTE of 1960, the formula of a front engine, V12, four-seat Ferrari has carried on almost unbroken to today’s radical FF. The 330GT 2+2 and 365GT 2+2 were evolutions of the 250GTE, with generous rear seats and classic European GT proportions. The 365GT 2+2 grew quite large and featured power steering, air conditioning, and a supple ride from the long wheelbase chassis and self-leveling hydropneumatic rear suspension. There was so much luxury it was almost as if Ferrari had attempted to build a Cadillac! It proved popular with buyers, with more than 800 examples finding homes through 1971. For its replacement Ferrari made a rather dramatic about-face. The new car debuted at the Geneva Auto Show in early 1971 wearing radically different coachwork by Pininfarina that displayed a very close family resemblance to the mighty Daytona. The 365 GTC/4 moniker wasn’t terribly exciting, but one look at the spec sheet and the new sheetmetal would get the heart racing. The chassis was in large part based on the Daytona, stretched by 100mm to accommodate the (somewhat vestigial) rear seats and a more commodious boot. The four-cam, 4.4 liter V12 differed from the Daytona in that it wore a sextet of side-draught Weber 38 DCOE carburetors, employed to keep the bonnet line low. It produced a healthy 320hp, pushing the sleek new 2+2 to 152 miles per hour. ZF power steering was added, as were power brakes and the Koni self-leveling suspension carried over from the outgoing model. The overall effect was that of a more sophisticated, softer-edged alternative to brutish Daytona. Just 500 examples were built over a remarkably short production run of 18 months, making it rarer than both the Daytona and the 365 GT 2+2. Our featured example is chassis number 15211 which was originally sold via Chinetti-Garthwaite Motors of Paoli, Pennsylvania. From the early 80s it was in the hands of a Californian owner who kept the car through 1987, when it was transferred to Ed Fries of Las Vegas, Nevada. From there, it was exported to Switzerland where it was lovingly restored to exacting standards by the renowned marque specialist, Bruno Wyess. The restoration was performed with no expense spared, reportedly totaling over $250,000. Since the restoration and its return to US soil, it has remained in exemplary condition, having been used sparingly and exceptionally well preserved. The Pininfarina body is lovely and crisp, with excellent shut lines, and proper definition to the signature edges and curves. Atop the beautifully straight body is a fabulous paint job in the original red. It now rides on a set of Borrani wire wheels which retain the original type-stamping, indicating they haven’t been over polished or damaged. The wheels are shod with proper Michelin XWX tires. All trim, lamps, and badging are correct and present in excellent order. Inside, the cabin is dominated by the large, sloping center console that acts as “command central” for the driver. Black leather on the seats and door cards is in simply gorgeous condition, showing very light use since the restoration. Full instrumentation is correct (though the speedo has been calibrated to KM during its time in Switzerland) and all in working order. Controls for the factory air conditioning, power windows and ventilation are all in excellent condition and of course, the lever for the 5-speed manual gearbox falls right to hand. A period correct Becker Mexico radio has been fitted to keep everything looking period proper. Beyond the interior equipment, this example includes the full briefcase tool kit, jack bag with original jack, hammer and other tools, and an extremely rare and desirable spare bulb and fuse kit. The chassis and engine bay of 15211 present exceptionally well. The suspension arms and fittings have been correctly plated in gold and silver cadmium as appropriate, both front and rear. It rides on a set of Koni coil overs, with passive dampers replacing the oft-troublesome self-leveling units in the rear. This is seen as a welcome upgrade by most enthusiasts as it removes complexity and improves both handling and reliability. A new and correct Ansa exhaust system was recently fitted at great expense. Lifting the front-hinged hood reveals the beautiful four-cam V12, dominated by the six side draught Webers, necessary to keep the bonnet line low and sleek. Proper fittings, clamps, and hoses are used throughout, showing only the slightest signs of use and care. It is extremely tidy and well-presented though not so clinically clean that one would be discouraged from driving. Therein lays the beauty of this gorgeous 365GTC/4. It is a thoroughly sorted and road ready example of what is oft considered the Driver’s alternative to a Daytona. Restored to a very high standard, it been shown on occasion and won its class at the Santa Fe Concours in 2014. It still remains beautiful enough for regional concours events and the quality of the restoration means it is highly rewarding to drive. Sale includes service handbook, original owner’s manuals (both English and Italian) and aforementioned tools.

    Last update: 9 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1968 Iso Rivolta IR 300 Coupe

    $69,500(£56,802.35)

    Italian industrialist and engineer Renzo Rivolta is a bit of an unsung hero in the annals of automotive history. His motoring career began in 1942 with the purchase of Isothermos, an Italian refrigerator manufacturer. Rivolta was a proper petrol head, and he frankly had little interest in refrigeration, so he added motorcycles and scooters to the company’s portfolio, reincorporating it as Iso Autoveicoli S.p.A. Renzo’s motorcycles were particularly expensive at a time when Italians needed affordable transport more than anything, but they were built exceptionally well and earned a positive reputation for quality and performance. To answer the needs of the buying public in a still-recovering post-war Italy, Iso introduced the Isetta; a three wheeled (later updated to four) microcar with a single front door and a distinct bubble shape. Approximately 20,000 examples were built in the Iso works before Rivolta had an epiphany: The rest of Europe was still in need of cheap transport, and since his plant couldn’t build enough Isettas to meet demand, he licensed the design to other manufacturers around the world. BMW was the most successful, selling approximately 130,000 units through the 1960s. As an aside, fans of the Bavarian marque have Renzo Rivolta and his cheeky microcar to thank for saving BMW from the brink of bankruptcy and a certain takeover by Mercedes Benz. On the heels of the success of the Isetta, Renzo Rivolta turned his efforts to producing a luxurious GT car that he felt could offer better value and luxury than Ferrari. He took a page from Sydney Allard (among others, of course) by stuffing a proven, reliable and affordable American V8 into a more sophisticated chassis, one that was better suited to putting that power to the ground. The Iso Rivolta IR300 first appeared in 1962. Designed in partnership with legendary Ferrari engineer Giotto Bizzarrini, the attractive four-seat Grand Tourer rode on a steel platform chassis and featured independent front and deDion rear suspension. Power came via Chevrolet’s Corvette-spec 327 cubic inch (5.4 liter) V8 making 300 horsepower and a choice of either automatic or manual transmissions. Styling was by Giorgetto Giugiaro at Ghia, and was crisp and distinctive with delicate pillars, a sharp feature line down the body and finely judged curves and creases on the front fenders and grille. It was a full four seat car that could transport occupants in supreme comfort with outstanding performance. The Iso Rivolta made no impressions of being a racer or sports car – it was meant to carry four passengers at high speed and deliver a memorable drive. With its luxurious and comfortable cabin, the Rivolta was delightfully described in period literature as having “Efficient functioning united to sober elegance”. The literature went on to proclaim the Iso Rivolta was “Silent from 40-240 (kph) in top gear!” Priced between a Jaguar and a Ferrari, the Rivolta found moderate success, selling 799 units between 1962 and 1969. This 1968 IR300 was built on September 12, 1967 and dispatched to the US.  It was originally equipped with the 300 horsepower engine, automatic, and air conditioning, and is a complete, running example that was used and enjoyed on a regular basis until it was parked approximately 18 years ago. While it requires a comprehensive restoration, it is not a basket case or a nightmare of missing parts as so many projects can be. This Rivolta remains complete and intact, with most of its delicate trim and detailing in place. The body is quite straight and appears free of any major accident damage, though the sills, lower quarters and floors require replacement. Importantly, the bumpers, lamps, grille and window trims are all intact, presenting in fair condition and the car rides on a set of rare and desirable Campagnolo alloy wheels. The black interior is in similar condition to the body; tired and needing restoration, though complete and appearing never to have been removed from the car. The dash retains all original switchgear and instrumentation. Chevrolet’s robust 327 V8 looks to be completely intact and is fitted with original air conditioning. There is an aftermarket air cleaner, though the engine bay appears otherwise mainly original. Our mechanics carefully inspected the engine to ensure it was free, and fired it up to discover it still has good oil pressure and runs rather well. Of course, it should not be driven in its current state, but it does form the basis of what would be a fairly straightforward restoration. Without complex and expensive running gear, this Iso can be a more approachable prospect for restoring, and this example represents a blank canvas for which to best highlight its distinctive style. With just 800 examples produced, the IR300 is a rare and desirable Italian GT car that delivered excellent performance in a handsome, Giugiaro-designed body.

    Last update: 3 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1969 Iso Rivolta IR 340 Coupe

    $169,500(£138,532.35)

    The story of Iso Automobili begins with “Isothermos”, a refrigerator manufacturer in Genoa, Italy. In 1942, a motor-mad industrialist and engineer named Renzo Rivolta took over the business, renamed it Iso Autoveicoli and moved the whole works to Bresso, just outside of Milan. Under Rivolta’s guidance, Iso gradually moved away from refrigeration and began building motorcycle around 1948. Iso motorcycles were very expensive, but also very desirable thanks to robust engineering and exquisite build quality. In the early years after World War II, Italy was struggling to recover from the pummeling it received by both Allied and Axis forces. Motorcycles were popular, providing cheap transportation to get the nation back on wheels. But people also needed something more practical and usable on a daily basis. Iso unveiled the Isetta bubble car in 1953 – a three (later four) wheeled car powered by a motorbike engine and with room for two adults and a bag or two of groceries. The cheeky little Isetta proved popular enough to inspire Renzo Rivolta to sell the rights to produce his car to other manufacturers. Most notably, it is the car that helped BMW survive the post-war years and put Germany back on wheels. Selling the rights afforded Rivolta a generous pile of cash which he in turn used to develop a rather more luxurious machine compared to the tiny Isetta. In the early 1960’s Renzo Rivolta teamed up with Giotto Bizzarrini and Giorgetto Giugiaro on GT car that was more suited to the rapidly recovering global market. The new car, named Rivolta, is one of the first examples of the “hybrid” sports car to come out of Europe in the 1960’s. Italian designed and built, the car was constructed with a pressed sheet steel frame and fitted with a proven, reliable and affordable Chevrolet 327 V8 lifted from the Corvette. The suspension was comprised of wishbones up front and a proven DeDion rear axle with limited slip Salisbury diff – a tough and reliable unit used by Jaguar for years. Also courtesy of the Brits were the Dunlop four-wheel disc brakes. The Iso Rivolta was rounded out with luxurious and comfortable four-seat cabin, delightfully described in period literature as having “Efficient functioning united to sober elegance”.  Performance was strong thanks to a minimum of 300hp from the Corvette engine in the IR 300, and 350hp from the IR 340. The literature also proclaimed the Iso Rivolta was “Silent from 40-240 (kph) in top gear!” That was enough to convince 792 lucky buyers over a 7 year span to shell out their hard earned Lire for a chance to own one of these stylish and elegant GT cars. This 1969 Iso Rivolta IR 340 is one of the very last Rivolta’s made.  The car was completed on March 5, 1969, and delivered new to Sig. Oglihri in Italy, and was equipped with the 350 hp motor, 4 speed transmission, 3.31 rear end, Borrani wheels, air conditioning, and quick steering.  It is a very pretty and well restored example that has benefited from proper care while in the hands of a marque enthusiast, and is one of only 167 produced with the higher horsepower motor.  The paint quality is very good, the older restoration having been done to a high standard. Panel fit is excellent the gaps are consistent, and the body lines crisp and well defined. The red paint is very attractive, accented with good quality chrome and polished brightwork. The aforementioned Borrani wheels are painted in the proper shade of silver/gray, lending an understated and classic look to the Giugiaro-penned lines. The wheels wear new Vredestein tires that offer the proper period look combined with modern performance. The Rivolta was an expensive and luxurious GT car for its day, with a beautifully finished cabin and plenty of standard equipment. Our fine example doesn’t disappoint when you climb aboard. Occupants are treated to tan leather covering the four seats, door panels and dash. The interior was retrimmed some time ago but remains in excellent condition, showing little wear, exhibiting a pleasingly broken-in quality. Brown carpets complement the tan leather very nicely and present in fine condition. This car wears original air conditioning, power windows, original shift knob and steering wheel. The wood instrument panel is in excellent condition, fitted with an array of original European-specification gauges. This fabulous example retains its original matching numbers matching 350 hp Corvette-sourcedengine, and as such returns excellent performance and reliability. It is also very easily serviced by any competent classic car specialist, making it an ideal choice for Italian car enthusiasts who prefer to drive their cars on a regular basis without worrisome service bills. Few examples of the handsome Iso Rivolta are as correct and well presented, and thanks to regular care it is very healthy and ready for Grand Touring in classic Italian style.  

    Last update: 1 Day Old
    For sale
  • 1971 Datsun 240Z Coupe

    $69,500(£56,802.35)

    In the late 1960s, the Japanese auto industry had a new sense of confidence as they finally found their stride with uniquely designed and meticulously engineered cars. Earlier in the decade, American buyers saw Japanese cars as novelties or oddballs, cars to be avoided especially for those who still had WWII fresh in their mind. The earliest Japanese sports cars borrowed heavily from their two-wheeled counterparts, particularly Honda with its bike-engined S600 coupe and roadsters. Nissan-Datsun took a slightly different approach in the middle of the 1960s, with their take on the traditional British sports car. The Datsun 1600 and 2000 Fairlady roadsters were aimed squarely at the MGB, Triumph TR4 and Sunbeam Alpine. Datsun held the upper hand thanks to its 5-speed gearbox and beautiful 135hp overhead-cam engine. The British cars felt positively agricultural in comparison. Combined with the mechanically similar 510 sedan, Datusn enjoyed moderate success in the US market, demonstrating the Japanese could build a very capable competitor to the best of the British roadsters. Enthusiasts and club racers knew the Datsun was the superior car, though Japanese cars still struggled against the attitudes in the US. When the Fairlady 2000 was due for replacement, Datsun decided to go all out and design a sports car specifically for the critical North American market. The basic formula for the new 240Z sports car drew inspiration from Jaguar’s E-Type. The elegant 2-seat coupe body was designed in-house by Yoshihiko Matsuo at the Nissan sports car studio. A 2.4 liter, overhead-cam inline-six was chosen along with four wheel independent suspension and front disc brakes. The 240Z was very pretty, could punch above its weight in terms of performance, and had a build quality unseen in its British rivals. Yutaka Katayama (known to loyal Z-car fans as “Mr. K”) was the driving force responsible for marketing the Z in the North American market. His effort to promote 240Z paid dividends for the Japanese industry as a whole, whole he developed a cult following for his sports car, Nissan, Toyota and Honda all benefitted from a newfound respect and admiration for the quality of Japanese cars. In 1997, with the 300ZX nearing the end of production and the 350Z still several years off, Nissan sought to cash in on the still-vibrant community of 240Z enthusiasts. They bought a handful of solid, original 1970 and 1971 240Zs and handed them over one of three carefully selected restoration shops to be fully restored from the ground up, using as many factory parts as possible. The restored cars were then sold “new” in select Nissan dealers around the country. It was a brilliant move for Nissan, as they reignited the passion for these wonderful cars and helped to boost the value and interest in all other 240Zs. Our featured 1971 Datsun 240Z is one of the finest examples we’ve ever encountered. This well-documented California car has covered just 200 miles since a four-year, obsessively detailed nut and bolt restoration by Les Cannaday’s Classic Datsun Motorsport, one of those select shops chosen by Nissan to restore their own cars. While this car is not one of Nissan’s dealer cars, it is no less spectacularly restored to exacting standards by a respected marque expert. Presented in its original color of Orange (code 918) over black interior, it is a stunning and thoroughly correct 240Z. The body fit and finish are superlative, all trim is correct and in as-new condition and the car rides on a set of classic slotted alloy wheels. The paint is beautifully laid down and it even wears a set of the seldom seen optional black stripes on the rockers, a wonderful period touch that is often overlooked in lesser restorations. The black interior is upholstered in factory correct materials and executed beautifully. Likewise, the engine bay and undercarriage are fully detailed with correct decals, tags, braided hoses, clamps and gold-cadmium plated hardware. Rarely do we see 240Zs restored to such a level of excellence and with such meticulous attention to detail. Even the owner’s manual is original to this car, down to the matching warranty card. The trunk is properly detailed as well with a full original tool kit including the original wheel chock. The beloved Mr. K, who passed away in 2015 at 105 years old, put his mark of approval on this restoration, in the form of his signature on the glovebox. This is a concours-quality car that also happens to be a fabulous thing to drive; we have tested it on some of our favorite local roads and are happy to report it is simply a joy. Clearly this was a cherished car from day one. As a basis for restoration, this was a very solid, very original and sound example with long-term California history, sold new by Varsity Datsun of Davis, CA. It was never rotted or crashed and the results of the restoration attest to that fact. For show or to drive, one would be hard pressed to find a better 240Z available today. .

    Last update: 22 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1934 Packard Super Eight Coupe

    $169,500(£138,532.35)

    Long considered one of the most beautiful of all Classic Era production automobiles, Packard’s gorgeous 11th series is one of the finest of its kind. These gorgeous machines marked the turning point for Packard styling, as the full-figured front fenders grew ever more integrated into the bodywork from 1935 onward. Not only beautiful, they were also magnificently engineered – conservative in terms of technology, but robust, exceptionally well-constructed and very rewarding to drive. The three models of the 11th series were available on three different wheelbase chassis. In total, 41 different combinations of engines, wheelbases and body styles were available to buyers. Adding diversity and prestige to the range were 17 'catalog customs' bodied by coachbuilders LeBaron and Dietrich. The two-seat (with rumble seat) coupe body was one of the most sporting styles on offer, appealing to wealthy playboys who didn’t have to worry about seating a family. Only the two-seat roadster could top the coupe in terms of pure form over function. For many years, the two seat coupe was seen as an ideal candidate to convert to an open roadster, when values for the roadsters skyrocketed, many unscrupulous restorers took advantage by lopping the roofs off coupes. As a result, an uncut, unmolested coupe has become a true rarity in the Packard world. With newfound appreciation for these gorgeous automobiles, they have become ever more desirable, particularly for enthusiasts who enjoy touring with their Packards. The Rumble Seat Coupe strikes an ideal balance of stunning style with all-weather capability. Combine that with legendary Packard reliability and ease of use, and you have a near-perfect choice for classic touring and events. Our featured 1934 Packard Super Eight Coupe is a very fine example of this rare and desirable factory body. Very few have survived over the years, with many being rebodied or cut into roadsters. The most recent keeper of this lovely Packard acquired the car from long-term ownership on the East Coast. The older restoration presents exceptionally well in its striking two-tone paint combination of red with dark burgundy fenders and swage lines. The paint looks great, but up close it is showing its age, with some crazing evident in the red.  It is well optioned with dual side-mount spare wheels with fully enveloping metal covers, Swan radiator mascot, dual Trippe driving lights, gorgeous new chrome wire wheels shod with proper wide whitewall tires and a genuine Packard trunk sitting atop the trunk rack. Red painted brake drums appear behind the chrome wires, imparting a decidedly sporty look. The chrome trim is in very good condition, showing just a slight bit of age in places but otherwise still supremely attractive and in keeping with the overall feeling of quality of this restoration. This is quite simply a visually stunning machine from all angles, the proportions border on perfection, thanks in no small part to the grand 142” wheelbase of the Super Eight chassis. Occupants of this wonderful machine are cosseted in freshly upholstered black leather seats. Matching black door panels are capped with gorgeous wood trim which flows into a beautiful woodgrain dash. The instrument panel features a full array of gauges in a beautifully detailed chrome and paint binnacle. The dash, steering wheel and instruments show just a slight bit of patina from use since the restoration, making it a very pleasing and comfortable place to spend an afternoon of motoring. This being a two-place coupe, a rumble seat is out back for occasional rear passengers, which is trimmed in black leather to match the cabin. Packard’s big 384.8 cubic inch L-head inline eight produces a silken 145 horsepower and an ocean of effortless torque. It puts power through a three speed manual gearbox which is known for its ease of operation and smooth shifting. Every car enthusiast should experience driving a Packard of this era at least once, as they are surprisingly tractable, incredibly smooth and remarkably easy to drive for such a large and grand car. This example’s big Eight is tidy and clean in the engine bay, presented in proper Packard green on the block with a silver crankcase. Importantly, it is also the original engine to this car, as indicated by the chassis and engine numbers being in very close sequence. Correct plug wires and other details make for an attractive yet functional look. Some signs of use are apparent, making this a car that encourages one to drive rather than to sit it in a garage and keep sterile. The chassis is likewise tidy and fully functional, with excellent four-wheel mechanical brakes keeping things under control. The 1934 Super Eight is one of the most highly regarded models from Packard, and many enthusiasts believe the 11th series to be the pinnacle of this storied marque. This gorgeous example is of course a recognized CCCA Full Classic and would be a simply sublime choice for CARavan touring, AACA Touring or simply weekend exploring your favorite roads.    

    Last update: 12 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1934 Rolls-Royce 20/25 Tourer

    $139,500(£114,013.35)

    Rolls-Royce’s 20/25 succeeded the 20 H.P. in 1929 as the company’s “Small Car” offering intended for clients who chose to drive themselves rather than be driven. A vast array of improvements were made over the 20 HP, and while this was considered an entry level car by Rolls-Royce standards, it was still very much an exclusive, high end automobile that competed with the likes of the Alvis Speed 20, Hispano Suiza HS26 and the large 20hp Sunbeams. Also, it carried on the Rolls-Royce tradition in that it was offered as a complete chassis, less body, so customers specified their preferred coachbuilder at the time of ordering. As a result, a wide variety of 20/25s were built; ranging from formal closed limousines through sporting open roadsters with just about every imaginable configuration in between. The overhead-valve inline six-cylinder engine was similar to the outgoing 20 HP, but enlarged to 3,669 cc. Both coil and magneto ignition systems were provided, and the four-speed manual gearbox returned with traditional right-hand shift. Early 20hp models had a central shifter on the 3-speed gearbox which was (rather curiously) condemned by the public as appearing cheap and not to the standard expected of Rolls-Royce. The chassis of the 20/25 was a traditionally robust affair, with solid front and rear axles, semi-elliptic springs and four-wheel brakes assisted by a mechanical servo. The improved engine of the 20/25 afforded this new driver-focused Rolls-Royce with 75 mph performance, depending on the body configuration selected. Of course, heavier and more luxurious Saloons and limousines were hampered by their weight, but were nonetheless enjoyable to drive thanks to their smaller dimensions and uncompromised build quality. 4,000 were built between 1929 and 1936 making this one of the most successful Rolls-Royces of the period. The Twenty, 20/25 and their successors set Rolls-Royce on a path to success, for it was these owner/driver-focused models that formed the basis for Rolls-Royce production through the 1930s, 1940s, and into the post-war era. A top-line, Chauffeur driven model would remain as part of the line through the 1990s (with the Phantom VI), but it was the “entry-level” cars that sustained the company through today. Our featured 1934 20/25 is a handsome machine wearing sporty tourer bodywork, constructed in the style of 10EX, an experimental Phantom 1 chassis originally bodied by Barker. While most 20/25s were rather conservatively styled, this car features a rakish and exciting open four-seat body with a tapered, semi-boattail trunk – dubbed “bordino” by Italian coachbuilders of the period. The sporting body is accented by sparse, flared racing-style fenders, disc wheel covers and minimal exterior detailing (most notably, a lack of externally mounted spare wheels). The presentation of this 20/25 is outstanding, thanks to a comprehensive, body-off restoration performed while in the hands of the previous owner. According to RROC build sheets and records, this 20/25 was originally delivered to G. Vaughan Morgan of South Kensington, London, wearing D-back Limousine coachwork by Hooper. This lovely motorcar eventually found its way to the hands of Robert Collins of Miami, Florida. Mr. Collins then sold the car to a Midwestern collector who retained the car in his expert care from 1974 through 2013. Though fully restored, it is easy to see this was always a very well kept and cherished automobile. Bright red paint on the body is beautiful, free of noticeable flaws, and accented by a well-judged shade of dark red on the wings and sills. The body construction is of very high quality and the detailing is outstanding. Proper tripod headlamps are fitted as is a centrally-mounted spot lamp. The windscreen folds flat for the ultimate in 1930s sports-motoring, and a pair of very cool period Shell Motor Spirit fuel canisters are strapped to either running board. The cockpit is trimmed in lovely black leather which shows just the slightest signs of regular use and is extremely inviting and barely broken-in. The gorgeous burl-wood dash is exquisite, with centrally mounted instruments and typically over-engineered switchgear. This is a right hand drive model with right hand shift, allowing for plenty of passenger space up front. In the rear, black leather and high-quality carpet appear to have hardly been used, and a strip of matching burl wood on the rear cowl mimics that on the dash. The numbers-matching drivetrain is equally well-presented and has been restored to provide trouble-free motoring. This stylish, sporting and beautifully presented 20/25 is an unusual example of this traditionally staid model from Rolls-Royce. As a late production 1934 model, it benefits from the running improvements made by the factory, such as a 100hp engine and four-speed gearbox with synchromesh on the top two cogs. It is a joy to operate and would no doubt be a very fine and enjoyable choice for RROC or AACA touring, especially considering its original intent as the Driver’s Rolls-Royce.

    Last update: 21 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1970 Maserati Indy

    $119,500(£97,667.35)

    Two prototypes for a sleek new four-seat Maserati were shown at the 1968 Turin Auto Show, one each from Carrozzerie Vignale and Ghia who both had history with Maserati.  The Vignale prototype was selected and shown in production form as the Maserati Indy Vignale Coupe at the Geneva Auto Show in 1969.  Like some previous Maseratis, the name was chosen to celebrate the marque’s great racing history – in this case, the Maserati 8C TF’s dominating victories at the Indianapolis 500 in 1939-1940. The Maserati Indy was designed as a full four-place luxury grand touring car in spite of the sleek two-door coupe profile.  The heart of the design was a front-mounted all-alloy dohc 4.2-liter V-8 engine fed by four Weber carburetors and mated to a 5-speed ZF gearbox (or 3-speed automatic), mounted in a 102.4-inch wheelbase.  A 4.7-liter V-8 was first offered in mid-1970, and a 315-320 hp 4.9-liter V-8 in 1973 with a claimed 170 mph top speed only slightly less than the two-place Ghibli.  The luxurious leather interior of the Indy provided ample room to travel long distances in comfort with an almost horizontal lift-up hatch giving easy access to 18 cu. ft. of luggage space. This exceptional European-spec Maserati Indy Vignale Coupe was completed on October 8, 1970 and originated as a 4.7-liter, with Girling four-wheel disc brakes and the additional bright rocker panel trim that identifies the larger 4.7-liter engine.  At some point in the car’s history, an upgrade was completed to an authentic and correct 4.9-liter engine from a later Indy. Never needing a full restoration, this car has been taken care of by a passionate collector, who worked hard to keep it well sorted, correctly maintained and attractive. Presented in its original and very attractive color scheme of Azzurro Hyperion light metallic blue with black leather, the paint quality is very good, with straight panels and nice chrome throughout. The interior is beautiful and correct, including the black leather covering the seats, door panels and console, and the original headliner and early Indy ‘twin binnacle’ style dashboard.  The drilled three-spoke aluminum steering wheel with wood rim and a wood gearshift knob are equally well preserved.  The full complement of gauges includes a km/h speedometer.  The engine compartment is clean and nicely detailed, and the car runs and performs great. Original and correct Borrani alloy wheels are mounted with Pirelli tires. A total of only 1,104 Maserati Indy Coupes were produced between 1969 and 1975, with just 300 of those originally equipped with the big 4.9-liter engine and updates.  This is simply a fabulous Maserati that is begging to be let loose on a road trip. It is well sorted and ready for touring and events, but has been prepared to a level that makes it suitable for the occasional show as well. .

    Last update: 20 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1946 Buick Roadmaster Sedanet

    $79,500(£64,975.35)

    Buick’s flagship Roadmaster has long been synonymous with luxury and style. Since its inception in 1936, it served as the style and feature leader in the Buick line, and from 41-on, was Buick’s premier offering. It was a ready competitor for Cadillac in terms of performance and equipment, yet the Buick undercut its sibling by a significant price margin. In late 1941, for the upcoming 1942 model year, Buick had significantly redesigned its entire range and the Roadmaster would provide a showcase of Harley Earl’s vision for the 1940s; a modern machine that was lower, wider and longer than its predecessor, with beautifully integrated fenders and a signature toothy grille. Of course, the American involvement in World War II put an abrupt end to automobile production in 1942, so only a minute handful of cars were delivered before production shifted to military vehicles. Eager buyers would have to wait at least three years before they’d see another new car roll out of an American plant. Few of those eager buyers waited longer for their new Buick Roadmaster than Erhardt H. Kraft of New Braunfels, Texas. As Mr. Kraft explained in a letter written to a subsequent owner of his Buick Roadmaster, he placed an order and a deposit with the Krueger Motor Company in 1941 for a new 1942 model, only to have the onset of World War II delay delivery, as the Buick production plant was rapidly converted to war production. Over four years had passed when, on Christmas Eve 1945, Mr. Kraft received a call from Krueger Motor Company informing him that his “new car had arrived at long last,” and that the unusually patient New Braunfels businessman had actually received interest on his deposit over that time! Mr. Kraft was no doubt surprised since, over the course of the war, he had completely forgotten that he ordered a new Buick in 1941! The story continues with Erhardt Kraft explaining: “Mr. Krueger asked if he could keep the car on his showroom floor, because it was Christmas Eve of 1945 and my Buick was the first Roadmaster the company had received since the War ended. He wanted others to enjoy the car since there had not been any fine cars like this for the length of the War. I drove the car home on January 2, 1946, for the first time.” How wonderful it is to imagine seeing this incredibly stylish, beautifully appointed 1946 Buick Sedanet right at the turn of the New Year for the first time, and after so many years of war. Mr. Kraft reportedly bought the car for his wife, but she never learned to drive, so it was only her husband who drove it on the occasional vacations and to church on Sundays. As such, it accrued very few miles and remained in outstanding condition. It was eventually acquired several decades later by Texas collector David Taylor, who is well-known among enthusiasts for collecting excellent original Buicks of this era. Subsequently, it was part of several well-known Southwestern collections, including the museum of Sterling McCall in Round Top, Texas. Thankfully, each subsequent owner appreciated this fine Buick’s originality and cared for it lovingly, and it shows a mere 4,734 miles from new. Today, this stunningly low mileage and original example presents in wonderful condition, wearing and older repaint in its original black and having benefitted from some replating of the original chrome. The sumptuous Harley Earl-penned Roadmaster Sedanet is one of the most desirable body styles of the period. It masterfully combines luxurious, sweeping curves with an air of sportiness in the tapered tail and low roofline. Highly desirable period accessories include a sun visor, dual outside mirrors, a spot light, and a light bar with twin fog lamps. On the road the car sits proudly as it should; riding on a set of wide whitewall tires with proper original hubcaps. Incredibly, this Roadmaster retains its fine original upholstery, which presents in very good condition, as well as its original window glass, aforementioned accessories and even the factory exhaust system and muffler! The dashboard is particularly magnificent, with a warm and inviting patina to its finishes, outstanding original instruments, and finely detailed original knobs, switches and steering wheel. Beneath the signature side-hinged hood is the original 320 Cubic Inch “Fireball” valve-in-head inline eight-cylinder that produced 144hp in period. Given the fact that the 4,734 miles are strongly believed to be original, it likely she still makes fairly close to that figure. The engine also looks wonderful, presented in correct original Buick Blue with the bold “FIREBALL” graphics on the valve cover. Some hoses, clamps and fittings have been changed over the years in the interest of functionality, but the overall appearance is that of a well maintained and highly original example. Mr. and Mrs. Kraft’s wonderful Roadmaster is an excellent choice for the connoisseur of originality. This car boasts rich and entertaining history and careful long-term maintenance in significant collections. It would be a wonderful exhibit for the AACA’s Historic Preservation of Original Features class, and we’re certain it would be as enjoyable to drive today as it was on the just the second day of 1946 in New Braunfels, Texas.

    Last update: 22 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1910 Cretors Model D Horse Drawn Popcorn Wagon

    $68,500(£55,985.05)

    In 1885 Charles Cretors set out to build an improved peanut roaster. At the time, the process was done by hand which lead to uneven roasting and inconsistencies in the finished product. Cretors moved to Chicago where he met traveling salesman J.M. Savage who convinced him there was a market for this type of invention. In 1893 Cretors, had finally completed and patented what was the first automated popcorn machine. The machine was steam-powered and popped corn in oil and seasoning, doing so evenly which gave customers a much more consistent experience. That same year Cretors set up a hand-drawn cart at the Chicago Columbian Exposition. It drew large crowds many of which were curious to whiteness the operation of his impressive machine as well as experience the deliciousness of the products it produced. From there the business grew, and Cretors expanded his concession business to other products. In changing with the times Cretors later produced horse-drawn concession stands and with the advent of the automobile even concession trucks. Cretors had an excellent knack for product promotion. His stands, wagons, and trucks were all painted in a similar fashion typically red, featuring distinctive gold leaf lettering. Also consistent with all of the Cretors concession stands was the prominent display of the machines which provided the delicious snacks, giving customers an insight to the process. The company remains in business today, a testament to five generations of family ownership and a successfull product line that has continued to adapt to changes in the concession market. This 1910 Cretors Model D Horse-Drawn Popcorn Wagon has been beautifully restored to its current condition. If features the iconic Cretors vending design with bright red paint, gold leaf lettering, red and white stripe awnings, beautiful woodwork, and bevel-edged glass throughout – giving customers a unique glimpse into the popcorn making process. The wagon features solid front and rear axles, a fully elliptical front leaf spring suspension as well as longitudinal semi-elliptical rear leaf springs all of which are finished in a bright yellow. The wagon rides on solid rubber tires mounted on wood-spoke wheels once again finished in bright yellow but also featuring red pinstriping. The bright yellow chassis and wheels beautifully accent the red bodywork of the wagon. While the wagon has been restored to an excellent period appearance, it has been updated with a modern electric popcorn popper for easier use. The wagon does retain a genuine Cretors No. 2 oscillating steam engine, prominently displayed behind a window next to the counter. This unique 1910 Cretors Model D Horse-Drawn Popcorn Wagon is a true time capsule, taking you back to the turn of the 20th century and the dawn of the concession business.

    Last update: 29 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1931 Cadillac V-16 All Weather Phaeton

    $425,000(£347,352.50)

    General Motors was riding a wave of success in the late 1920s. Cadillac was enjoying brisk sales thanks to the volume-leading V8 models and the new junior LaSalle brand was performing well in the showroom, thanks in large part to the work of one Harley Earl, widely considered to be the father of American car styling. Around this time, Harley Earl and Cadillac boss Larry Fisher toured Europe, visiting the storied traditional coachbuilders in England and France such as Barker, James Young, Saoutchik, and Vanvooren in search of inspiration for a new Cadillac flagship. But instead of building bare chassis and employing traditional body builders, Cadillac would offer a full catalog of coachbuilt bodies that they would sell as complete cars. To accomplish this, GM had previously purchased both Fisher Body and Fleetwood Metal Body to essentially have full control of its own in-house coachbuilders and was fully capable of offering a complete range of custom, semi-custom and catalog bodies. Cadillac was on the verge of unveiling a new halo model that they hoped would stamp their authority on the luxury automobile market and to do so, they needed the most stylish bodywork they could offer. In 1930, just after the stock market crash, Cadillac unveiled the breathtaking “multi-cylinder” engines. A V12 appeared alongside a headline-grabbing V16. The extravagant V16 was an immediate sensation and production began in earnest with demand strong, even on the verge of the Great Depression. The 452 cubic inch V16 made an astounding 175 horsepower in combination with turbine-like smoothness and refinement. Nearly one hundred body and chassis combinations were possible thanks to the resources of Fisher and Fleetwood, which ensure exclusivity, a must for the type of clientele Cadillac sought. Sales were very strong for 1930, but tapered off dramatically in subsequent years. It is widely believed that GM lost money on every V16 they build through 1940. Today, the Cadillac V16 remains one of the most desirable and collectible motorcars of the classic era. This 1931 Cadillac model 452A V16 All-Weather Phaeton is a magnificently restored example of the king of the multi-cylinder classics. Wearing fantastic coachwork by Fleetwood, it is finished in the striking color combination of a rose main body over dark red fenders, wheels and swage lines. It is a truly breathtaking example, restored to a world-class standard by the renowned Alan Taylor Co. Inc. It was subsequently shown at Pebble Beach in 2003 and benefiting from light use and exceptional care, it remains in stunning condition to this day. It still wears its original Fleetwood body (per the included build sheet) and is presented in the same specification as it left the factory in 1931. The body features many interesting details, such as a split, opening “Pennsylvania windshield” (named such as it was a signature of the Fleetwood Body Works) and a glass division between driver and passenger compartments. It is also fitted with dual sidemount spares topped with correct Cadillac mirrors, twin Pilot Ray spotlamps, radiator stone shield, goddess mascot and a matching dark-red colored trunk that has been restored to the same exceptional standard as the rest of the car. Wheels are painted red and highlighted with polished stainless spokes for a gorgeous effect. Paint, chrome and finishes remain in impeccable condition, virtually every bit as beautiful as it was when first presented at Pebble Beach. The lavish, early art-deco styled cabin is trimmed in tan leather covering the seats and door panels, accented with brown carpets. Interior soft trim exhibits virtually no wear, particularly considering the restoration was completed over a decade ago. Engine turned alloy trim accents the dash, another signature of Fleetwood cars. The tan top is similarly excellent, and remains fully functional. Of course, this being an All-Weather Phaeton, passengers are treated to full glass side windows and a well-sealed top. During fair weather, the top, side glass, and thin B-pillars lower to reveal a handsome and elegant machine with a separate rear windscreen to keep passengers comfortable during high-speed open runs. As one would expect from an Alan Taylor restoration, the engine bay is exquisitely detailed using concours-correct finishes, fittings and hardware. Likewise, it all functions beautifully and the performance is outstanding. The Cadillac Sixteen is one of America’s finest motorcars, and this example is surely one of the very best available today. The unique color combination suits the style of the era and the quality of the restoration is beyond reproach. It is of course ideally suited for show, yet has been restored and prepared to a standard that make it reliable and usable for touring. This is a rare opportunity to acquire an utterly gorgeous Cadillac that embodies the slogan, “The Standard of the World”.

    Last update: 27 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1932 Cadillac V-16 Special Phaeton

    $395,000(£322,833.50)

    In 1930, Cadillac stunned the automotive world with the introduction of its breathtaking new sixteen-cylinder models. Sales of the V8 and entry-level LaSalle models were strong in spite of economic hardships, and Cadillac was determined to show its competitors that it was, indeed the Standard of the World. Instantly, the V12 and especially the V16 models catapulted Cadillac to the top of the luxury class. An extraordinary array of coachwork options was available to satisfy the most discriminating buyer, and everything from the body to the engine bay was designed with beauty and elegance. The V12 and V16 engines shared many common components, but it was the V16 with its turbine like smoothness and unprecedented 175 horsepower output that grabbed the headlines. Subtle changes were made for the 1932 models which included a longer wheelbase, new carburetors, a mechanical fuel pump, heavier axles and larger brakes. Also new for 1932 were adjustable shock absorbers operated from the dashboard to further tune the ride to satisfy passengers. All Cadillac transmissions were fitted with quiet operating helical-gear transmissions, eliminating the whine and crash of a straight-cut gearbox. 1932 marked the first time a series of Fisher bodies became available on the Sixteen. These included sedans, coupes, a roadster, a convertible coupe and three open phaetons. In fact, these were the only phaetons available on the Sixteen, and just six were built, a single standard phaeton with no division, two sport phaetons with a long rear cowl and passenger windshield, and three special phaetons with the short rear cowl. As for Fleetwood bodies, the range was curtailed somewhat. The 30 choices offered in 1930-31 had been reduced to 21, sedans, cabriolets, limousines and a single convertible coupe. The 1931 experience had no doubt tempered Cadillac’s expectations, and history validated the wisdom. At year’s end, just 296 Sixteens had been sold versus 1,709 V12s. This V16 chassis began life wearing a formal sedan body which, when acquired by Bill Hatch of Chicago was in a rough state. The formal sedan body was beyond repair, so another body was sourced – this handsome Special Phaeton, which was originally fitted to V12 chassis 1301344, is nonetheless period appropriate and extremely handsome. The body, finished in light metallic blue with dark blue fenders and swage line, is a spectacular Fisher design that wears much of its original sheetmetal, thanks to a careful restoration. The paintwork remains in very good order, wearing the years since its restoration extremely well. The fit and finish are extremely nice, and the chrome is largely in very good order. It is lavishly detailed with a proper 1932 Cadillac Goddess mascot, chromed hood vents, twin long-trumpet horns, and dual sidemount spares with painted covers. It has been recently treated to a fresh set of blackwall tires that impart a magnificent sporty look when combined with the navy blue wheels and polished stainless spokes.This fine example is also a previous AACA National First Prize winner. Like the exterior, the interior is fabulously detailed and very well presented, showing little use on the restoration. Blue leather on the seats appears virtually unworn, and the excellent carpeting and door panels are accented with exquisite woodwork on the dash, door caps and rear passenger fascia. The original AC speedometer reads 120 mph – which must have seemed astonishing in 1932. A Jaeger eight-day clock keeps time, and the instrumentation is replicated in the rear for passengers to keep an eye should the driver be having too much fun exploiting all of that power. In spite of the fact that there are some years on the restoration, this Cadillac still looks remarkably fresh. The previous owner was a skilled mechanic who ensured it was maintained in excellent mechanical order and it remains ready to enjoy on the road. The engine compartment is clean and well detailed, with mainly correct finishes and fittings, with just a few areas showing signs of regular use. An AACA National First prize winner, it also runs and drives extremely well and should offer its next owner a thrilling and rewarding ownership experience.

    Last update: 17 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1958 Chevrolet Corvette Roadster

    $139,500(£114,013.35)

    In the late 1950s, California-based hot rod shop Barris Kustoms was beginning to make waves in the custom car world. George Barris had been tweaking, customizing and restyling cars since early in the decade. After moving to Los Angeles to start his own shop, George and his brother Sam pioneered many of the techniques and styles that set the standard for the hot rodding world in the coming years. Along with other pro builders like Ed Roth, Dean Jeffries, Gene Winfield, the Barris Brothers helped to establish hot-rodding in mainstream American culture. Barris had been building cars for private clients since his high-school days. By the time Barris Kustoms was in full swing, they were getting commissions from television and film stars, musicians and Hollywood studios. In the mid-1960s, George was approached by Accessories International to build them a promotional vehicle that would be a show stopper used to highlight their parts. Accessories International supplied various bolt-on accessories such as wheel spinners, regulator covers and valve-cover dress up kits. Many Accessories International parts were sold with Barris Kustoms branding. For their promotional vehicle, they chose a 1958 Corvette that was purchased new by the company and handed it over to Barris to work his magic. George set to work heavily modifying the Corvette, using Bill Mitchell’s XP 700 as a source of inspiration. The GM XP 700 was a 1958 Corvette that was reworked by Mitchell (the Head of GM Styling from 1958-1977) as a GM Dream Car, which he also used as a daily driver for the first year of its life. The XP 700 had a pronounced, extended grille and double-headlight pods in the front, deeply sculpted side coves and lots of sweeps highlighted by crisp feature lines. It was revised in 1959, when Mitchell added a plexiglass bubble top that had been sprayed with vaporized aluminum to reflect the heat of the sun. The XP 700 was pilfered to make the XP 755 “Mako Shark” in 1961 which still survives to this day, though the XP 700 body has long since been destroyed. For Barris’ work on the Accessories International Corvette, he began with a dramatic restyling of the front end, extending the quad headlights outward on more pronounced “pods”. The grille drew directly from the XP 700, featuring a dramatic oval shaped affair with integrated side scoops. An additional hood scoop fed air to the carburetor, and the signature 1958 ‘Vette hood louvers and trim were smoothed out. In the rear, the heavy chrome trim was removed and smoothed, and sharp pronounced Jet Age fins were grafted to the tops of the quarters. A 1958 Impala roof vent was grafted into the hard top. The car was then painted in a lurid blue with silver coves and a silver painted hard top, again mimicking the aluminum-hued Plexiglas top on the original XP 700. It was then fitted with the whole range of Accessories International parts, from the wheels on up, and was soon touring the country, as the poster-child for AI accessories at custom car shows, trade shows and other special events. Today, the Barris Kustoms 1958 Corvette presents in very good condition with the original Barris modifications and AI parts still largely intact. It is a super cool and highly authentic period piece, down to the AAA whitewall bias ply tires mounted on genuine Ansen magnesium wheels outfitted with Accessories International spinners. The drivetrain consists of a 1960’s period 327/four-barrel mated to a four-speed manual ‘box with Hurst shifter. The cabin is also highly original, with black upholstered seats and a period wood-rimmed Grant steering wheel. All in, this is an interesting and totally unique piece of Kustom Car history that presents in very original, very well-preserved condition. Genuine Barris Kustoms cars are highly collectible pieces of Americana, and this particular car’s unique history and array of period parts add yet more layers of desirability. This 1958 Corvette is sure to be a hit at vintage hot-rod events, Good Guys cruises or any gathering of Kustom Kulture enthusiasts.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1925 Lincoln Model L Convertible Coupe

    $115,000(£93,989.50)

    Henry M. Leland may not be a household name in the same way that Henry Ford is, but his influence on the American automotive landscape is no less important and far reaching. A machinist and inventor who learned tool making in the firearms industry, he was at the leading edge of automobile development at the turn of the 20th century. During his time running the Leland and Faulconer he supplied engines for Ransom E. Olds. He also, incidentally, invented the electric barber’s clipper! In 1902, Leland was brought in to the Henry Ford Company to appraise their assets prior to liquidation. Leland complied but suggested they reorganize and build a car based on an engine Leland supplied to Olds. The new company was called Cadillac and they set to work building some of the finest early motorcars available. Leland applied many of the lessons he learned in the firearms business to the automobile, most importantly, the use of interchangeable parts. Leland sold Cadillac to General Motors in 1909, but remained in charge. He headed the development of the electric self-starter alongside Charles Kettering in 1912. A dispute over the production of Liberty Aircraft engines led to his departure from Cadillac in 1916, and his subsequent founding of another great American luxury marque – Lincoln. The Model L was Henry Leland’s first model since he formed Lincoln Motor Company following his contentious departure from Cadillac. Introduced in 1917, the Model L was designed by Leland’s son-in-law, Angus Woodbridge who, curiously, was trained as a ladies hat maker. In spite of Mr. Woodbridge’s unconventional training, the Model L was a fine car, if perhaps viewed as a bit old-fashioned in its day. Financial troubles hit the company hard during the post WWI recession, and in 1922 Leland sold Lincoln to Henry Ford for $8 million. Ford immediately displaced Leland and Woodbridge, and assigned his own son Edsel to head the new division. Edsel, unlike his father, understood the importance of style on a high end automobile and he designed a new body for the L-series, and improved handling with the addition of hydraulic shock absorbers. They also streamlined the production process, saving vast amounts of money and turning Lincoln into a profitable business in less than a year. By 1925, the robust L-Series was restyled again with a new nickel-plated radiator shell. The 90 horsepower V8 and three-speed transmission remained and the car sold well, offered in a variety of body styles. Our featured example is from 1925 and is dressed in a rare and attractive convertible coupe body by LeBaron. It is finished in a unique tri-tone scheme, with medium khaki body sides, darker hood and accent lines, and black fenders and swage lines. The colors are accented with red pinstripes and red wire wheels, giving a fun and sporting appearance. This Model-L wears a very well preserved older restoration featuring an array of fantastic period accessories. Body lines are very good, and the high quality LeBaron convertible coupe body exhibits excellent fit and finish for the period, however the paint is just starting to show some age. Starting at the front end, it wears nickel plated Drum headlights, a badge bar-mounted drum spot light, and a very rare OWL accessory light mounted high on the radiator shell. Whoever the heroic original owner was in 1925 must have enjoyed high-speed motoring at night! Atop the nicely restored radiator sits the famous Lincoln Greyhound mascot. Moving back, you find drum cowl lights, dual sidemount spare tires with mirrors, an opening windscreen and body side golf-bag door. Rumble seat passengers are treated to their own folding windshield to ensure their comfort and a covered trunk sits out back on a folding rack. The LeBaron designed body is very stylish and well-proportioned with a long, tapering rear deck and it wears the accessories well without appearing overwrought. The cozy cockpit is trimmed in period appropriate cloth which presents in good condition, showing little wear since the restoration was completed. Wood on the dash, door caps and steering wheel are all in good order and the original instrumentation is all intact and attractive. The rumble seat is trimmed in brown leather, which would be correct for the period, as it was harder wearing and more likely to see weather. The flat head 90 horsepower V8 engine is very nicely presented in correct gray paint on the heads and cylinders. Polished hardware, correct clamps and painted accessories round out the detailing. The engine is mated to a 3-speed manual gearbox which is strong and easy to operate. With lots of interesting accessories, a very rare and desirable LeBaron body and a quality restoration that has been very well maintained, this Lincoln L is sure to charm its next owner.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1954 Oldsmobile 88 Custom

    $139,500(£114,013.35)

    For nearly as long as there have been automobiles, there have been people customizing them to suit their own personal style. From basic accessories to make motoring more enjoyable and safe, to today’s sophisticated tuning and restyling firms, the automobile has long been a canvas for self-expression. Customizing cars is a universal language, and people around the world are always working to make their machine faster, stronger or a unique expression of their taste. America’s obsessive car culture has spawned a vast array of styles and trends, the most distinctive and influential were the hot rod set that began building cheap Ford roadsters in the 1940s and 50s. The hot rod has taken on countless forms over the years, ranging from the early days of dry-lakes roadsters and drag cars, to the wild, boundary pushing “Kustoms” of the 1960s. From the late 50’s onward, car builders experimented with radical restyling of existing cars. Starting mostly with 2-door 1940s and 1950s American coupes, the suspension would be lowered, body lines smoothed, roof chopped, bodies dropped over the frame and any variety of different head and tail lights grafted onto the body. As the 1960s wore on, custom car builders were driven by creativity, competition, and quite possibly nitrocellulose lacquer paint fumes. One such example of the height of the Kustom movement is “Joanne’s Dream”. This remarkable automobile started life as a 1954 Oldsmobile Super 88 coupe and was completely transformed in period. Before its radical transformation, this Olds was used as a daily driver in the early 1960s while in the possession of Tom and Joanne Archer. It was Joanne’s dream to build a custom show car and the Olds served as the perfect staring point. Rather than simply applying a lick of paint and some pin stripes, Tom went completely nuts and transformed the 54 Olds into a totally unique and truly individual kustom car. Barely recognizable as the donor Super 88, the now-fully restored machine features a unique roof line and a handmade El Camino-style pickup bed. Starting at the front end, the modified 55 DeSoto grille is the first thing you notice, along with the quad headlights which were lifted from a 1957 Plymouth and grafted into the Olds fenders. The original hood was stamped with louvers and smoothed to be free of trim and badges. Corvette-inspired coves behind the front and rear wheel arches were custom made and fitted to the body and 1959 Plymouth Belvedere trim graces the body sides. The roof line was of course heavily chopped and 1961 Corvair air ducts were integrated into it. In the rear, the wild looking custom bed features red oak planks in the floor, 1958 Corvette taillights in the top of the fenders, and 1963 Impala tail lights below. Six (count ‘em!) exhausts exit from the rear, through side mounted lake pipes, and through stacks cut in the bed just behind the cab. The detailing is simply astounding and everywhere you look you find bits and pieces that were lifted from other cars and seamlessly integrated into this incredible piece. Under the louvered hood is the original 371 Rocket 88 Olds engine, which was dressed with a number of speed parts. A Weiland dual-quad intake, Offenhauser finned alloy valve covers adorn the engine, and accessories such as the power steering reservoir, generator, pulleys and heater motor have been chrome plated. Joanne’s Dream was discovered in 2008 as a hulk sitting behind a Fort Worth, TX hot rod shop. Alan Lewenthal had never seen anything like it, and soon began to discover this was a rare survivor from the golden age of the Kustom car scene. Following extensive research, a painstaking restoration was handled by Marquis Auto Restorations of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Restoring a custom car of this type required specialized skills and knowledge, and the countless bits of trim and detailing that were sourced from other cars had to be identified. Traditional methods such as lead filler were used to restore the body to its former glory and it now presents in truly stunning condition, finished in its original lurid purple over white paint scheme, and period correct reverse chrome wheels. 1962 Impala bucket seats are trimmed in white upholstery as is the Impala center console (with unique shift lever) and custom rolled dash pad. Even the bed sides are trimmed in matching white vinyl. The entire restoration carefully returned this car to the show quality standard it enjoyed when it was a star on the auto-show circuit in the mid-1960s. National Geographic produced a documentary for their program Dream Car Archaeology which followed the restoration process, and in January 2009 at the Chicago World of Wheels show, the car was awarded a prestigious George Barris Elegance Award, a Best In Class and a named Most Outstanding Radical Custom Hardtop. We can’t imagine what Joanne’s reaction was when she first saw her Olds Super 88 fully transformed. But we’d like to believe it was a dream come true.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1927 Cadillac Series 314 Double Cowl Sport Phaeton

    $195,000(£159,373.50)

    Cadillac had long established its reputation as a leader for innovation and quality in the luxury car market by the 1920s. The long-running and fierce battle with Packard for sales supremacy meant Cadillac engineers were constantly striving for new ideas to refine and enhance their vehicles. As the decade drew to a close, Cadillac was highly motivated to retake their standing at the top of the sales charts from their cross-town rivals. The introduction of the junior LaSalle brand in 1927 helped greatly in their quest, and was intended to complement the senior models, which in 1927 consisted of the Model 314 V8 series. A dizzying array of body styles were offered, from the standard Cadillac bodies, to the Custom lines from both Fisher and Fleetwood. We are very pleased to offer this truly stunning 1927 Model 314 wearing a Double Cowl Sport Phaeton body from the Fisher Body Custom line.  It is presented in magnificent colors; the all-black body and fenders accented with a simple but bold red inlay and subtle cream-colored coach lines. The combination is breathtaking, and the quality of the restoration equally impressive. This highly desirable and stylish 314 was treated to a comprehensive, concours-quality restoration and has seen only light use since completion. It has been shown and obsessively well cared-for, remaining in impeccable condition. The black paint is beautifully applied over laser straight panels, and the extensive brightwork and detailing are in beautiful condition. It is fitted with drum headlights, very rare dual, drum-style Pilot-ray spot lamps, drum cowl lamps, Cadillac mirrors mounted on dual-sidemount spares, and the first known Cadillac radiator mascot – a herald in Cadillac regalia, proudly trumpeting the praises of the marque. In the rear is found a painted trunk rack with a fantastic period trunk and black canvas cover. This is an extremely handsome body that looks elegant with the top up or down, though we are particularly fond of the sporting attitude it takes on with the top down and both windscreens folded flat. Occupants are treated to a gorgeous red interior that matches the red flash on the bodywork. Gray carpeting bound in red provides a bit of subtle contrast. The leather upholstery is simply exquisite, showing little signs of use and virtually no creasing. There is a beautifully finished wood-rimmed steering wheel perched atop a chromed steering column, and complemented by a matching wood gear knob. The highlight of the interior, however has to be the instrument panel; a stunningly ornate affair with a wood fascia surrounded by gorgeous gold inlay. The instruments themselves are fully restored, and the Cadillac crest is proudly inlaid in gold. Rear passengers are treated to their own cowl and windscreen for comfort and weather protection, as well as courtesy lights and a storage compartment built into the rear of the front seat. The engine, drivetrain and chassis are all detailed to concours standards, the quality of the restoration backed by a CCCA Senior Award badge earned in 2005. This fabulous Cadillac has been the proud showpiece of a dedicated marque enthusiast who has bestowed upon it years of care. We love the Harley Earl styling the breathtaking Fleetwood detailing, and would proudly use this handsome, desirable and rare Cadillac for show or touring. This is a very worthy addition to virtually any collection.

    Last update: 22 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1929 Stutz Blackhawk Roadster

    $137,500(£112,378.75)

    Harry C Stutz is one of the great automotive pioneers who may be considered among the greats such as Ettore Bugatti, Harry Miller and the Duesenberg Brothers. A farm boy from Ohio with a natural gift and fascination with machinery, Stutz earned a local reputation as the boy who could fix anything. He left his home at 18 to pursue a career in engineering and quickly made a name for himself in industry as an innovative, creative perfectionist. One of his first forays into automobile manufacture was the design of an engine for the American Motor Car Company’s Underslung model. Harry Stutz soon left American to form his own company, the Ideal Motor Company, in 1911. Right from the start, Stutz saw the importance of marketing his automobiles through racing – in fact, the very first car that left the Indianapolis plant was delivered straight to the track to compete in the Indianapolis 500 mile race! That car finished 11th, suffering no mechanical issues or failures. It earned the slogan “The car that made good in a day”. Quite! One year later, the business was renamed Stutz Motor Company. Stutz was respected by his employees, but they knew that if a single tool was left out of place or a work bench was left untidy after closing, they would hear about it the next day. They strove to build the best automobiles they could and their efforts paid off on race tracks around the world. The Stutz was seen as one of the finest cars money could buy. In 1919, facing a need to raise capital to fund production, he sold a portion of his business, but quickly grew disgusted with his lack of control over the operations and he soon departed. Following a stock scandal, bankruptcy and another change of ownership, Stutz Motor Company executives struck gold when they hired an equally gifted engineer by the name of Frederic Moscovics. Moscovics quickly refocused the floundering company and developed the “Safety Stutz” chassis for 1926. His new chassis had a double drop that gave a low center of gravity, excellent handling and stability as well as a rakish look. Four wheel hydraulic brakes were fitted as well as a worm-drive rear axle. The new “Vertical Eight” was single overhead camshaft affair driven by a link-belt chain, with twin-plug ignition.  In 1927 a Vertical Eight-equipped model AA set a 24 hour speed record, averaging 68 mph over 24 hours – it was a test that proved its worth in 1928 when a Stutz finished 2nd to the Bentley Boys at the 24 Hours of LeMans. Sales at home remained sluggish, however, so Stutz spun off its sporty junior models into a new range called “Black Hawk” in late 1928 in an effort to boost sales. But like Harry Stutz before him, Moscovics was reluctant to cheapen his cars. A six-cylinder version of the Vertical Eight sat inside an all-new, short wheelbase frame, its 127" chassis being a marked improvement over the eight-cylinder model's frame and featuring substantial cross-bracing. A marvel of design and technically worlds ahead of the competition, the frame remained the low-slung, double-drop design as before. Engine power drove through a four-speed transmission making Black Hawk one of only two US manufacturers at the time to have this feature. Braking was by large Lockheed hydraulic drums on all four wheels, and a B&K vacuum booster as seen on Duesenberg and Stutz Eight models was offered as an option. All this proved too little too late however, and Stutz struggled against a failing economy and buyers who simply did not appreciate the sophisticated European design. By 1935 the doors were shut for good. Black Hawks were only in production for a few short years, making them quite rare and highly desirable today. This extremely handsome example wears a rumble-seat roadster body, believed to be penned by LeBaron, who allegedly designed and built many catalog Black Hawk bodies. The handsome coachwork is in fine condition, having been treated to a very high quality restoration some years back and used sparingly since. The restoration was fully documented via a binder of photos which is included in the sale. It is finished in a lovely light green with contrasting black fenders and accented with dark green wire wheels. The paint is attractive and in good order, and panel fit is very good all around. Typical high quality detailing includes dual tail lights, step pads for the rumble seat, chrome mirrors, cowl lamps, trunk rack and a folding windscreen. The cabin and rumble seat are trimmed in tan upholstery which still presents very well thanks to the light use and careful maintenance. The canvas top is in similarly good order and features a full complement of side curtains and a top boot. Moscovics’ incredible overhead cam engine presents well beneath the hood, showing signs of use but also maintenance and care. This is a very finely restored car that remains quite attractive for both collectors and driving enthusiasts. We feel this Black Hawk would be an outstanding tour car thanks to its superlative overhead cam engine, four-speed gearbox and world-class chassis. Few American cars could compete with the level of performance and driveability the Stutz Black Hawk offered in period and this is an excellent opportunity to experience that performance today.   .

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1952 Bentley Mark VI Drop Head Coupe

    $159,500(£130,359.35)

    Introduced in 1946, the MkVI was Bentley’s the first postwar production car. This new car marked a major landmark and turning point for Bentley, as it was the first in the company’s history to be offered as a complete car with a standardized production body, built in house. Known as the Standard Steel Saloon, the panels were built by Pressed Steel Ltd, and assembled at the newly integrated Rolls Royce works in Crewe. While the practice of ordering custom coachbuilt bodies was falling out of favor and many of the traditional British firms were closing up shop, it was still possible to order a MkVI with a custom body from any number of builders such as Freestone and Webb, Radford, H.J. Mulliner and Park Ward. But the vast majority of customers opted for the elegant and handsome Standard Steel Saloon body, which helped make the MkVI Bentley’s most successful model to date. Mechanically, it was similar to the pre-war MkV, with independent front suspension on the substantial chassis and a 4.25 liter inline six. For the 1952 model year, it was updated to the “big bore” 4.5 liter specification and available with either an automatic or four-speed manual gearbox. When properly maintained, the MkVI is a reliable and robust motorcar with that exhibits the delightful over-engineered feeling of a classic Bentley. 4,946 examples were produced, the vast majority of which were sold with Standard Steel Saloon bodies. Yet a fraction of production did receive special coachwork, as our featured example wears. From its foundation in 1919, Park Ward had maintained a very close relationship with Bentley. So much so, that in 1931 Bentley had planned a takeover of the coachbuilding firm, before Rolls Royce stepped in and took over Bentley. Park Ward coachwork has graced virtually every chassis made by Bentley, from the earliest 3-liter cars, through the 1990s when the name was used to denote specially equipped and limited edition models. For the MkVI, Park Ward offered an elegant five-passenger Drophead Coupe body. The gorgeous, flowing lines were minimally adorned with just a few flashes of chrome trim. Typically Park Ward, the Drophead Coupe was elegant, refined and restrained yet still capable of making a bold statement. Just 27 of its kind were produced before MkVI production shifted to the R-Type, making it one of the rarest of the coachbuilt post-war Bentleys. Our fine example is a 1952 model, desirably configured in left-hand drive with four-speed manual transmission and the big-bore 4.5 liter engine. Just 8 cars were produced in this specification for 1952. B135LNY is finished in Sand over Sable with a tan top, and red coach stripes. The body is in very good order, straight and tidy with fair quality older paint that is attractive, yet showing some signs of use. It appears this Bentley has never had a full restoration, but rather, has been maintained and freshened as needed over the years. The result is a handsome and usable car with an appealing patina that encourages regular drives. Park Ward refined their design over the short production, so many of them wear different detailing, this example has full rear fender skirts that are cleverly hinged to access the wheels for service. A chrome strip follows the lower edge of the body, and repeats on the wheel skirt and the car looks equally appealing with the top up or folded. In the cabin, light tan leather is piped in brown and presents in good condition, with fair carpets and good detailing. Smiths instruments are correct and in good working order. The door panels are executed in a lovely sunburst pattern and beautifully restored wood trim graces the door caps, dash and windscreen surround. The wood trim is certainly a highlight of the interior, restored to a high standard with gorgeous inlay banding and a deep, rich gloss. This MkVI is mechanically sound having recently been treated to a full $29,000 worth of service from Crewe-certified master technicians at Bentley Denver. The engine bay is tidy though in driver-quality condition. This MkVI is quite suitable for driving and enjoyment and would make a fine companion for Bentley Driver’s Club events. Likewise, it would make a very fine and deserving candidate for a full restoration, as it is a very rare, desirable and collectible automobile built by one of the greatest coachbuilders of the period. It is sold with records of the recent maintenance, as well as original handbooks and RROC records.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1959 Facel-Vega HK500 Coupe

    $215,000(£175,719.50)

    Jean Daninos, the founder of Facel, believed that even in the 1950's France needed a prestigious, exclusive, fast, comfortable, beautiful, luxurious automobile to carry on the tradition of its great marques like Bugatti, Delahaye, Delage and Talbot-Lago. A successful tool maker and manufacturer with interests in a variety of metal-working enterprises, Daninos created the Facel Vega, the first, and still one of the greatest, European-American hybrids, to express his vision in metal. Daninos and his resident designer, Jacques Brasseur, created a robust but largely conventional chassis with independent front suspension and a live rear axle. To it was welded Brasseur's masterpiece, a low, smooth-sided body -- described by Michael Sedgwick as a 'pavilion' -- on which was placed a thin pillared coupe greenhouse with generous glass area. The interior, particularly the dashboard and instrument panel, was equally simple and eloquent with lever controls, big instruments and generous, comfortable front seats. To propel this beautiful vehicle Facel obtained big, long-legged V-8 engines from Chrysler in America. At introduction at the 1954 Paris Show this was a 276 cubic inch, 180 horsepower DeSoto Firedome, but it was soon supplanted by larger and more powerful Chrysler engines, eventually reaching 383 cubic inches in 1959. Production continued but Facel tried to create a smaller version, the Facellia, with a proprietary 1.6 liter twin cam four that proved to be difficult and drained the company's resources. Even a revised HK500, the Facel II, could not keep the company alive. The HK500 is the best of the Facels, and it was chosen by a litany of wealthy, famed and powerful owners including William A.M. Burden (great-grandson of Cornelius Vanderbilt and one-time owner of the Miller V-16 road car), Count Volpi (patron of Scuderia Serenissima), Danny Kaye, Stirling Moss, Tony Curtiss, Richard Starkey (better known as Ringo Starr), the King of Morocco and the first owner of this HK500, Arthur Christopher John Soames. Educated at Eton and Sandhurst, Soames served in World War II with the Coldstream Guards earning the Croix de Guerre in 1942. In 1947 he married Mary Churchill, youngest daughter of Sir Winston and Lady Spencer Churchill, turning to politics in the early 50's after his Army career and serving in a number of important posts including difficult assignments as Ambassador to France 1968-72 during a time of strained relations and in 1979-80 as the last British Governor of Rhodesia, negotiating the colony's transition into the nation of Zimbabwe. He bought this Facel Vega HK500 in 1959 while serving as the UK's Secretary of State for War in the Harold MacMillan government. His accomplishments earned him a lifetime peerage, Baron Soames of Fletching, in 1979. Christopher (as he preferred) Soames' Facel Vega is righthand drive and is marked by its engine, the powerful dual four-barrel carburetor 383 Chrysler of 350 or so horsepower, and 4-speed Pont-a- Mousson manual gearbox, the latter a rare and highly desirable option to the standard Chrysler Torqueflite automatic. The engine is correctly numbered FY7 for its Facel Vega application and has it correct air cleaner assemblies. It is equipped with power windows, power steering, European style headlights, Motorola solid state radio and has a set of new Borrani centerlock wire wheels with 3-ear Facel Vega nuts, another rare and desirable factory option. It was comprehensively restored in every detail in the 90's and comes from its second subsequent owner. The attention to detail in the bodywork, light yellow paint, oxblood leather upholstery and interior trim, engine compartment and trunk is exceptional. Facel Vegas are noted for their extensive use of stainless steel for exterior brightwork, even the bumpers, and the highly polished bright trim on this example is a delight to see. Soames was known as much for his sense of humor as for his size (contemporaries noted when he became ambassador to France that he was taller than Charles deGaulle) and his HK500's license plate proudly proclaims it to be 'Winston'. This is not only one of the best Facel Vega HK500s in existence, it also has the most desirable dual 4-barrel 383 engine, 4-speed manual gearbox and Borrani centerlock wire wheels. Its Christopher Soames provenance is the crowning feature on a singular automobile.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1933 Cadillac V-16 All Weather Phaeton

    $415,000(£339,179.50)

    “The Standard of the World” was not only Cadillac’s advertising slogan, but it was a doctrine for its engineers and designers to live by. During the 1930’s, the company went to great lengths to live up to that claim, building ever more exclusive and stylish models. Despite the economic hardships, the junior LaSalle brand and entry-level Cadillac V8 models were selling well, and some much-needed cash was swelling the coffers. Cadillac decided the time was right to add a bit of excitement to the “multi-cylinder” engine race that was going on between high-end manufacturers around the world. In 1930 they shocked the motoring world with introduction of both a V12 and an unprecedented V16 engine displacing 452 cubic inches. This put Cadillac right into the thick of the battle with such prestigious manufacturers as Hispano-Suiza, Lagonda, Rolls-Royce and their chief rival, Packard. Both engines were designed simultaneously by Cadillac engineer Owen Nacker, and they shared the same basic layout as well as many common components. The V12’s output was a healthy 135 horsepower, while the V16 put out a full 175 horsepower – a headline grabbing figure for its day. In 1933, a V16 Imperial Cabriolet started at $6,250 and stretched to a whopping $8,000 for the top line All Weather Phaeton. The starting price was a full $3,000 more than a comparable V12 model, keeping in mind that a 1933 Chevrolet cost $445. Of course, a whole range of custom and semi-custom bodies were available from within GM and outside coachbuilders. The Cadillac LaSalle Club has put the number at approximately seventy different combinations of chassis and body options, which undoubtedly allowed a high degree of exclusivity, considering just 125 of a planned 400 examples were built. The V16 Cadillac remains to this day one of the most collectible, exclusive and desirable of all American classics. Imposing, elegant and visually striking, this 1933 Cadillac Model 452C V16 All Weather Phaeton represents the most expensive and exclusive Cadillac offered at the time. Only eight cars were built in 1933 with this coachwork. Chassis 5000082 was originally equipped with a Fleetwood 5575-S sedan body.  The car was purchased by well-known collector Jack Passey in the 1950’s, and is mentioned in his book, For The Love Of Old Cars. Jack kept the car for 10 years or so, and sold it to a collector in New Jersey. He eventually purchased his beloved 1933 V16 back, and the car was later sold to Fred Weber in St Louis, Mo. The Weber’s had a large collection of V16 Cadillacs at the time, and were actively restoring and trading cars.  They sold 500082 to the McGowan brothers, who had acquired a 1932 Cadillac V16 with an original 1933 V16 All Weather Phaeton body from Dana Morgan in California.  When the car was restored, this original V16 body was mated to the chassis. This stunningly beautiful machine has been fully restored to world-class concours standards and remains in excellent order throughout. The incredible Fleetwood coachwork exhibits the early beginnings of streamline design, thanks to its fully-formed fenders, split and tapered radiator shell and Art-Deco inspired streaks and slashes. It is truly a work of art and absolutely breathtaking to behold. This example is finished in deep navy blue and fully accessorized to reflect its standing at the top of the range. At the front end, a fabulous quad-bar front bumper features polished strips and body-colored inserts. The badge bar wears a pair of Pilot Ray spot lamps and the horns are magnificent Deco pieces with concentric chrome inserts in the trumpets. The 1933 Cadillac is instantly recognizable thanks to the body-color split grille, which on this example is graced with a gold plated Cadillac emblem and goddess mascot. Dual sidemount spare wheels wear painted covers and the running boards are fitted with polished strips that accentuate the long, flowing lines, in true Art Deco fashion. In the rear is found a bustle back trunk along with a chrome trunk rack, dual tail lights, a repeating quad-bar bumper and correct dual-exhausts. The paintwork is executed to a magnificent standard and while this restoration was completed several years ago, it remains in impeccable order. Chrome trim and polished brightwork are likewise exquisite. Blue painted wheels wear full chrome wheel covers and whitewall tires, the smooth covers further enhancing the streamline styling. Opening the doors, you are treated to a complementary blue leather interior that is accented with exquisite inlaid wood trim. The leather is in excellent order, showing only the very slightest creasing from light use, just barely gaining a broken-in appearance. Gorgeous detailing adorns the dash with its textured inlays, engine-turned escutcheons and correct original instrumentation. Rear passengers are treated to a large leather chair with a folding armrest, individual cigar lighters and beautifully detailed ash trays. The tan canvas top is in excellent condition, and this being an all-weather phaeton, passengers are gifted with roll-up glass windows and a folding B-pillar to seal out the elements. It is difficult to determine whether the body or the engine is the star of this show. Opening the long bonnet reveals one of the most awe-inspiring engines of the era. The Cadillac V16 is a masterpiece of form following function. It is a piece of mechanical beauty. The narrow angle Vee is topped with black painted rocker covers accented with polished ribs. Virtually every nut, bolt, clamp and fastener is concours correct and precisely placed. This truly is a showpiece from top to bottom. Few automobiles of the era can compare with the 1933 Cadillac V16 for its presence and style. This remarkable automobile represents the very best that Cadillac – and America – had to offer in the period. It is a piece of art, history and engineering brilliance than can be shown or toured with pride.

    Last update: 19 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1928 Packard Eight Dual Windshield Phaeton

    $149,500(£122,186.35)

    Most enthusiasts will agree that Packard’s glory days began in earnest in the late 1920s and ran through the mid-1930s. During this time, the famed Detroit automaker was building some of the finest automobiles on the market, expanding its reputation around the world and supplying machines to moguls and Hollywood stars. The over-engineered nature of their chassis and engines earned them a reputation of exceptional reliability. Packard also offered a staggering array of body, chassis and engine combinations that could be tailored to suit virtually any client, providing they had the necessary funds. For the more discerning clientele with deeper pockets, a chassis could be fitted with a bespoke body by any one of twenty custom body builders at their disposal. Packards of this era were grand, yet elegantly restrained. They are considered by many to be the very finest automobiles of their time. The model 443 of 1928 was part of the Fourth Series and was one of the most impressive automobiles of its day. It rode on an immense 143” wheelbase regardless of body style, giving it a sense of presence that few could match. Motivation was courtesy of a nearly silent straight-eight that displaced 383 cubic inches, and produced an understressed 109 horsepower and a steady wave of torque. As with other Packards of this period, the 443 was not an intimidating car to drive thanks to the slick gearbox, powerful brakes and excellent road manners, and it was preferred by famous people the world over, including famous French aviator Dieudonne Costes and H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, among others. Our featured example is a 443 Eight dual-windshield Phaeton from 1928. This is an extremely well-preserved older restoration that performs well and presents in very attractive condition. The body is finished in a handsome combination of medium brown with dark brown beltline, black fenders and dark orange disc wheels and body accents. It’s a surprisingly attractive combination that sets this car apart from others. The signature Packard disc wheels are fitted with whitewall tires all around, including the dual sidemount spares. The styling is very sporting for a large car, particularly with the canvas top erected, which imparts a rakish and aggressive look, particularly in profile. Paint quality and body work are excellent on this quality restoration. The chrome and brightwork are in similarly excellent condition, showing deep shine and minimal flaws. The imposing Packard radiator shell is protected by a stainless steel stone guard, while windwings, cowl lamps, outside mirrors and a trunk rack round out the accessories. The gorgeous interior is trimmed in dark tan leather which finely complements the exterior paint colors. Being a dual-windshield Phaeton, rear passengers have their own adjustable windscreen with windwings to keep them comfortable and unruffled during a top-down blast. A past owner installed a set of handsome wooden cabinets behind the driver’s seat which appears to be the only deviation from originality in the cabin, and would make a rather nice drinks-cabinet to keep rear passengers even happier than they would already be. The wood dash and door caps are restored with deep gloss and the instruments presented beautifully in the center of the fascia. Certainly stylish and dapper, this Packard is also mechanically excellent, thanks to regular use and care since the restoration was completed. The 383 cubic inch inline eight cylinder starts readily and performance is excellent for a car of this size and stature. The grand 443 has a tendency to shrink around the driver once out on the road making them among the most enjoyable large classics to drive and extremely popular among touring enthusiasts. Thanks to the obvious care this example has received, it remains attractive enough for show. As a CCCA approved Full Classic, it would be extremely well-suited for CARavan Touring and a welcome addition to any collection of fine automobiles.    

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1942 Lincoln Continental Convertible

    $76,500(£62,523.45)

    Edsel Ford was the only son of Henry Ford, but the two men could not have been more different.  Edsel Ford was worldly, gifted with fine taste and a patron of the arts – including his many personally funded commissions that helped American coachbuilders survive the early years of the Great Depression.  It is an irony then that the automobile created to be a tribute to Edsel Ford instead became an embarrassment when it was introduced 14 years after Edsel’s early death in 1943, at the age of 49.  In his highly productive lifetime, Edsel Ford become president of Ford Motor Company and encouraged Ford’s purchase of the Lincoln Motor Company from the founding Lelands.  He persuaded his father to discontinue production of the Model T – the most successful car in the world at the time – and he led the development of the stylish Model A that was sometimes referred to as ‘a little Lincoln’.  He also created the first styling department at Ford in 1935, hiring E.T. ‘Bob’ Gregorie as styling director. The idea of for the Lincoln Continental came directly from Edsel Ford’s worldly view.  The story has been told many times that the younger Ford returned from a European trip struck with the coachwork he observed travelling on the Continent.  Ford tasked Bob Gregorie to create a custom coachbuilt automobile on a Lincoln Zephyr chassis with the clean, unadorned lines and minimal chrome trim of the European cars he admired.  The first Lincoln Continental prototype was shipped to Florida in March 1939, where Edsel Ford and his family wintered at Hobe Sound near Palm Beach.  Edsel Ford’s Continental-style Lincoln was greeted with rave reviews and questions about production from just the crowd he hoped to attract.  A second prototype was constructed for refinement and the Lincoln Continental went into production just six months later in October 1939 as a 1940 model. Like the first prototype, the Continental was constructed with the same 125- inch chassis as the Lincoln Zephyr.  The engine in the first production Continental was a 292 c.i. flathead V-12 producing 120 horsepower, with a three-speed column shifter.  The body was all new.  In comparison with the Zephyr, the driver’s seat was moved back, the hood was longer and both the roof and the side profile of the car were dramatically lowered.  The Cabriolet, like the prototypes, had closed rear roof quarters that visually stretched the length of the car together with the spare tire mounted at the rear of the car.   Interior trim featured a gold colored finish.  The extensively revised 1942 Lincoln Continental shared the Zephyr’s new styling format that was distinguished by a lower ride height and squared off fenders as well as the Zephyr’s wider, two-piece grille.  Engine size increased to 306 c.i. with 130 horsepower.  Like all of the industry, 1942 Lincoln production was cut short for the war effort and a total of only 1,236 1942 Lincolns were produced including just 136 Cabriolets. The automobile offered here is one of only a few 1942 Lincoln Continental Cabriolets that are thought to survive.  The subject of an older ground up restoration, the car presents beautifully today. Finished in Victoria Coach Maroon paint, with a tan leather interior and tan top, the condition of the leather is very good showing only very slight signs of use on the driver’s side.  The paint quality is very good, with nice panel fit and finish.  The fully restored dashboard is pure 1940s glamour, trimmed in proper gold accents that gleam in elegant compliment to both the exterior and the interior. Being a very prestigious car in its day, it is well-equipped with a radio, heater, power windows, power operated convertible top, clock, and full instrumentation.  The wheels are finished with correct chrome hubcaps and trim rings that are in very good condition and the polished chrome trim on the exterior is also in very good condition. The flathead V12 engine looks impressive and is very well detailed in the engine bay. This engine was never intended to make big power, but rather, it was highly regarded for its smoothness in operation. Quiet, silky and with a broad, flat torque curve, it provides effortless operation whether tooling around town or touring long distances on main roads. A three speed manual transmission feeds power to a standard Columbia 2-speed overdrive rear axle.  The car drives smoothly and almost silently, seeming to practically float over the road in comparison with its pre-war contemporaries. This is more than a beautiful car. The restoration has been done to show-driver standards, and it has seen regular use since the restoration was completed. This pre-war Lincoln Continental Cabriolet would be welcomed by the Classic Car Club of America, the Antique Automobile Club of America and the Lincoln & Continental Owners Club – as well as many other events – and would be a standout at any of these gatherings.

    Last update: 25 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1933 Duesenberg Model J Franay Sunroof Berline

    POA

    The glamorous life of travel, high fashion, and social status in the 1920s and ‘30s required a gusher of money. Gatsby-esque wealth was made by individual business tycoons, handed down as old money, royalty, movie stars or those who had simply been fortunate enough to marry into a family that allowed a life of extravagance. Among the vacation houses and resorts, a definite social requirement of the upper echelon was to have the finest bespoke automobiles in their carriage houses. Finest among those automobiles was the Duesenberg Model J. Each one was built to special order for the most discriminating owners, embodying all the features and principals which made the name Duesenberg synonymous with the utmost in quality. Largely recognized in period as the world’s finest automobile, the new Duesenberg Model J had at its core a massive 420-cid, 265 horsepower dual overhead camshaft straight eight-cylinder engine. Under E.L. Cord’s management, Fred Duesenberg’s masterpiece delivered otherworldly performance that no other car of the time could match.  With double the horsepower of any other motorcar of the era, it equally outclassed all others in smoothness, ease of handling, riding quality, comfort, longevity and luxury. No other car of this Classic era was considered so easy to handle or so pleasant to drive, nor did any other car have as much horsepower, or ease of performance.  Its speed, not even closely approached by others that had been considered fast, was merely the inevitable byproduct of Duesenberg’s aim to build superfine cars with wholly unmatched performance and extraordinary durability. Duesenberg proclaimed an unswerving devotion to one ideal: “To produce the best, forgetful of cost or expediency or any other consideration. A Duesenberg definitely excels every other automobile in the world, in every way.” It has been said that the most distinctive of all Duesenbergs are the few, exclusive models that were assembled by the great European coachbuilders; amongst them you will find Letourneur & Marchand, Hibbard & Darrin, Fernandez & Darrin, Saoutchik, Figoni, Graber, Van den Plas and Franay of Paris. Given their unparalleled stature, Duesenbergs bodied in Europe received the coachbuilders’ most extravagant and beautiful designs. This stunning example crafted by Jean-Baptiste Franay is no exception and its amazing appeal is only rivaled by the air of mystery, intrigue and excitement surrounding its first owner; Mabel Boll, who was known as Countess Proceri by the time she took delivery of her magnificent Duesenberg J. The daughter of a Rochester bartender, Mabel Boll was widely known in her day as the “Queen of Diamonds” for she loved not only to purchase jewels, but to flaunt them publicly. A natural beauty, her first job was selling cigars in a Rochester bar until she married businessman Robert Scott in 1909 and was well on her way to the top of the social ladder. In 1922 she married again to a Colombian coffee magnate, Hernando Rocha, who presented her with more than $1 million in jewels and a 46.57-carat emerald-cut diamond bearing her name. Boll collected nicknames like she collected jewelry: in 1921 she was hailed by newspapers as "Broadway's most beautiful blonde." When she married the Colombian coffee king in 1922 the press referred to her as the "$250,000-a-day bride." The "Queen of Diamonds" moniker became popular as she often appeared in public wearing much of her jewelry. It was said that the rings she wore on her left hand alone were worth more than $400,000, which would equate to approximately $5 million in today's dollars. In April 1931, Time magazine recorded the marriage of Mabel “Queen of Diamonds” Boll to Count Henri de Porceri, who was born in Poland and became a U.S. citizen. They were married in Paris and traveled extensively. In early 1934, the Countess acquired Duesenberg J-365 wearing this fabulous and distinct Sunroof Berline body by Franay. According to Ray Wolffe, the well-respected late Auburn, Cord, Duesenberg historian, this chassis was delivered new to France and it appears to have been first fitted with town car coachwork by the French firm of Kellner. For reasons unknown, the car was not sold in this configuration and the body is thought to have later been fitted and sold as J-516, also on a long wheelbase chassis. In August 1931, the J was adorned with new “sports sedan” coachwork by Franay, with a rare for Duesenberg sliding sunroof, divider window and fully-skirted rear fenders. In this new configuration the car was exhibited at the October 1931 Paris Salon with two-tone paintwork. A year later the car was again back at the Paris Salon, but this time it was painted in just one color. Following the death of Mable Boll, very little is known of the car again until the early 1950s when retired schoolteacher, Henri Beaud of Villeneuve, owned it. In the late 1950s the car was purchased in a partnership between Henri M. Petiet and Serge Pozzoli. Pozzoli is said to be one of the first in France to realize the historical importance of this motorcar. From 1965 until 1971, Paul Badre of Paris was its custodian, at which time Marc Nicolosi brokered the car to Gavin S. Herbert of Newport Beach, California. In 1974 the car changed hands again, selling briefly to Jonnie Bassett before ending up with Ray Egidi of Florida who immediately had the car restored. A year later the car sold to well-known jeweler Marvin Cohen of Chicago, Illinois, who carried out a major concours quality restoration in 1975 with some modifications to enhance the car’s overall appearance. This included accentuating the sloping roof and body line by taking off the built-in trunk, lengthening the hood, replacing the side louvers with signature Duesenberg chromed screens and side exhaust, special cabinetry on the back of the front seat and painting the body in its current magenta shade. Mr. Cohen sold the vehicle at auction to Patrick Ryan in 1988 and only two have owned this impressive Duesenberg J since. Today, J-365 remains a stunning example of 1930s beauty and refinement; it is believed to be one of only two Duesenbergs originally built with a sunroof. Other unique features include the hinged windscreen, divider window, chromed-cover dual sidemounts, luggage rack, skirted fenders, driving lights, chromed wire wheels, ornate rear woodwork with bar, crystal and instrumentation, plush leather interior, engine-turned dash fascia and desirable sweep-hand speedometer and tachometer amongst the standard and very complete Duesenberg instrument set. Mabel Boll's magnificent Duesenberg is seen and recognized in the majority of important publications on the marque and will be welcomed by most clubs and events for this era of motorcar. Period photos reveal the car during its early years abroad and relate its well-known history as it remains with most features from this wonderful record of presentation. This is an important, exquisitely styled motorcar that carries with it the legacy of a glamorous, fascinating woman; both being enduring symbols of a bygone era.

    Last update: 12 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1966 Ford Bronco U13 Roadster

    $59,500(£48,629.35)

    The booming market for early Ford Broncos broke out of the corral years ago.  But there are still exceptional examples to be found, including this completely restored 1966 Ford Bronco U13 Roadster.  Ford introduced the Bronco as an All-Purpose Vehicle.  The Bronco came as a complete surprise to most, announced on August 11, 1965 ready to appear in dealer showrooms in early September as a 1966 model.  Ford General Manager Donald Frey described the new Bronco as a combination of both a car and truck “for men and women who seek adventure as well as practical transportation”.  The Bronco was designed to go nearly anywhere and do nearly anything.  Clearly, Ford Motor Company had Jeep in their crosshairs.  Maybe the most surprising part of the Bronco lineup as we know it today, though, was the Bronco U13 Roadster.  This Bronco was the most Jeep-like of all, with cut-outs for doors to ease entry and exit, a windshield that folded flat and a canvas-backed vinyl top and doors that came only as options.  Other new Bronco models provided conventional doors and hardtops. Viewed from the perspective of fifty years, the Bronco Roadster looks even more Jeep-like.  Flat metal panels and exposed overlapping seams are shamelessly visible both in the interior and under the hood.  The exposed metal floor is painted body color and the dashboard is also plain painted metal.  Warn hubs in the center of the front wheels require the driver to jump down to the ground and turn the hubs manually before pressing a ridiculously tall black shift lever into high or low 4-wheel drive ranges.  Body-colored fiberglass door inserts were the only concession to refinement.  Anyone who has ever driven a Jeep CJ will even recognize some of the switchgear and the pedal placement.  The standard engine was a 105 horsepower 170 c.i. straight-six, with the small 289 V-8 (later 302) as an option. Magazine covers and feature stories invariably featured the open Bronco Roadster.  But the Bronco U13 Roadster was in production only from 1966-1968, and surprisingly accounted for fewer than 5,000 vehicles out of a total first-generation Bronco production of 225,585 ending in 1977. This 1966 Ford Bronco U13 Roadster has been fully restored to very high standards. It is correct to factory specification and finished in the correct 1966-only color of Caribbean Turquoise with white trim.  Other correct cosmetic details of note include the gray painted metal dashboard, square-end white painted bumpers and painted left outside rear view mirror.  Mechanically, the 170 c.i. six-cylinder engine is equipped with a three-speed manual transmission mounted on the column and Dana 20 transfer case.  Optional factory equipment on this outstanding example begins with the distinctive seating.  A front bench seat for three was standard on the first Broncos, finished in black vinyl.  Options included selection of a single left-hand bucket seat, left- and right-hand bucket seats and a rear bench seat, all with seat belts, covered in silver vinyl that was also a one-year option.  The matching padded sun visors coordinate with the seats.  A one-piece rubber floor mat covers only the area ahead of the front seats and is embossed with the Bronco logo.  Other options found here include a switch for emergency flasher lights, heater and defroster controls, and a modern but period looking radio flanking the black two-spoke steering wheel on the austere dashboard.  Visible from the exterior are also the inside tailgate mounted spare tire, chrome wheel covers and correct optional white side accent stripes that bear a close family resemblance to the Mustang GT’s rocker stripes.  Modern BF Goodrich T/A tires are mounted on the 15-inch wheels, the single concession to modern driving. The engine compartment is beautifully detailed and correct.  The stark engine compartment is correctly painted in body color.  The engine is painted in correct Ford blue and equipped with the oil bath-style air cleaner that is specific to the earliest Broncos.  All hoses, fittings and belts appear as new, of course, as does the battery.  A correct FoMoCo windshield washer bag hangs on front fender housing provided added authenticity. This phenomenal 1966 Ford Bronco U13 Roadster is a virtual time traveler, a correct benchmark vehicle and a certain winner wherever it might be shown.  Bronco owners and collectors are a varied and enthusiastic group.  A Bronco Register and a myriad of clubs provide information, support and competition in many areas of the country.  And, guess what?  With all the significant automotive anniversaries being celebrated, 2016 is also the 50th Anniversary of the Ford Bronco.  This is one of the finest examples available.

    Last update: 19 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1989 Mercedes-Benz 560SL Convertible

    $56,500(£46,177.45)

    With the introduction of the W113 chassis in the early 1960s, Mercedes-Benz had essentially invented their own class of sports roadster. This 2 seat roadster was less of an all-out sports car, and more of an all-weather GT car with superior refinement and quality that meant it could be used as an everyday driver. The W113 proved a great success through three generations and in 1971 was replaced by an all-new SL, known internally as the R107. The R107 was a new chassis design that utilized shared suspension and drivetrain components from mid-sized Mercedes sedans, but wore unique sheet metal designed by the great Bruno Sacco. The R107 offered greater luxury, performance and modern refinement than its predecessor and while it still was not a hardcore sports car, it could hold its own on fast, flowing roads and was unmatched for its continent crushing ability. The first generation 350SL featured the same V8 shared with the 280SE 3.5, which was soon enlarge to the big 4.5liter version and renamed 450SL. The 107 SL proved to be a runaway success for Mercedes, thanks to the exceptionally well-engineered chassis, excellent performance from the V8 engines, and unrivaled build quality. Production of the R107 lasted from 1971 through 1989, making it the longest production run of any Mercedes-Benz passenger car to date. Only the Galandewagen off-roader has been in production longer. For the final version of the R107, engineers took the 5.6 liter V8 from flagship SEL sedan and shoehorned it into the roadster body to create the 560SL, in turn creating an instant classic and the very best of the R107 SL family. With the benefit of nearly two decades of development and technological refinements such as ABS brakes and traction control, as well as stout performance from the alloy V8, the last of the great SLs strikes the perfect balance of style and performance. The 560SL also comes from a time when legendary Mercedes-Benz dependability was at its pinnacle, yet still offers relative ease of service. Few roadsters can compare with the 560SL for its all-round capabilities and exceptional refinement. Paired with timeless styling, it is easy to see why the 560SL and its siblings have so quickly become full-fledged collectibles. This handsome 1989 560SL is an outstanding example, showing just 19,825 miles from new. It is a one family owned car from new in beautiful condition, finished in the striking combination of Smoke Silver over Burgundy leather. It is a very fine car that has exceptionally well maintained from new and kept in impeccably clean condition. The original “15-hole” style alloy wheels look beautiful against the superb paint. Likewise, the hard-wearing leather interior has been beautifully maintained and preserved in excellent condition. Burl walnut trim on the console and dash is in exquisite condition, and it still retains its original Becker Grand Prix stereo. Both tops are present and in excellent order, with the soft top in contrasting black and the hard top finished in matching Smoke Silver as per original, and the fully trimmed trunk is in excellent condition. The 5.6 liter, Bosch fuel-injected V8 engine runs strong and smooth, as it should, and has been exceptionally well maintained. The incredibly clean engine bay is properly detailed with correct original gold-cadmium fittings, clamps, hardware and decals all in excellent order.  The car has a clean CarFax, and Included with the car are the original books and manuals, data card, spare keys, as well as the original window sticker and original purchase documents. These are famously robust automobiles, but only when properly maintained and cared for, and this example has clearly been cherished from the day it was first delivered. The 560SL is a rapidly appreciating classic, and fine examples such as this are in high demand; yet they still represent an excellent value considering the robust performance and legendary reliability.  

    Last update: 18 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1990 Mazda Miata Convertible

    $32,500(£26,562.25)

    The Mazda Miata was welcomed as the second coming of the affordable British sports car when it was introduced for 1990.  Never mind that the Miata was built in Japan, styled in California or came from no appreciable racing heritage.  Instead, the Mazda Miata was hailed as everything the lamented British roadsters should have been and perhaps could have been.  Alas, by the time the Mazda Miata was introduced production British sports cars were virtually a thing of the past. The Mazda Miata was described as a lightweight, rear wheel-drive roadster with a rigid chassis, five-speed manual transmission, phenomenal balance and perfectly weighted steering. A 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine providing 115 horsepower powered the first Miata, but tipping the scales at slightly over 2,000 pounds that was already good enough for a top speed of 125 mph plus.  The designation ‘RX-5’ was preferred by the car’s engineers to reflect on Mazda’s history with rotary-powered automobiles.  But the Miata wasn’t rotary powered.  The first generation MX-5 Miata started its own lineage instead, with the ‘M’ meaning ‘prize’ or ‘reward’ in Japanese. Legions of old and new enthusiasts eagerly embraced the new Miata.  It didn’t hurt a bit that the styling created by American Mark Jordan and Asian-American Tom Matano at Mazda’s California Design Center bore a strong resemblance to the Lotus Elan right down to the sleek pop-up headlights.  The Japanese engineered and built chassis and running gear had already come to mean something far more to buyers than affordable British sports ever achieved – reliability.  Technically, the Miata was a convertible, not a roadster, with roll-up glass side windows, a tight-fitting soft top and even an available removable hard top.  But a comfortable two-seat cockpit and a heater that actually worked were enough to seal the deal for many, who made the Miata their only car.  The Mazda Miata has become the most popular roadster in history with total sales estimated somewhere around a million cars since 1990. A few of the most ardent of the Miata’s new enthusiasts went as far as to purchase a new Miata and immediately put it into storage.  The first-year Mazda MX-5 we are offering here is a brand new, twenty-six year old Mazda MX-5 Miata with everything ‘but the box it came in’.  The odometer shows just 3,310 miles from new.  This Miata presents as a brand new car, finished in Silver Stone Metallic with a black cloth interior, black soft top and the body-colored optional hardtop fitted in place.  Other equipment as originally delivered includes power steering, leather wrapped steering wheel, am/fm cassette player and alloy wheels, as well as power brakes, cruise control and air conditioning.  Accordingly, every detail about this car is in as-new condition. Delivery includes original documentation from the East Pointe Car Company of Kentwood, Michigan, the new car dealer who sold this Miata, complete with business cards from the dealership.  All delivery stickers, the original owners manual and booklets in the original envelope are also provided with the sale. Whether it was the appeal of a new two-seat, open-air sports car, the new/old styling, modern equipment or comfort that the first Mazda Miata represented, Miatas have created a large and loyal following all around the world.  Mazda’s advertising in 2016 still promises a “Pure. Modern. Roadster.”  Want more?  J.D. Power describes the Mazda Miata as the best selling two seat-sports car of all time.  This is an opportunity to invest in a time capsule example of the first year Mazda Miata that is ready is every way to show, benchmark or drive sparingly without mindless obsession on preserving original mileage – it’s already been driven.  Who will be the next driver?    

    Last update: 24 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1963 Jaguar E-Type Roadster

    $250,000(£204,325)

    On March 15th, 1961, the world was introduced to Jaguar’s latest creation, the E-Type. On its debut, the car made an enormous impression on the fortunate 200 media members who witnessed its unveiling. The striking appearance of the E-Type was the main catalyst for the initial excitement, but the looks weren’t the only things going exceptionally well for the E-Type. Its performance figures were stout and it had an equally refreshing price to boot. Jaguar’s newest masterpiece released 265 horsepower to the rear wheels, propelling it to a top speed of 150 miles per hour. In 1961, numbers like these usually meant spending upwards of $10,000, but to a great surprise, the E-Type was only $5,500. Undoubtedly, Jaguar’s E-Type was one of the best performance buys in all of Europe. Even though the car itself was completely new, the heart of the beast was the same 3.8 liter 6-cylinder power plant used in the previous Jaguar XK150S. The 3.8 was wonderful in the XK150S, and worked even better in the state-of-the-art E-Type chassis in thanks to the sleek body and 150 pound weight loss from the XK150. One of the many reasons why the E-Type turned out and performed to such a high standard was due to Jaguar’s racing program. Jaguar won the 24 Hour of LeMans 5 times between 1951 and 1957, and after the 1957 victory, Jaguar was in need of producing a new sports car to keep the company moving forward. The need for a new car led to the assembly of two prototypes in the late 1950’s, the E1A and E2A. E1A was heavily tested by Jaguar while E2A was turned into a race car in 1960 where the car was lent to Briggs Cunningham and raced by Dan Gurney, Jack Brabham, and Bruce McLaren. Between E1A and E2A, Jaguar used the best features from both cars to formulate the perfect platform for their new machine. This is one of the finest E Types we’ve seen. Dispatched from Coventry on January 8, 1963, chassis 878834 has undergone a complete ground up nut & bolt restoration, by a Pebble Beach multiple award winning restoration shop.  This was not a car done for a customer, this was a car built for the owner of the shop for his own personal use, and as such it is simply stunning. Originally finished in cream over red leather, the restorer wanted the car to stand out from the myriad of E Types out there, and chose to restore the car in one Jaguar’s prettiest, correct, but seldom seen combination of Opalescent Dark Blue with grey leather.  The build is set off by wide whitewall tires, as often fitted to early E Types when new, but rarely seen today.  The interior is fabulous, and the level of detail continues, down to the correct shift knob and original radio.  The Stayfast top has never been lowered. Of course the car retains its original matching number engine, which is detailed to better than new standards.  The boot contains the proper jack and original tool set, and included with the sale is the Jaguar Heritage Trust certificate. The quality to which this car was restored unquestionably shows the level of detail and finesse a Pebble Beach restorer would put into any one of their builds.  This car is exquisite in every way and is ready to shown or driven.

    Last update: 19 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1914 Regal Underslung Touring

    $57,500(£46,994.75)

    In the first decade of the twentieth century, Detroit, Michigan was awash with pioneering automobile manufacturers. Hundreds of different companies tried their hand at the building automobiles, with wildly varying levels of success. Some did not make it past the first few cars, others did not make it past the first year and fewer still made it past World War I. The Regal Automobile Company opened its doors in 1908 and had shown early promise by building quality, mid-sized, conventional cars. In an effort to promote their reliability, a 1909 Regal 30 HP crossed the US continent multiple times, racking up 22,000 miles and attracting plenty of attention in the process. In 1911, Regal made a dramatic change with the introduction of the Model N. The Model N featured a stylish “underslung” chassis, giving a low and rakish look, coupled with a two-seat raceabout-style body. With its stylish looks and reliable 4-cylinder engine, the Regal Model N was seen as a “baby Mercer” – a car that cost at least twice that of the Regal. In response to the success of the highly regarded Model N, Regal increased their Underslung offerings the following year to include several models.  Regal was not the only manufacturer to offer an underslung design, but the most significant other than the American Underslung built in Indianapolis, Indiana.  During the years of production, Regal also built automobiles with conventional frames.  All Regals produced between 1910-1914 were powered by four-cylinder engines producing 20 to 40 hp.  The Regal Automobile Company could not withstand rapidly inflating material costs related to World War I, and in 1918 was placed in receivership. ‘Underslung’ described the chassis design, where the axles were suspended above the frame.  This placement resulted in a lower ride height that presumed to reduce the dangers of skidding or ‘turning turtle’, as early motorists feared.  “Underslung construction means ‘safety’”, declared advertising for the Regal Underslung Touring Car. “Here (are) all the advantages of the costly Underslung construction within a reasonable purchase car.”  Therein was the unique appeal of the Regal Underslung.  The Regal Underslung was offered in choices of three body styles, including a smaller Roadster and a fully enclosed Colonial Coupe in addition to the Touring Car.  In 1914 the five-passenger Touring Car was referred to as the Model T with 25 hp, or the Model C with 35 hp.  Production of Regal automobiles for 1914 reached 8,136, the highest in the eleven-year history of the marque save for 1915, before ending in 1918 as a result of material shortages owing to WWI.  Very few Regal Underslungs are known to survive today.  Some of those have been referred to as ‘the only surviving’ examples, but that is simply not the case. This 1914 Regal Underslung Twenty-Five Touring Car is a wonderful older restoration, very attractively finished in light grey with black fenders.  Red coach lines provide distinctive accents to both the body and the fenders.  Restrained brass finished accents on the car include the radiator shell, headlight rims and hub caps, as well as the step plates on the running boards. The Artillery-style wheels feature gorgeous natural finished wood centers with black demountable rims and period correct tires. The black leatherette top attaches at the front to the folding windshield frame in a way that allows for the upper portion of the windshield to be folded even when the top is in place.  The interior is also black with a button tufted pattern and a high mounted left-hand steering wheel finished with a brass center and wood rim.  Wood trim surrounds the upper edges of the body, with a single spare mounted at the rear.  The four-cylinder engine is nicely detailed, showing both use and care as to be expected from an older restoration that has been driven and enjoyed. With its manageable scale and the lower profile resulting from the underslung chassis, this car will make a distinctive impression wherever it appears with plenty of stories to tell about the manufacturer and the underslung construction.  This is a very rare opportunity to acquire an unusual, fascinating underslung Brass Era automobile that is gorgeous from top to bottom and that will be welcome at car shows, or enjoyed simply for driving around town.

    Last update: 27 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1930 LaSalle Model 4060

    $99,500(£81,321.35)

    GM’s long-serving president, Alfred P. Sloan was a man of tremendous vision. He saw the company into its greatest days and in the process developed many new strategies that still influence the automobile industry to this day. One of his more influential ideas was that of the companion brand. In the 1920s, Sloan had seen an ever growing price gap between the various brands within GM. Buick, Oldsmobile and Oakland each had their own companion brand to help bridge the gaps between lines, in the form of Marquette, Viking and Pontiac, respectively. When looking at Cadillac, Sloan decided that a new companion line should be offered below the famous brand, one that would provide “built by Cadillac” prestige at a price point that was more realistic for upper-middle class buyers. The new brand was called LaSalle and it offered a full range of attractive body styles built by Fisher and Fleetwood. The attractive bodies were penned by a talented young stylist named Harley Earl, in his first role at General Motors. LaSalle enjoyed a rather successful run in its first few years, beginning in 1927. The Harley Earl styling was fresh and very attractive and LaSalle’s influence began to trickle down across the rest of the GM line. Fitment of Cadillac’s V8 engine meant the LaSalle was quite rapid and sporty thanks to the smaller and lighter chassis in comparison to its big brother. The onset of the Great Depression did put a damper on sales, however. Marquette and Viking had been killed off by 1930, but LaSalle was allowed to soldier on until the plug was pulled in 1941. In spite of consistently outselling Cadillac, LaSalle was shuttered to protect Cadillac’s reputation as a leader in the market against the likes of cross-town rivals at Packard. Our featured 1930 LaSalle Model 4060 Phaeton is a handsome older restoration and a very usable example of this classic marque. The very desirable Fleetwood-built Phaeton body is finished in cream over brown fenders, chassis and coach lines with orange pinstripes and cream wheels providing the accents. While the restoration was completed some years ago, it was a proper full-nut-and-bolt affair that still presents nicely today. The paint is lovely, with a nice gloss and crisp body lines. A myriad of accessories are fitted such as dual sidemount spares, chrome spare-mounted mirrors, radiator stone guard, twin Trippelights, goddess radiator mascot and wind wings. Much of the chrome has been refreshed, though the bumpers do appear a bit careworn, though otherwise straight and solid. The tan leather interior is tidy and attractive with a moderate patina on the front seats and carpet, while the rear seat doesn’t show too many signs of use. The driver’s seat shows some heavy creasing though is intact and still quite attractive. Original instruments grace the simple and clean dash, with dials to indicate water temp, oil pressure, amps, fuel level, speed as well as a lovely Jaeger clock. The large tan canvas top is in very good condition, showing no staining or excessive wear. Likewise, the top frame operates smoothly and is straight and free of damage. A matching tan canvas cover is fitted over the trunk, which is held in place with bridle leather straps. Cadillac’s famous V8 engine is found under the hood and is well presented. The engine is clean and presents in period appropriate finishes, though it is not fussy or overdetailed. The presentation is in keeping with approachable and usable nature of this car. The V8 runs strong, smooth and the car performs simply beautifully on the road. As a recognized CCCA Full Classic, it would make an excellent tour car and would be superb for taking the family on ice cream runs or weekend getaways. It is easy to operate and a delight to drive, particularly when the large top is folded and everyone can enjoy the open air and the spacious cabin. ils.

    Last update: 16 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1965 Jaguar XKE Coupe

    $175,000(£143,027.50)

    The most beautiful car in the world: This sentiment has been repeated over and over again when describing Jaguar’s legendary E-Type. But the E-Type was so much more than just a pretty face when it first shocked audiences at the 1961 Geneva Salon. Here was a car that was not only stunningly beautiful to look at, but offered 150mph performance and a sophisticated chassis all in a package that cost half that of its competitors. A tremendous amount of experience that was gained from the D-Type program was then filtered into the design of the E-Type. The innovative and advanced D-Type had won LeMans three times on the fly, thanks to its advanced aerodynamics, powerful disc brakes and the lightweight and robust monocoque chassis. With the D-Type as a starting point, the E-Type sported a similar semi-monocoque chassis that used a sheet steel tub for the passenger compartment, paired with tubular steel subframes which supported engine and independent front suspension. The rear suspension was also independent, and was mounted to a modular subframe that carried the wishbones, hubs, diff and inboard disc brakes. Those brakes were the same Dunlop four-wheel discs that had proven their worth in punishing conditions at LeMans. The XK six-cylinder engine (in 3.8l and later 4.2l form) was tuned to deliver 265 horsepower. All of this technology was wrapped in a gorgeous body penned by Jaguar’s aerodynamicist Malcolm Sayer and tweaked by Sir William Lyons himself. Jaguar had created a legend virtually overnight and the E-Type remains a cornerstone of the collector car world, where examples can be found in virtually every significant collection as well as in the hands of passionate enthusiasts. This 1965 E-Type 4.2 liter fixed head coupe is a stunning example finished in striking black over red leather, and riding on chrome wire wheels and blackwall tires. It was fully restored in the 1990s to a very high standard, with gorgeous paint work, excellent chrome, and high quality finishing. The color combination, while not factory original for this car, looks absolutely gorgeous on the iconic E-Type coupe shape. Bodywork is laser straight and the paint is simply exquisite. The chrome on the bumpers, window trims, and wheels is in outstanding order and the overall finishing has been done to a high standard of quality. While the cosmetics are certainly striking, there has been equal emphasis put on the mechanical quality as well. Beneath the signature, forward hinged bonnet rests a beautifully detailed; number’s matching 4.2 liter inline six. The alloy cam covers, intake manifold and S.U. carburetor dashpots have been fully polished and simply sparkle against the black body. Hoses, fittings, and hardware are all in excellent order and the engine is spotlessly clean. The exposed front suspension components are similarly well detailed with correct finishes. Among all road-going E-types, the 4.2 liter is the most desirable thanks to its broad torque curve, improved braking servo, more comfortable cabin and all-synchro manual 4-speed gearbox. The fresh red leather interior features the correct, adjustable-back seats that differentiate the 4.2 from the 3.8 with its fixed back chairs. Leather covers the seats and center console, while wool carpets and vinyl interior paneling are all trimmed in the correct style and materials. Some subtle enhancements have been made for driver comfort, such as a smaller diameter steering wheel and a subtly upgraded Retro Radio audio system. Thanks to the large side-hinged hatch, there is plenty of luggage space for a weekend getaway. Recent receipts show over $17,000 for a mechanical freshening and a new, professionally trimmed interior. The E-Type 4.2 is a slightly more tractable car than the hard-edged 3.8, and collectors tend to gravitate toward these later Series 1 examples. These cars are an absolute delight to drive and can easily potter around town on a wave of torque, or be taken on a high-speed tour thanks to the healthy 265 horsepower ‘six. With all that power, torque and passenger comfort, the E-Type truly is one of the greatest GT cars of all time; and that’s before we even get to those iconic looks.  

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale