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Hyman Ltd Cars for sale

101 Search results
  • 1922 Duesenberg Model A Phaeton

    $395,000(£306,875.50)

    Brothers Fred and August Duesenberg are undoubtedly two of the most influential personalities in the evolution of the automobile. Their engineering prowess can be compared with the likes of Harry Miller, Ettore Bugatti and Ferdinand Porsche among others, and the machines that bear their name continue to be among the most desirable and valuable American automobiles ever produced. Of course, most casual enthusiasts immediately think of the J and SJ series of the early 1930s when the Duesenberg name is mentioned. After all, the J was a great among greats, the fastest and most powerful American automobile, producing 265 horsepower (320 in supercharged form) at a time when other luxury cars could hardly top 150 horsepower. The SJ and its short-wheelbase version could be considered the first Supercar. But before the Model J, and before E.L. Cord’s takeover of the firm, there was the Straight Eight, commonly known as Model A: Fred and August’s very first serial production model. The Duesenberg Model A (officially marketed as the “Straight Eight”) was a very fine automobile that was saddled by lackluster business decisions by the company’s bosses. The Duesenberg brothers recognized they were better engineers than businessmen, and set to work in establishing a new company structure that handed the business dealings over to Newton Van Zandt and Luther M. Rankin. The new owners established a new factory in Indianapolis and work began on designing a new production car. A prototype was shown early in 1920, however following a last-minute redesign of the engine (Fred decided an overhead cam should replace the original side-rocker arm arrangement) the initial buzz surrounding the car had faded, hampering sales. Much of the company’s money had been spent on the factory, leaving little left over for actual production. Projections were for 2,400 cars per year, but that quickly became a pipe-dream when actual production was more like 1 car per day. But Duesenberg soon found their footing and sales of the Model A gradually gained momentum. The car itself was a true standout. It was the very first serial production car in America to feature an inline-eight cylinder engine – dubbed “Eight-in-a-Row” in period advertising. The engine drew heavily from Duesenberg’s racing experience, displacing 260 cubic inches (about 4.3 liters) and featuring an overhead camshaft, crossflow combustion chambers, detachable head, and a healthy 88 horsepower output. The chassis was a conventional ladder frame with well-tuned suspension and four-wheel hydraulic brakes; the first production car to feature them. Brake drums were of finned alloy to aid in cooling, another lesson learned on the race track. Ultimately, history was not on the side of the Model A, while it is no doubt a brilliant automobile; it seems to have lived in the shadow of its more flamboyant Model J siblings. We are very proud to offer this 1922 Duesenberg Straight Eight Model A; magnificent example of this ground-breaking automobile from one of the greatest names in automotive history. This stunning Duesenberg wears a stylish Sport Phaeton body by Millspaugh & Irish, the Indianapolis-based coachbuilder responsible for most Duesenberg A bodies. As this car was initially discovered, part of the original coachwork had been modified, though it has since been meticulously researched and restored in original specification, executed to the highest standard. The restoration, which has importantly received an ACD #1 Certification, is presented in a gorgeous tri-tone color scheme with a dove gray main body and dark gray fenders being subtly accented with a deep red chassis and wheels. It is an understated yet breathtaking look that suits the sporty coachwork very well. Body and paint quality is to concours levels with outstanding fit and finish. Detailing is understated, with the beautifully polished nickel radiator flanked by drum headlamps as correct, and topped with a winged Duesenberg-branded Moto-Meter. Dual side mounts feature upholstered covers and very cool period mirrors. Dual cowl lamps are affixed to the windscreen frame and a painted metal trunk sits out back. Bumpers and other bright trim are finished to a very high standard in keeping with the rest of the body. The cabin is trimmed in black leather which presents in beautiful, fresh condition showing little to no signs of use since the restoration. Door panels feature pockets with embossed flaps and the rear of the front seat is equipped with built-in wooden cabinets, presumably for storing a lap blanket for crisp morning drives. The Dash is finished in black lacquer as correct and a Duesenberg 8-branded Warner De Luxe instrument cluster sits front and center. The beautiful wooden steering wheel has been restored with a furniture grade finish. The folding top is trimmed in black canvas and remains taut, with a full set of side curtains included. Of course, the highlight of any Duesenberg is the engine, and this exquisite example does not disappoint. The overhead-cam straight eight is beautifully presented against the polished alloy firewall as original. The engine is painted in a light dove-gray, which is correct for these early Duesenbergs, as only the later cars got the signature bright green treatment. The cam cover is polished alloy, the wiring loom gorgeous nickel plated steel, and the ancillaries are all finished to concours quality standards, including the Robert Bosch horn on the firewall. The engine is impeccably presented, a gorgeous piece of engineering that also delivers excellent performance out on the road. Shown at Pebble Beach in 2010 where it also participated in the Pebble Beach Tour, this fine Duesenberg Model A has also received its ACD-club Certification, as well as an ACD Club National award and an AACA Junior award in 2011. Rarely do early Duesenbergs such as this appear on the open market, and this is a fine opportunity to acquire a fabulously restored example wearing beautiful coachwork. It remains very fresh and is ready to continue its show successes, and will surely provide a rewarding experience on the road, thanks to the astounding performance from the highly advanced eight-cylinder engine and impeccable restoration.

    Last update: 2 Days Old
    For sale
    Hyman Ltd
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  • 1927 Cadillac Series 314 Double Cowl Sport Phaeton

    $195,000(£151,495.50)

    Cadillac had long established its reputation as a leader for innovation and quality in the luxury car market by the 1920s. The long-running and fierce battle with Packard for sales supremacy meant Cadillac engineers were constantly striving for new ideas to refine and enhance their vehicles. As the decade drew to a close, Cadillac was highly motivated to retake their standing at the top of the sales charts from their cross-town rivals. The introduction of the junior LaSalle brand in 1927 helped greatly in their quest, and was intended to complement the senior models, which in 1927 consisted of the Model 314 V8 series. A dizzying array of body styles were offered, from the standard Cadillac bodies, to the Custom lines from both Fisher and Fleetwood. We are very pleased to offer this truly stunning 1927 Model 314 wearing a Double Cowl Sport Phaeton body from the Fisher Body Custom line.  It is presented in magnificent colors; the all-black body and fenders accented with a simple but bold red inlay and subtle cream-colored coach lines. The combination is breathtaking, and the quality of the restoration equally impressive. This highly desirable and stylish 314 was treated to a comprehensive, concours-quality restoration and has seen only light use since completion. It has been shown and obsessively well cared-for, remaining in impeccable condition. The black paint is beautifully applied over laser straight panels, and the extensive brightwork and detailing are in beautiful condition. It is fitted with drum headlights, very rare dual, drum-style Pilot-ray spot lamps, drum cowl lamps, Cadillac mirrors mounted on dual-sidemount spares, and the first known Cadillac radiator mascot – a herald in Cadillac regalia, proudly trumpeting the praises of the marque. In the rear is found a painted trunk rack with a fantastic period trunk and black canvas cover. This is an extremely handsome body that looks elegant with the top up or down, though we are particularly fond of the sporting attitude it takes on with the top down and both windscreens folded flat. Occupants are treated to a gorgeous red interior that matches the red flash on the bodywork. Gray carpeting bound in red provides a bit of subtle contrast. The leather upholstery is simply exquisite, showing little signs of use and virtually no creasing. There is a beautifully finished wood-rimmed steering wheel perched atop a chromed steering column, and complemented by a matching wood gear knob. The highlight of the interior, however has to be the instrument panel; a stunningly ornate affair with a wood fascia surrounded by gorgeous gold inlay. The instruments themselves are fully restored, and the Cadillac crest is proudly inlaid in gold. Rear passengers are treated to their own cowl and windscreen for comfort and weather protection, as well as courtesy lights and a storage compartment built into the rear of the front seat. The engine, drivetrain and chassis are all detailed to concours standards, the quality of the restoration backed by a CCCA Senior Award badge earned in 2005. This fabulous Cadillac has been the proud showpiece of a dedicated marque enthusiast who has bestowed upon it years of care. We love the Harley Earl styling the breathtaking Fleetwood detailing, and would proudly use this handsome, desirable and rare Cadillac for show or touring. This is a very worthy addition to virtually any collection.

    Last update: 4 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1987 Mercedes-Benz 560SL Convertible

    $51,500(£40,010.35)

    Following the commercial success of the R113-series 230, 250 and 280SL, Mercedes-Benz realized they had a tough act to follow with its replacement. The R113 SL models were responsible for perfecting Mercedes’ formula for their ideal sports roadster. The 300SL was a technological marvel, but costly to build, buy and maintain. The 190SL utilized humble passenger car architecture in a pretty body, but was perhaps a bit too pedestrian in terms of performance. The 230SL fixed that with its fuel-injected six cylinder engine and well-honed chassis that borrowed much from other cars in the Mercedes lineup, though with better resolved handling and far better performance. The R113 was continuously improved through the 1971 280SL, the car’s focus being less overtly sporty than its rivals, yet still enormously capable as a comfortable and imminently stylish grand tourer. Mercedes-Benz understood the importance of this new SL roadster, and they threw all they had been studying in the previous decade into the project, with the first examples hitting the road in late 1971. Stuttgart engineers had become obsessed with safety and with the idea of overbuilding their cars. Every surface of the new car, internally known as R107, was carefully honed for maximum safety. Even the signature ribbed tail lights are a result of safety studies, engineers found they stayed cleaner and therefore more visible in poor weather conditions. In spite of the obsession for safety, the R107 wore sophisticated and elegantly styled bodywork with traditional long-bonnet, short-deck proportions. Like other SLs before it, the new car was available with a removable hard top for all-weather enjoyment. Architecture followed the established SL ethos, borrowing from other mid-sized Mercedes cars for suspension and drivetrain, but fine tuning the handling for a more sporting feel. The 107 was produced from 1971-1989; the Mercedes second-longest running model in the marque’s history, and in the process earning its place as an iconic status symbol of the 1980s. Our featured car is the ultimate model of the R107 range, a 560SL from 1987. For this, the final iteration of the series, engineers shoehorned the big 5.6 liter V8 engine and automatic transmission from the 560SEL sedan, creating the fastest and arguably most desirable model of the line. Nearly two decades of development meant the 560SL still felt fresh and benefitted from an impressive equipment list that included ABS brakes, limited slip differential, and a driver’s side airbag. This fine example has covered a genuine 28,395 miles from new and presents in excellent condition throughout. The Signal Red paint (code 5680) is excellent and looks great against the original bright-finish wheels. The body is exceptionally straight, showing no signs of accidents or corrosion, which is backed by a clean Carfax report. It wears its original hardtop and black German canvas soft-top, both in excellent condition. A hard top stand for easy, safe storage will be included in the sale. The chrome bumpers are straight and clean, with the front bumper wearing original Bosch fog lamps. The Anthracite leather interior (code 271) is consistent with the rest of the car, being exceptionally clean and original with excellent seats, door panels and carpets. The dash is crack-free and the wood trim intact and free from cracked lacquer or delamination. Even the delicate wood strips on the fascia are in excellent condition. The interior is completely stock down to the original airbag steering wheel, Becker Grand Prix radio and optional central arm rest. Likewise, the trunk is tidy and clean with factory correct carpeting and panels. Original books, tools and jack are included. The 5.6 liter V8 engine is very nicely detailed, appearing clean and tidy with signs of regular maintenance. The factory finishes on the hardware and ancillaries remain in great condition, indicative of this car’s very low mileage. A stack of records and receipts, as well as the comprehensive Carfax report, show this car received plenty of routine maintenance in the hands of its last owners. This is an excellent example of what is considered to be the most desirable of the R107 series. These rapidly appreciating classics are excellent all-rounders, combining iconic good looks with exceptional reliability, vault-like build quality and surprising performance.  

    Last update: 6 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1938 Delahaye 135MS Coupe

    $1,450,000(£1,126,505)

    Thanks to the great technical innovation and foresight of Émile Delahaye, and his successor Amédée Varlet, Societe Des Automobiles Delahaye earned its place as one of France’s grandes routieres, building magnificent touring cars and high performance machines that racked up success on the grand prix circuit as well as the great sports car races of the era. Production of their most recognized and successful model, the 135, began in 1935 as a 3.2 liter sports car of either 90 or 110 horsepower. For 1936, a larger, 3,558cc triple carburetor overhead-cam six was made available in the 135M. It was upgraded yet again for the 135 MS, which became the machine of choice for buyers looking to use their prized Delahaye in competition. This magnificent engine delivered upward of 160 horsepower in the highest state of tune. When combined with a lightweight body, even a standard 135MS was capable of 100 mph, a rare accomplishment for any pre-war automobile. Saoutchik, Franay and Henri Chapron were all employed to grace the Delahaye 135 with their artful bodies. And while their work doubtlessly helped to establish the model as a symbol for pre-war French elegance, it was the show-stopping teardrop designs by Joseph Figoni of Figoni et Falaschi that truly became the hallmark of the Delahaye 135. Joseph Figoni was born in Italy in 1894, immigrating to France as a young child. At age 14 he began an apprenticeship with a local carriage maker, and following his military service, opened his own body repair shop in Boulogne in 1923. Figoni quickly gained a reputation for his quality craftsmanship and was soon being asked by owners of Bugatti, Salmson, and Delage automobiles to redesign wings and other details with good effect. He soon moved on to complete bodies; and as he became bored with traditional boxy shapes, he evolved his style, taking an ever more streamlined approach. Carrosserie Figoni would go on to produce some truly desirable and stunningly beautiful automobiles, but it was Figoni’s partnership with financier Ovidio Falaschi that truly marked the turning point in his craft. The stunning Goutte d’Or “teardrop” bodies of the mid 1930s brought Figoni & Falaschi, as well as Delahaye, to the forefront of high fashion style in motoring. The story of our featured 1938 Delahaye 135 MS Coupe, chassis number 60112, begins at the 1938 Paris Salon, where, clothed in Figoni body number 729, it shared the Figoni et Falaschi stand with a V12 powered Delahaye 165 Cabriolet. According to interviews with Mr. Claude Figoni, the son of company founder Joseph, the resplendent teardrop coupe was shown in Paris in gleaming off-white, accented by a red interior, with the colors of French flag proudly adorning the radiator grille. It was soon delivered to its first owner, and with war looming, it is likely the Delahaye was very soon hidden away to protect it from occupying forces in France. From there it disappeared until 1964 when it was discovered by famed pre-war car hunter Antoine Raffaeli (Author, Memoirs of a Bugatti Hunter) hidden among the reeds in southern France. Discovering the car proved far easier than acquiring it, as Mr. Raffaeli pursued the car doggedly for the next 21 years, eventually convincing Madame Michele Gautier to part with her very special Delahaye in 1985. Rafaelli delivered the car to the Conforti Brothers in Nice for a restoration which took place from 1986-1987. While in restoration, it was discovered that the years of exposure to the elements had taken their toll on the coachwork, and the body was painstakingly recrafted using the remains of the original as a template. Rafaelli sold the newly restored Delahaye in 1990 and it soon joined Peter Kaus’s famed Rosso Bianco Collection in Germany where it remained until 2006. The late American collector John O’Quinn was next to acquire S/N 60112. He found the restoration to be ageing and commissioned a fresh one, managed by Parisian Delahaye expert Benoit Bocquet. The work was entrusted to Atelier Automobiles Anciennes Dominique Tessier, who embarked on a meticulous two-year restoration, with the strictest attention to detail paid. The beautiful Delahaye was again brought down to a bare chassis with literally every single nut and bolt receiving scrutiny. Period photographs provided by Claude Figoni allowed Tessier to restore the nose back to its original shape as shown at the Paris Salon, complete with the V-shaped front bumper and patriotic tri-color grille. The grille was particularly important, as Joseph Figoni used it as a show of pride for his adopted home country during the tumultuous years leading up to World War II. Mr. O’Quinn’s untimely passing meant the Delahaye saw little use since the restoration. It was sold to a new owner who subsequently performed extensive mechanical sorting to the Cotal Pre-Select gearbox, rear axle and electrical system. Subtle details such as window winders and door latches have been painstakingly refined to ensure they operate as new. This magnificent and highly correct Delahaye 135 MS has been fully shaken down and sorted, and today presents in stunning condition in its original colors of creamy-white over a red leather interior piped in white. The restoration, both cosmetic and mechanical, is to world-class concours standards and the car has enjoyed success on the show field, shown at Pebble Beach in 2016, Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in 2017 (Best in Class), and Ault Park Concours in 2017 (Best in Show). Rarely does the opportunity to acquire a genuine Figoni et Falaschi Delahaye 135 MS coupe present itself. This magnificent motorcar brings with it an incredible pedigree with some of the most famous collectors in the world, as well as the significance of being the very machine that Joseph Figoni chose to show off his talents at the Paris Auto Salon. The highly desirable and matching numbers racing-specification engine returns genuine 100MPH performance, while the sorted nature of the underpinnings ensures it is safe and enjoyable to drive. But the star of the show is the flamboyant, breathtaking coachwork, making this Delahaye 135 MS the ideal candidate for important concours events the world over.

    Last update: 7 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1932 Ford V8 Phaeton

    $68,500(£53,217.65)

    Henry Ford was never one to shy away from a challenge. Following the unmitigated success of the Model T and the Model A that followed, Ford took a bold step of introducing the first low-cost, mass-produced V8 car in the midst of the worst economic conditions America had ever encountered. The Model A had been a strong seller, but four-cylinder cars were beginning to fall out of favor with buyers and the V8 Ford proved to be exactly what they were looking for. Styling for the car fell to the capable hands of Henry’s son Edsel Ford. Where Henry was the pragmatist, Edsel was driven by a more creative force, and he possessed a keen eye for style. For the 1932 Ford, Edsel utilized the design experience he gained at Lincoln – a wise move that brought influence from the Ford’s most exclusive division into the realm of the everyday car. The styling was finely honed and quite pretty with flowing front fenders and a subtle V-shaped radiator grille. Ford had once again struck a chord with buyers, producing a beautiful car and bringing V8 power to the people; something that would previously have been completely out of reach of the average buyer. As with previous models, a number of body styles were available from the Ford catalog. Closed cars included the Tudor and Fordor sedans, four-seat Victoria and the rumble seat Coupe. Open cars included the Phaeton and Roadster. All models shared the same basic styling that, despite being a one-year-only design, would go on to become an icon. The “deuce” was hugely popular and remained desirable for years to come, becoming the quintessential Hot Rod and forming the basis for so many legendary custom cars.  And while it is so often the archetypal hot rod that most people think of when imagining a 1932 Ford, the simple and elegant lines of the original are what earned its status as one of the most important and seminal classic cars of the 1930s. This lovely 1932 Ford Model 18 V8 Phaeton is a very fine example that has been carefully restored to period specification. It is a very handsome car, wearing a lovely restoration by the late William Lassiter collection of West Palm Beach, Florida. It has remained totally stock, having escaped the modifications that afflict many similar cars. The body is finished in Medium Maroon over black fenders and feature lines. Bright red wheels provide a highlight and gold coachlines tie the color scheme together nicely. Paint quality is excellent, and the body is crisp and straight, having been exceptionally well maintained in fine condition since the restoration was completed. The body features dual sidemount spares, an original option in 1932, as well as a trunk rack and finely restored brightwork. The spacious cabin is trimmed in brown to a very correct standard. The seat upholstery remains in attractive condition, showing little in the way of wear or use. Door panels and the elegantly simple dash are correct and again, in fine order with all switchgear functioning as expected. A high quality LeBaron Bonney top in khaki looks great against the paint scheme and the top frame is straight, sound and works as it should. Should touring be a priority, a canvas trunk rests on the trunk rack to handle additional luggage. The engine bay is beautifully presented and highly correct with original type fittings, wiring and details. The little flathead V8 starts easily and runs strong, emitting the signature burble and smooth, easy-going nature that came to define Fords of the 30s. The engine is backed by a 3-speed manual gearbox, and the fully restored chassis is well sorted and tidy. These truly are delightful cars to drive that feel much younger than their 85 years might suggest. The V8 engine is a marvel of smoothness, delivering its power early and with minimal drama. Four wheel brakes and a proven chassis design translate into a controlled ride and safe stopping. Combine that with light steering and relatively compact dimensions and it’s no wonder why early Ford V8 enthusiasts so love driving their cars. This fine example’s older restoration has been maintained to a very high standard and remains in beautiful condition, ready for casual show or regular touring. It is a great family classic that as beautiful as it is historically important.  

    Last update: 7 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1931 Cadillac 355A Fleetwood Convertible Coupe

    $169,500(£131,684.55)

    By the time General Motors acquired Cadillac in 1909, Henry M. Leland’s company had already established itself as a leader in innovation, mechanical sophistication and luxurious quality. That spirit continued under the auspices of General Motors as it is Cadillac that brought consumers the first electric starter, the first electric lamps, the first synchromesh transmission, the first dual-plane crankshaft V8 and even the first V16 engine. From their earlies models, Cadillac was renowned for their exceptional build quality and elegant style and General Motors proudly placed them at the pinnacle of their product line where they remain to this day. Cadillac was riding a wave of success going into the 1930s. A wise decision to include a “junior” brand (LaSalle) kept the company afloat as the economy faltered. They entered the decade with a heady confidence that spawned the incredible V16 and V12 models. But Cadillac’s mainstay for the 1930s was the 355 series; an 8-cylinder model manufactured between 1931 and 1935. It was available in variety of standard body styles that ranged from a formal limousine to a sporting 2 door roadster. Cadillac’s model naming system meant the model name coincided with the engine size, but for some reason that changed in 1931 as the 355 carried over the Series 353’s 5.8 liter, 353 cubic inch V8 L-head engine. Output was a stout 95 horsepower, plenty enough to give the big Cadillac very respectable performance for its day and earn Cadillac strong sales, with more than 10,000 examples built for ’31. 1930s elegance abounds with this fine 1931 Cadillac 355A Convertible Coupe. This former CCCA Premier Award-winning example has been fully restored to a high standard and remains in excellent condition today. It is finished in an attractive combination of deep maroon over black, with a set of complementary deep maroon wire wheels. It is a lovely machine with fine quality paintwork and detailing. Of the eleven standard body styles available, the Convertible Coupe by Fleetwood ranks among the most desirable on the 355 chassis. Its sporting, elegant appearance recalls carefree playboys enjoying the trappings of their wealth as the roaring twenties came to a close. The convertible coupe combined the style and open air experience of the roadster, but with the additional comfort provided by roll up side windows and a more substantial folding roof and more luxurious trim. As with most 355-series Cadillacs, our example is well-equipped with dual sidemount spares topped with Cadillac mirrors, a mesh radiator stone guard, Goddess mascot and a pair of Senior Trippe Light driving lamps. While the restoration is approaching two decades old, the exterior cosmetics remain very strong, and this example presents very well indeed. The interior is trimmed in beautiful tan leather in excellent condition on the front seat, rumble seat, door cards and kick panels. Woodgrain trim caps the doors and dash, and the instrument fascia features a beautiful Art-Deco sunburst pattern that is the signature of the 355 Series. Original instruments remain in excellent order and all switchgear and controls function as they should. Fitment and quality of the detailing is exemplary, as one would expect from a former CCCA award winner. The convertible top is trimmed in tan canvas, with excellent fit and easy, smooth operation of the frame. Cadillac’s venerable 353 cubic inch V8 is very nicely presented in the engine compartment. It is correctly finished in porcelain-like black with correct hardware, hose clamps and detailing. This should rank as one of Cadillacs greatest engines, as it provides smooth, reliable running and outstanding performance for the era. In fact, the 355-V8 offered performance that was nearly on par with the headline-grabbing V12 and V16 cars, thanks in large part to much lighter weight when compared to its multi-cylinder stablemates. Likewise, handling and braking were more predictable as there was less weight over the front axle. The three speed synchromesh transmission makes for easy operation and strong four wheel brakes provide peace of mind in virtually all conditions. Our example is a fine running machine, needing nothing to be enjoyed on the road. There is a good reason why the Cadillac 355-series is such a highly collectible motorcar. It combines the grand elegance of the early 1930s in a mechanical package that is unintimidating and approachable for even the novice enthusiast. Our example has been treated to a very high quality restoration and has been carefully tended to since and has benefited from some light recent freshening. It remains attractive enough for show, yet is well-sorted for CCCA CARavan touring. This is a fabulous all-rounder; a beautiful restoration on a beautiful automobile.  

    Last update: 18 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1956 Packard Caribbean Coupe

    $59,500(£46,225.55)

    Packard of the mid 1950s was a rather different company than it was back in the heady pre-war classic era. Sales were slowing in the face of competition by the might of GM and Ford, and a merger with Studebaker was in the works by 1954 in attempt to boost Packard’s market share and balance the books of both firms. Despite the looming trouble, Packard’s new boss swept in from GE and immediately began to emulate what Cadillac was doing across town. For 1953, Packard tossed their hat into the ring with an ultra-luxurious “personal car”; the new Caribbean was a direct answer to the Cadillac Eldorado as well as a halo model intended to restore shine to the tarnished Packard brand. The Caribbean sat above the 300, and was loaded with leather trim and luxury equipment. The first cars wore standard bodies that were modified by Mitchell-Bentley Corporation of Michigan to feature a low, wide hood scoop and fully rounded rear wheel arches. Each year, the Caribbean evolved with freshened styling and updated power to keep it in lock-step with Cadillac, though sales never topped the initial year’s 750 units. By 1956, Caribbean was its own separate line with both a coupe and convertible offered to clients and tweaked styling based on the 400. 1956 models were powered by the 375 cubic inch Packard V8, topped with dual four-barrel Rochester carburetors and producing 310 horsepower, putting it at the top of its class. Packard’s merger with Studebaker was failing, however, and by the end of 1956 the famous Detroit plant would be shut down and production moved to South Bend. The 1956 Caribbean was the last true luxury Packard, the final chapter of over a half-century of the brand. This 1956 Caribbean coupe is a fine example from the final year of true Packard production. It is one of just 263 coupes built in 1956, slightly fewer than the convertible. In classic mid-century style, it is finished in a tri-tone combination with plenty of chrome and stainless jewelry. The main body is finished in Dover White over a Scottish Heather stripe and Maltese Gray rockers. The paint quality is good on this older restoration, with a few minor flaws to be found on close inspection, yet remaining quite attractive and shiny overall. A signature of the Caribbean coupe is the white vinyl-covered roof, this car wearing very good correct grained material. Being a classic 50s luxury car, there is lots of bright trim. The chrome plating is generally quite good, showing a bit of pitting and age in a few places, but remaining quite attractive overall. Polished stainless belt moldings separate the tri-tone paint scheme and present in good condition. A set of beautiful chrome wire wheels with Packard-logo centers look just fantastic wrapped in wide whitewall tires, de rigueur for 50s flagship motoring. Inside, this Packard has a rather unique party trick – the front and rear seat cushions are reversible between leather and fabric surfaces. The cushions simply unsnap from the base, are flipped over and snapped back in place. It’s a delightful feature that harkens back to a day when designers were truly pushing the boundaries of creativity. Those reversible seats feature tri-tone leather on one side, and two-tone “metallic” fabric on the other. Upholstery quality is excellent, showing in very good order on both sides. The leather door panels are very good, as is the extensive interior brightwork, while carpets are fair. The dash is a magnificent display of mid-century modern design; its gold textured pattern interspersed with an array of chrome instruments and emblems. The padded dash top is covered in gray vinyl and in excellent condition with no signs of shrinking or cracking. The original radio remains in the dash, and the switchgear is in good order, with equipment including power windows, brakes and steering. A lovely Packard crest ignition key adds a sense of occasion to every drive. Beneath the hood is Packard’s robust and powerful 375 cubic inch V8 which is topped with dual Rochester 4bbl carburetors and a distinctive “batwing” air cleaner. In this unique Caribbean spec, the Packard V8 makes 310 horsepower, delivering that power through a push-button Ultramatic transmission. The engine bay is very well detailed with excellent quality paint finishes, and largely correct fittings such as the original glass washer bottle and accessories. This fine Caribbean coupe is a very usable and attractive example that has benefitted from regular maintenance and use. It ticks all the right boxes for fans of big American luxury cars of the 1950s; it is hugely stylish, very rare and it represents the last of the legendary line of proper Detroit-built Packards.  

    Last update: 23 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1931 Cord L-29 Cabriolet

    $325,000(£252,492.50)

    When the Auburn Automobile Company was facing an ever growing well of red ink in 1924, they realized they needed to make a drastic maneuver in order to move a glut of unsold inventory  if they had any hopes of saving the firm. Auburns were quality cars, but they were also staid and somewhat boring in the face of their competition. The board at Auburn hired a hotshot young salesman; E.L. Cord with the task of turning around their fortunes. Cord was an Auburn distributor and entrepreneur and his solution to unsold stock was as genius as it was simple. A natural showman, he simply repainted the bland Auburns in bright new colors and marketed them in retail spaces around the country. His elegant plan saved the company and as a reward, he was offered a place in management. But Cord’s ambition was much higher, and rather than accept the job, he decided full control over the company was a better deal. By1928, he was in complete control of Auburn and had begun to amass an impressive manufacturing empire that included eventually Auburn, Lycoming Engines, Checker Cab, Duesenberg, Stinson Aircraft and New York Shipbuilders, among others. Having re-invented Auburn as a leader in stylish and quality automobiles, Cord decided to add a car worthy of his own name – one that would compete with the likes of Lincoln, Packard and Stutz. In typical E.L. Cord fashion, he eschewed tradition and specified a car that was both innovative and beautiful. The L-29, as it became known, was a sleek and gloriously low slung machine, thanks to its front wheel drive and a De Dion front axle arrangement which allowed the body to be mounted very low on the chassis.  The project was spearheaded by an ex-Miller engineer who had vast experience with front-drive. The L-29 shared the 301 cubic inch Lycoming straight eight with Auburn, but with engine and three-speed transmission turned 180 degrees. The forward mounted transmission meant no tunnel was needed, and the body could be mounted low in the chassis, with a flat floor for additional passenger comfort. Performance was adequate, and thanks to the low center of gravity, handling was quite impressive. Designers took full advantage of the low body height, gracing the L-29 with an array of fabulously rakish bodies. Only 4,400 L-29s were sold between 1929 and 1932, and it remains a highly collectible icon of the Classic Era. This truly stunning 1931 L-29 Cabriolet wears a recent and extremely high-quality restoration and remains in fresh, show quality condition. The known history of this wonderful car begins in 1946 when it was purchased for a mere $750 by a Mr. Huffey of Cincinnati, Ohio. Several short term owners followed until 1953 when it was purchased by Jerry Fisher, also of Ohio. It remained with Fisher for some time until reappearing in 1969 when Hubert Wood of South Charleston, Ohio acquired it and performed an amateur-level restoration, as was quite common for the time. A new owner was found in 1980, which proceeded to drive the car to his private museum in the western United States. In 2013, the car was purchased by its last owner, and a full and comprehensive restoration was undertaken. The Cord was completely disassembled and every component carefully stripped with preservation of original parts a priority. The chassis, springs and axles were stripped and painted or powder coated. The body was carefully restored using as much of the original sheet metal as possible, with the structural wood work being replaced as needed. A striking color combination was chosen with deep maroon main body and fenders accented by black stripes and black painted wire wheels. The wheels are wrapped in blackwall tires (including the dual sidemount spares) lending the car a magnificently sporty and aggressive look. The paint quality is gorgeous, with very high quality metal work and a deep beautiful gloss. The chrome trim was similarly restored to a show-quality standard and has been expertly refitted. The cabriolet body style features a two-seat cockpit up front, with room for two occasional passengers in the rumble seat. As part of the restoration, new black leather was fitted to the seats and door cards using original works patterns. The leather is piped in dark red to complement the exterior with dramatic effect. Rear passengers are treated to the same high-quality upholstery in the rumble seat. L-29s have a magnificent dash design, with beautifully ornate panels inset into the fascia and a distinctive shift lever sprouting from the dash. This car had the instruments and dash panel fully restored to the same high level as the exterior with exquisitely detailed switchgear, textured panels and intricate dials. A new black canvas top, subtly stitched in red, has been fitted to a renewed top frame with new wooden bows and restored metal components. The big Lycoming inline eight-cylinder engine was fully rebuilt with new Babbit bearings, as well as new pistons, rings and shell bearings. It also received a new camshaft and the crankshaft was polished and balanced while the cylinder block was bored, honed and the head planed. The resulting engine is strong and exceptionally smooth, supported by freshly rebuilt cooling and charging systems. Concurrently, the transmission was carefully cleaned, inspected, resealed and re-installed with a new clutch and pressure plate. Upon reassembly, the engine assembly was correctly painted and beautifully detailed with newly plated hardware and correct fittings and wiring. A truly stunning automobile, this L-29 Cabriolet is one of the most desirable of the breed. This example still wears its original engine, original body as well as original body number and serial number tags. An unrestored original trunk rack is also included. This extremely high quality restoration done in fabulous colors makes this breathtaking Cord a very worthy candidate for show at virtually any important event.

    Last update: 28 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1943 Dodge WC51 And 1943 Harley WL

    $97,500(£75,747.75)

    Dodge’s relationship with the US Military began around 1916 when Dodge Brothers supplied touring cars to the government for use in an operation against Poncho Villa and his revolutionary soldiers from Mexico. The battle, held in May of 1916 was the first time the US Army engaged in motorized battle, earning Dodge this somewhat dubious distinction. The Dodge Brothers had earned the trust of the military and they went on to supply a number of different trucks throughout the coming years. In the late 1930s, with war in Europe looming, officials needed to update the motor fleet and Dodge was once again entrusted to build a medium duty, half-ton four-wheel-drive workhorse. The first VC-series arrived in 1940, though it was essentially a stopgap model, based on a modified civilian chassis. By the time the United States entered the war, however, the purpose built WC series was beginning to hit shore around the world. The first WC-series (WC1 through WC50) was a ½ - ton truck used as a weapons carrier or staff car, depending on the body. For 1943 it was revised again with an improved body for easier troop access, and upgraded axles and suspension allowing a ¾ ton capacity. The WC51 was powered by a 230 cubic inch flathead inline six, a stout, virtually indestructible unit that was designed to run on the worst quality fuel the world had to offer. The four wheel drive system was via an in-out transfer case (no low range) and stump-pulling ratios on the New Process gearbox meant the WC could traverse virtually any terrain regardless of cargo. The Dodge WC was every bit a faithful beast of burden as the iconic Jeep, proving itself under fire in virtually every theater of World War II. This 1943 WC51 is an incredible example, exceptionally presented with period equipment that includes a genuine 1943 Harley-Davidson WL (S/N 42-2136) military-specification motorcycle on a replica trailer. The WC51 is a first series ¾-ton version with the standard Weapons Carrier body on a 98-inch chassis. It has been thoroughly restored and impeccably detailed with appropriate accessories such as full embarkation equipment (shovel, axe, camouflage netting, jerry cans, armament cases, etc.) and presented in the colors of the 82nd Airborne division. The body is properly restored to represent the true quality of a mass produced military vehicle, the previous owner wisely avoiding over-restoration. Canvas on the cab roof and cargo bed is in excellent condition, again, appearing period correct without coming across as too new. The canvas seats, accessories and markings are highly authentic and accurately represented. Towed behind the truck is a high quality replica trailer that was built using period photographs and documentation. It is very well constructed, down to the authentic spring-dampened pintle hitch and military-spec wheels. Some creative license was taken in its construction, but it has a very authentic feel, particularly in the details such as the jerry cans and ropes. The Harley Davidson WL was discovered years ago in a barracks, in a highly original state. The previous owner carefully restored the bike with just about every available accessory for the day, while still respecting the highly original condition. The entire grouping of Dodge, Harley and trailer are authentically represented and in excellent condition. The truck runs very well, with the prodigious low-end torque (which peaks at 1000 RPM) of the 230 cubic inch inline six, making it easy and enjoyable to simply leave in top gear and cruise around. The cabin is authentically represented with basic canvas seat cushions, minimal instrumentation and simple controls. The cargo box has built-in benches for carrying the “troops” and the canvas covers on the cab and cargo box are removable. Likewise, the Harley is exceptionally tidy, clean and very well presented, down to the correct lamps, leather rifle holster and canvas “blackout” covers. Such is the level of detail on this pairing that it is difficult to put into words, this amazing rig should be seen for the astounding presentation to be fully appreciated. This is a rare opportunity to acquire a real piece of World War II history, ideally suited for classic military gatherings, for enjoyment in the countryside or as a fascinating conversation piece in a collection of historically important vehicles.  

    Last update: 29 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1931 Chrysler CG Imperial Waterhouse Victoria

    $575,000(£446,717.50)

    Soon after Walter P. Chrysler took over the ailing Maxwell Motor Company and renamed the firm Chrysler in 1924, the company adopted the name Imperial to denote his top of the line offerings. By 1931, Imperial had evolved into a unique automobile that set itself well-apart from the rest of the Chrysler line. The new for 1931 model, known as the CG Imperial, sat atop a massive 145-inch wheelbase chassis, and the body was styled to give a low-slung and rakish appearance. Clearly influenced by the Cord L-29, the new CG Imperial featured broad, sweeping curves and a low-mounted, swept-back radiator grille. Motivation came via a mighty 385 cubic-inch straight eight producing 125-horsepower. The combination of that powerful eight-cylinder engine, coupled with advanced steering and suspension geometry, and four wheel hydraulic brakes gave the Imperial surprisingly good road manners and 100mph ability. Despite its proven ability, the CG Imperial remained a very limited car with only 339 examples built over a three year period. Considered by many to be the most beautiful Chrysler ever built, the CG Imperial is also a favorite among fans of American Classics who prefer to drive their cars as intended; such are their exquisite road manners and outstanding performance. Of the 339 CG Imperials built between 1931 and 1933, just 99 of those were shipped to coachbuilders outside of Chrysler’s favored circle. Of those 99 cars, approximately six found their way to Waterhouse and Co. of Webster, Massachusetts. Waterhouse was a relative flash in the pan in the coachbuilding world, in business only from 1928-1933, but in that time they produced a series of gorgeous and exquisitely built bodies. Their signature body style was the Convertible Victoria which Waterhouse perfected by only using long-wheelbase chassis, allowing for long, graceful lines as well as additional space for stowage to of the top when folded, giving a cleaner and elegant look. With the top in place, the low roofline, long blind quarters and boot between the rear fenders made for a striking combination – especially when sitting atop the utterly gorgeous Chrysler CG chassis. We are very pleased to offer this 1931 Chrysler CG Imperial Waterhouse Convertible Victoria, a stunning example wearing highly prized coachwork. The known history of this fabulous motorcar, chassis CG 3843, dates back to 1939 when Mr. Calvin Collins of New York purchased it from the McCormick Garage. The Collins family enjoyed the CG for several years until the car was taken off the road. Repeated war-era scrap drives threatened the car’s very existence, but Calvin’s young son Scott Collins recognized how very special his family’s Chrysler was, and pleaded its case to be spared from the scrapper. The car was holed up in the family barn as young Scott dreamed of returning the car to its former glory. Over the years, parts were collected as needed and finally, in 2009, after a remarkable 70 years in the Collins family, Scott offered the car to the respected Canadian restorer Richard Grenon who jumped at the opportunity to purchase it. Upon closer inspection, Grenon and his son discovered the chassis was in remarkably good condition considering what it had endured, and the aluminum body had survived the years quite well with minimal damage. Much of the structural wood had to be replaced, though he found many of the surviving wood components and smaller chrome items stamped with “163”, the original Waterhouse job number. Over 6,000 hours were spent painstakingly restoring CG 3843, and today it is presented in its original color scheme of a black main body with unique caramel colored side stripes, chassis and wheels. Upon its completion, the car was shown at the Ault Park Concours where it was awarded a class win, as well as the William K. Victor Best of Show Award, an incredible achievement for a car finished just days prior. CG 3843 remains in stunning condition, having been carefully maintained since the restoration and shown in numerous events including the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 2012. As one would expect from such a restoration, paint and finish quality is outstanding with hardly a flaw to be found. The chrome is also beautifully presented with show-quality plating on the radiator grille, bumpers and minor trim. The body is minimally adorned, which imparts a very European flavor, particularly in combination with the low ride height and black-wall Firestone tires – originally specified by Waterhouse to highlight the beautiful coachwork. Dual Chrysler-branded mirrors top the side mount spares, and a Gazelle mascot sits atop the radiator; a fitting symbol for such a sporting machine. The interior is trimmed in incredibly supple caramel-colored leather as original, executed to a concours quality standard. Likewise, the black canvas top and canvas side-mount covers are expertly fitted. A tan leather top boot is included to cover the soft top when it is folded and the windscreen features an interesting fabric exterior sun visor. The cockpit is surrounded with subtle but fine quality wood trim, while the dash is beautifully elegant – a simple body colored panel fitted with exquisitely restored instrumentation. One signature of the Waterhouse design is the pair of courtesy lights built in to the top frame, a nice touch for rear seat passengers. The CG Imperial’s 385 Cubic Inch inline eight cylinder engine is of course, up to the standard of the rest of the car with correct porcelain-black finishes and paint colors on the engine and cylinder head. Detailing on the ancillaries is exquisite; the engine presenting as a stunning piece of industrial art. Thankfully, the restorer took the time to ensure it performs as well as it looks and has since proven itself on events such as the Pebble Beach Tour d’Elegance. The comfortable seating position, relatively light steering and powerful four-wheel hydraulic brakes make the CG an outstanding machine for touring. It remains in top condition, having just this year taken Best in Show honors at the Muckenthaler Concours, as well as the Huntington Beach Concours. It was also awarded 99.5 points and 1st in class (out of 24 cars!) at the San Marino Motor Classic CCCA event, also in 2017. The CG Imperial is no doubt one of the most alluring Chryslers ever produced, and this example, with its achingly beautiful coachwork by Waterhouse and gorgeous presentation make it among the most desirable of the breed. With only three known examples to survive, this represents an extremely rare opportunity to acquire one of the finest and most important Chrysler CG Imperials extant.      

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1936 Lincoln K Convertible Sedan

    $89,500(£69,532.55)

    Lincoln Motor Car Company’s flagship model in the 1930s was the prestigious Model K. When introduced in 1931, Lincoln was under the full control of the Ford Motor Company, as Henry Leland had been pushed out by a revenge-seeking Henry Ford. Henry put his son Edsel in charge and almost immediately, Lincoln enjoyed a turnaround. The flagship Model K hit the showrooms in 1931 powered by an L-head V8 engine. Power was more than adequate but with ever increasing pressure to build multi-cylinder engines such as the V12 and V16, Ford swiftly responded with the addition of the V12 Model KB in 1932, followed by the smaller displacement KA. The early years of the Great Depression meant that sales were slim, but the V12 remained the signature of the K-series through 1939. The biggest change coming in 1934 when the two available sizes of V12 engines were combined into one singular 414 cubic inch unit. Most of America’s luxury car manufacturers had added entry level lines to boost the bottom line during the Great Depression. Packard had the Junior series, Cadillac offered LaSalle and, while late to the game, Ford introduced the Zephyr range to bridge the gap between top line Fords and the prestigious Model K in 1936. The new Zephyr was also powered by a V12 engine, and was surely stealing sales from its older sibling, but Lincoln continued to offer the Model K for high end buyers, who now had 17 different custom body styles to select from. For the 1936 K-series (the KA and KB monikers had been dropped), styling was tweaked with a raked windscreen, revised radiator grille and optional stamped steel wheels. On the mechanical side, the 414 cubic inch flathead V-12 engine was updated with hydraulic lifters and a revised cam shaft and placed further forward in the chassis sitting to allow for more passenger room. The resulting car was elegant and understated, yet it still had an imposing presence that demanded attention. This 1936 Lincoln K wears a rare and desirable Convertible Sedan body from the Lincoln catalog. It wears an older restoration that has held up very well, although it is showing its age in a few places. The body is in very nice condition, with straight panels and good fitment of the doors and hood. Paint quality is good, though some small touchups have been made here and there. The colors are indeed a bit unconventional, but the body style itself is quite attractive, with its sloping rear trunk, low roof line, and curvaceous front fenders with dual-sidemount spares. The spare wheels are housed within metal covers that are topped with side-view mirrors. A greyhound mascot adorns the radiator grill, while out back a trunk rack supplements the integrated trunk in the body. Chrome bumpers are in quite good condition, and the painted wire wheels are adorned with chrome center caps and wide whitewall tires. Doors open with a satisfying quality to reveal the brown leather interior which, while older, remains supple and clean. The seats and carpets are in good condition front and rear, exhibiting signs of use but not excessively worn. Instruments appear to be in original condition, along with much of the switchgear. A later turn signal switch has been added for safety. Interior fittings are in good condition and the chrome on the window winders, door handles and other areas remains very presentable. In the rear, a robe rail is affixed to the back of the front seat, and again, the leather is in good presentable condition. The tan canvas convertible top is piped in brown to complement the interior, there is a small repair on the top, but it remains attractive and serviceable. The engine compartment, while not concours, is clean and nicely detailed, the big 414 cubic inch flathead V12 engine starts easily and runs very well, with the signature smooth, virtually silent idle that defines these 1930s multi-cylinder engines. Very few of these open cars were originally sold, since in 1936, a Model K 7-passenger Limousine cost a rather steep $4,700. This more complex Convertible Sedan would have come in above that. Given the competition from within by the Zephyr, it is no wonder that sales of the K were limited. This 1936 Lincoln K features rare and desirable coachwork, and is a very enjoyable car for CCCA CARavans, local shows, or Sunday drives.

    Last update: 29 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1949 Volkswagen Beetle Sedan

    $69,500(£53,994.55)

    It could easily be argued that the Volkswagen Beetle (officially designated the Type 1) is the most popular and most recognizable car ever produced. Like the Ford Model T before it, the Volkswagen put a nation (and the world) on wheels thanks to its low cost and elegant mechanical simplicity. Despite its somewhat dubious roots within the Third Reich, the VW Beetle proved immensely popular in the post war years, particularly in a recovering Europe. In the US market, this funny little rear-engine car took some time to catch on, but once it did, it became immersed in popular culture, particularly through the 1960s. Many great mechanics and race car builders got their start tinkering with Beetles thanks to their simplicity, ease of service and surprising potential. A staggering 21.5 million examples were built between 1938 and 2003, becoming the longest running, highest selling, single-platform vehicle in history. From the first car to the last, changes were made not for the sake of change but always with the purpose of improvement and refinement. 1949 marked a major milestone for VW, as the year the very first Beetle was imported to the US market by the daring and brilliant Max Hoffman. Max Hoffman Imports had a bustling showroom in New York, and he was one of the most influential players in the European motoring industry, responsible for translating American tastes to European companies, along the way ensuring the success of companies like BMW, Alfa Romeo, Mercedes-Benz and Porsche established themselves in the fickle American marketplace. While the Beetles of the 60s and 70s are most familiar to the general public, it is the cars built in the 1950s and earlier that attract the most attention from serious collectors and enthusiasts. They are considered the purest of form, and are also among the rarest given the lower production numbers and high attrition rate. True to the original design by Dr. Porsche, the shape is subtle yet complex, with form following function in a classic Teutonic manner. The earliest years of Volkswagen production were limited, with production truly gearing up after WWII was over and Germany was in recovery. This 1949 Volkswagen Type 1 is a beautifully and recently restored example finished true to original specification. The body is outstanding, with lovely Pearl Grey paint laid down over excellent panels. Decklids fit beautifully and the doors shut solidly with excellent gaps. It has a wonderful, simple charm to it, and the paint work is expertly finished, carefully executed to not appear too glossy but with a period appropriate sheen that lends the car a factory-fresh appearance. The bumpers are excellent, as are lamp bezels on the correct Bosch lenses. Plain, painted steel wheels wear blackwall tires and simple chrome hub caps emblazoned with the VW logo. Semaphores in the B-pillars harken back to the car’s prewar roots and the distinct lack of trim and brightwork recalls the VW’s singular purpose as the car of the people. Charming simplicity continues inside where the accommodations are about as basic as you can get, however the impeccable quality of the restoration shines through in expertly fit fabric seat upholstery and fine quality detailing front and rear. Kick panels and sills are covered in German squareweave carpet and the floors lined in fluted rubber mat. The dash is about as uncomplicated as you can get, housing a speedometer, glovebox and little else. What switchgear there is (for headlamps, wipers and turn signals) is correct. The cabin is the perfect antithesis to today’s needlessly complex automobiles that are full of distractions; this is a tool for driving, something you use to get from point to point as efficiently as possible, and yet the VW accomplishes its purpose in such an endearing way. A correct 1131 cc horizontally opposed four cylinder sits out behind the rear axle line. The engine number (1-0135937) corresponds with both the chassis and serial numbers on the data tag and stampings in the body. The engine is carefully and properly detailed with period appropriate parts such as the brown-top Bosch coil and distributor cap, and black lacquered ignition leads. Engine sheet metal is beautifully restored and painted in a semi-gloss black as correct. It is exceptionally clean and tidy, showing almost no use since the restoration. This is a beautifully presented Beetle; a highly desirable example from the early days of this iconic machine and a pure, simple joy to drive. This example’s fresh and immaculately prepared restoration make it immediately ready for show and enjoyment.  

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1938 Cadillac V16 Convertible Coupe

    $339,500(£263,757.55)

    Cadillac’s V16 range first appeared in 1930, and after initially strong sales, production had dwindled as the American economy struggled and such lavish motorcars were generally frowned upon by even the wealthiest of buyers. However, in spite of its costly nature, the V16 still served its role as a halo model for Cadillac, so it remained available through the decade. For the 1938 model year, Cadillac completely redesigned the car with an all new engine and body design. Displacing 431 cubic inches, the new V16 was a more conventional design, with a simple side-valve configuration in a rather unusual 135-degree cylinder bank angle. The engine produced 185 horsepower (about 10 more than the old unit) and weighed a staggering 250 pounds less than the original V16. It was also significantly cheaper for Cadillac to produce, and therefore more profitable. As America was recovering from the Great Depression, this proved the right move for Cadillac and for buyers who wanted the prestige of the famous V16, yet in a slightly more affordable package. Sixteen cylinder Series 90 models rode on the same basic chassis and 141 inch wheelbase as the V8 Series 75, which allowed for sharing of bodies from the Fleetwood and Fisher catalog. Twelve catalog body styles were available for the 1938-1939 model years, all designed under the guidance of the masterful Bill Mitchell, protégé of Harley Earl. Of those bodies, one of the rarest and most expensive was Style Number 9067, the stunning Convertible Coupe by Fleetwood. The streamline era was taking full effect by 1938, with the front fenders and radiator grille becoming fully enveloped into one. Headlights were still separately mounted but were soon to be fully integrated into the fenders as well. Dual sidemount spares were still fitted, but concealed beneath painted steel covers. Stylistically, the 1938 Cadillac bridged the gap between the traditional classic era and the post-war streamlined style. The Convertible coupe in particular, has incredible presence; it is a large car, with its two-seat body style stretched dramatically over the 141-inch wheelbase chassis. Just ten examples were built in 1938 making it among the rarest and most desirable of the series. This beautiful Cadillac Series 90 is one of those ten original Convertible Coupes bodied by Fleetwood in 1938. It is a very attractive car wearing a high-quality older restoration that has recently been sorted for reliable and enjoyable touring. Original build sheets indicate this car (engine number 5270250) was first delivered to Rochester New York, painted in Moleskin Gray as indicated on both the build sheet and the original Fleetwood trim tag. By the 1960s the car had found its way to Pennsylvania when it was discovered along the side of the PA Turnpike by noted early CCCA member Ted Johnson. Mr. Johnson rescued the Cadillac from the roadside and had it restored by George Holman of Massachusetts. Mr. Holman subsequently purchased the car, eventually trading it to Rick Carroll, a well-known collector from Jensen Beach, Florida. Today, this beautiful Cadillac presents in very good condition, still wearing its older restoration well. The bright red paint suits the sporting nature of the body quite well, and while it does show extensive cracking in the lacquer finish, it remains glossy and attractive. The body fit is good, and the panels very straight, showing the car was properly restored and carefully tended to since. Chrome trim remains generally very good with a few areas of minor pitting or bubbling found here and there, but overall still glossy and attractive. Bumpers are straight and gorgeous and the lovely cast grille shows only the slightest of age. A pair of Guide Super Ray driving lamps are fitted and the car retains its correct original headlamp lenses. On the whole, it is a lovely, imposing car that turns heads and while it shows its age in places, remains quite attractive overall. Inside, the brown leather shows just some minor creasing and slight cracking, with some wear evident around the edges of the front seats. It retains a pleasing patina that does not detract from the inviting, usable nature of this Cadillac. Door panels and kick panels are in excellent condition and pair of jump seats are fitted in the rear for occasional rear passengers. The woodgrain dash is beautifully preserved with excellent finish and lovely original instruments. Paint and chrome finishes inside are very good, as is the original Banjo-style steering wheel. Cadillac’s 431 cubic inch L-head V16 is very nicely presented, with correct type finishes and paint. The presentation is excellent and the engine has benefitted from recent servicing and sorting. Some of the work performed in the last few years includes a full fuel system flush with a new fuel tank, rebuilt shock absorbers, new front springs, new wide whitewall tires, rebuilt brake hydraulics, rebuilt carburetor and a full chassis service with cleaned and greased lubrication points. It now performs beautifully and is a delight to drive, especially given the 185 horsepower output and silken delivery from the V16. An approved CCCA Full Classic, this exceedingly rare and imposing Series 90 is an excellent candidate for CARavan touring or for simply wafting along your favorite roads, enjoying the effortless power and impeccable style of this beautiful Cadillac.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1937 Cadillac Series 75 Town Sedan

    $41,500(£32,241.35)

    Cadillac’s Series 75 debuted in 1936, hitting the market as a step above the standard Series 60, which itself had just been introduced as the entry-level Cadillac model. The Series 70 and 75 (70 having the shorter wheelbase) featured new, streamlined styling refined by Fleetwood as well as a new monoblock, 346 cubic inch V8. The monoblock engine incorporated the crankcase and cylinders in one casting, which was topped by L-type cylinder heads. The new engine was both lighter and more powerful than the old unit, and it was continuously refined until the 331 cubic inch overhead valve engine debuted in 1949. The monoblock Cadillac engine was renowned for smooth and reliable running – as well as its power. The US military even adopted a version of it to power the M5 Stuart light tank during WWII. Generally speaking, as the top-line V8 powered cars (the Sixteen was still available through 1940), 70-series cars were equipped with formal bodies, given their upmarket stature and price. As before, Fisher and Fleetwood were the preferred in-house coachbuilders for Cadillac, and a wide variety of styles were offered on this high-end chassis. 1937 saw the Series 75 get some very minor styling tweaks over the previous year, most notably, an intricate and attractive egg crate die-cast grille that flowed into the streamlined hood. Styling changes were minimal but they added up to a car that looked clean and well resolved. The engine was enhanced with a lighter flywheel and other refinements for additional reliability and power output. As before, Fisher or Fleetwood would supply bodies, however by 1938 the high-end Fleetwood bodies would be the only option for the Series 75. This 1937 Series 75 Town Sedan wears coachwork by Fleetwood; a lovely and elegant design that embodies the early days of the streamlined era. Recently from an estate, this Cadillac was used regularly until a short time ago, and it remains in generally good order as a sound, solid example that could benefit from some light freshening. All steel bodywork is finished in dark blue paint which is generally good, showing a few flaws and wear in places, but remains shiny and attractive. Likewise, the brightwork is in good order with straight bumpers and body trim, and average-quality plating with a few pits appearing in places. Running board rubbers are in good condition and the lower trim on the driver’s running board shows a few dings. The original wheels are shod with wide-whitewall tires as is appropriate for this formal body style, and original hubcaps appear in good order. Dual side-mount spares are hidden with painted metal covers and an integrated trunk round out this elegantly styled Cadillac. Inside, the cabin is trimmed in tan broadcloth front and rear. The seats and door panels appear in fair condition with no rips, tears or other severe wear, however the upholstery is a bit tired in places and could use some attention. Tan carpets are serviceable but would perhaps best be replaced. The dash is finished in the same blue as the exterior, fitted with factory correct instruments which appear to be in good original condition. Wood windscreen surrounds and door tops are in generally good condition save for one area of damage on the passenger side of the dash. Rear passengers are treated to spacious accommodations and the lack of a divider window allows for more space and comfort up front for the driver. Rear doors, quarter glass and the rear window are all originally fitted with retractable silk blinds for privacy. Details in the rear include a folding rear arm rest, grab straps, robe rail and lovely art-deco styled courtesy lamps in the C-pillars. The same tan broadcloth used up front lines the rear compartment and presents in similar condition; usable as is, though it could also benefit from a spruce up. The engine compartment is nicely detailed, and the car runs and drives well.  Despite the years it has under its belt, the restoration seems to have held up well in mechanical terms, with a solid and sound undercarriage. The car was used regularly by the previous owner until his passing, which led to a period of disuse in recent years. The 1937 Cadillac Series 75 is a recognized CCCA Full Classic and these cars make wonderful choices for tours, especially if family and friends want to share in the experience. Just 4,332 Series 75s were produced in 1937, with only a small portion of those wearing this handsome Town Sedan body. This is a sound, family-friendly Cadillac that has room for improvement if so desired, or it can simply be enjoyed as is. Either way, this Series 75 represents a strong value and is an excellent gateway to the world of Full Classics.  

    Last update: 27 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1987 Mercedes-Benz 560SL Convertible

    $48,500(£37,679.65)

    The perennial Mercedes-Benz R107 series is one of the most iconic luxury cars of the 70s and 80s. In movies and television, the SL roadster was often the car seen cruising Rodeo Drive or through Miami Beach. It was a car that defined the marque and the era. Such was its enduring charm; it is surprising to recall the car was first introduced back in 1971. Known internally and by loyal fans as the R107 (the four seat SLC was dubbed C107), the car was designed in house at Sindelfingen by Karl Wilfert and his team. The styling was understated but elegant yet highly sophisticated. Mercedes-Benz’s obsession with occupant and pedestrian safety through the 1960s led to a great number of subtle yet important design features that would trickle down to the rest of the line during the coming two decades. The SL roadster spoke to a new breed of luxury roadster buyers and went on to become the longest-running production passenger car in Mercedes’ history. Mechanically, the R107 took a page from its predecessors, riding on a unique platform but sharing engines and suspension components with its sedan counterparts. It was also incredibly well-built, with a solidity and over-engineered feeling that few manufacturers past or present could match. Through the years of production, Mercedes continually refined the formula, adding ever increasing displacement V8 engines, improved materials and refined design. The ultimate model in the R107 SL range is the 560SL. The big 5.6 liter V8 from the S-Class was shoehorned into the SL’s engine bay to create a sporting car that was capable of 150mph performance while remaining quiet, composed and sophisticated. It was the sports car for those who preferred not be ruffled when arriving at the club in style. This 1987 560SL is a desirable later production example, finished in rarely seen and elegant colors of Diamond Blue (3550) over cream beige leather and a dark blue top. It is a highly original and very well maintained example that has covered a scant 31,261 miles over the past 30 years. The body is very straight and crisp, with no corrosion and factory precise panel gaps. A clean Carfax report shows no known history of accident damage, and continuous ownership for the past 17 years. The paint quality is excellent, showing only a few very minor touch ups. Bumpers are excellent, with original chrome plating and very good original extensions and rubber trim. Original Bosch fog lamps are fitted to the front bumper, and all other lights and lenses are excellent with no cracks or chips. Original Sekurit glass is in fine order, including on the removable hard top. A subtle cream double coach stripe ties the color scheme together. Wheels are factory original disc-style wrapped in very good Pirelli rubber. The wheels are in excellent condition, the correct bright silver finish showing virtually no pitting and no signs of curb rash. Doors open with that signature Mercedes-Benz solidity to reveal an outstanding and lovely interior. Beige leather (code 275) is clean and very tidy with no rips, tears or undue wear, beautifully complementing the Diamond Blue paint. Only the slightest bit of wear can be found on the driver’s outer bolster upon close inspection. Carpets and overmats are excellent as is the headlining on the hard top. The original Becker Grand Prix cassette player remains in place. Original wood trim presents very well on the excellent dash, with only a slight crack forming in the lacquer on the center console wood, which does little to detract from the otherwise excellent interior. Blue German canvas soft top is in very good order as well and functions as it should. The chassis and engine bay exhibit factory original surfaces, accessories and hardware which are in appropriate condition for such an exceedingly well-maintained and low-mileage example. Original books and some service records are included, as are the original hard-top removal tools and a hard top storage stand. The big 5.6 liter V8 runs strong, with plenty of low end torque, and smooth effortless running around town. With the hard top in place, the 560SL becomes a silent, unflustered Grand Touring car, while folding the soft top transforms it into a thrilling open sports car. The 560SL is among the best performing of the R107 breed, with excellent, stable handling and mile-crushing highway ability all wrapped in a timeless and refined body style. As such, values and demand for exceptional examples such as this one have been steadily increasing. This is a beautifully presented, well maintained and low-mileage 560SL in gorgeous colors that will surely satisfy the most meticulous enthusiast.  

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1937 Packard Twelve Dual Cowl Phaeton

    $650,000(£504,985)

    In 1937, Packard produced a very respectable 122,593 cars, a number which they were rightly quite proud of. Of that total, however, a mere 1,300 left the famous Detroit plant with the spectacular twelve-cylinder engine. Period press accolades declared these later series Packard Twelves (1932-1939) as “the nearest thing to steam” such was their seamless, silken and relentless power delivery. The 437 cubic-inch V12 was a beautiful design, said to have inspired Enzo Ferrari to power his own cars with 60-degree V12 engines. Producing a full 175 horsepower, it equaled that by made by the mighty Cadillac Sixteen. By 1937, the Fifteenth-series Packard Twelve had gained independent front suspension adapted from the Junior models, as well as four wheel vacuum-assisted hydraulic brakes and a synchromesh transmission, making it one of the most satisfying of all pre-war Packards to drive, even by today’s modern standards. The 1932-1939 Packard Twelves are still considered by many to be among the finest American automobiles ever produced. Packard traditionally eschewed ornate, showy bodies in favor of sophisticated style and mechanical superiority, and the Twelve was no different. Of the approximately 5,800 examples produced, most were fitted with coachwork that was sophisticated and stylish, but erred toward the conservative side. But a few examples of the Twelve did manage to get into the hands of the more extravagant buyers and were fitted with flamboyant bodies, perhaps the best known among these was LeBaron. Inspired by the great 1934 Packard Twelve LeBaron Sport Phaeton, this striking 1937 Packard is a genuine 15th Series Twelve, wearing custom one-off coachwork and presented in stunning condition. This particular chassis was originally sold by Los Angeles dealer Earl C. Anthony, Inc. wearing limousine coachwork. Somewhere along the way, the limousine body was removed and never replaced. Many years later, the chassis was discovered on the East Coast, mechanically complete but missing most of the rear body. The car was purchased by a German collector, who commissioned the mechanical restoration as well as the design and construction of the gorgeous body it now wears. The car was handed over to Trevor Hirst Restoration and Coachwork in the U.K., where the chassis was carefully stripped down, and, alongside the engine, fully restored using many genuine parts sourced from American Packard experts. The owner drew his inspiration from the LeBaron Sport Phaeton which was an earlier design than his 1937 chassis, posing some issues with proportion and fit which were overcome using sophisticated computer-aided design, as well measurements taken directly from a genuine example in California. An intricate ash frame was built to support the skin, and the panels were crafted using traditional English coachbuilding techniques. Details such as the windscreen frames, door hinges and convertible top frame were engineered and hand built in Mr. Hirst’s workshop. The level of detail and quality of the craftsmanship is truly astounding, and in spite of the modern time line, this is a truly coachbuilt Packard in the most traditional sense. The expert workmanship shines via the beautiful and visually striking metallic indigo paintwork. The modern color suits the flamboyant LeBaron-inspired lines beautifully, and the carefully selected light cream interior provides a lovely contrast. It rides on a set of steel wheels with chrome beauty rings and chrome Packard Twelve wheel covers, which are mounted with wide-whitewall bias-ply tires for the proper road feel and handling. The chrome plating is executed to concours standards with the big bumpers, radiator slats and headlamps presenting in beautiful order. The interior is equally stunning, trimmed in high quality cream colored leather on the seats and door panels. Beautiful oatmeal carpets are bound in matching leather, and the fit and finish is excellent. The dash is finished to a very high standard in lovely light burl wood with an original Packard Twelve fascia housing modern instruments. The rear cowl hinges upward for easy access to the passenger compartment and the soft top is fully functional, covered with a dark blue canvas boot when folded. Mechanically, this car was built to be driven. It starts readily and runs strong, rewarding the driver with excellent road manners. The specification was enhanced with a large capacity fuel tank as well as a stainless steel exhaust system and the engine is properly detailed in correct Packard Green to original spec. It has been regularly used by the most recent owner and it is reported to be a thoroughly enjoyable car for touring. The quality of the construction and beautiful presentation would surely make it welcome in show events with new coachwork classes, or simply an outstanding and gorgeous machine to drive and enjoy with the whole family. Regardless of how you choose to enjoy it, this is a genuine Packard Twelve in excellent mechanical order wearing a stunningly beautiful body, hand built by a gifted craftsman at great expense.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1972 Intermeccanica Italia Spyder

    $175,000(£135,957.50)

    The story of Intermeccanica is a long and roundabout tale of good ideas, roadblocks, hiccups, missteps and just a bit of success. The company was founded in Turin, Italy in 1959 by Frank and Paula Reisner; two enthusiasts who had a particular love for all things Italian. Frank had experience with designing racing cars for Giannini, and their new business, named Intermeccanica, initially focused on tuning parts such as carburetor kits and big-bore exhaust systems for Fiat, Peugeot, Simca and other smallbore European cars. They soon tried their hands at building their own race cars in the form of a Peugeot-powered Formula Junior, soon shifting focus to road cars with a small, alloy bodied car based on the tiny 500cc Daimler-Styer-Puch. Much like what Carlo Abarth did with Fiat, the IMP (Intermeccanica-Puch) was based on a humble chassis, fitted a lightweight alloy body and tuned for rallying and circuit racing. The IMP managed moderate success including an upset class win at the Nurburgring. Flush with confidence, Frank and Paula quickly moved on to bigger and better things. The Apollo GT was Intermeccanica’s first proper complete road car, powered by 3.5L or 4.9L Buick V8 engines fitted into a hand-built Italian body. After the Apollo came the Italia, a car that, through several twists and turns of failed business partnerships became Intermeccanica’s most successful model. Following the failure of two partnerships (with Jack Griffith and Steve Wilder) in the attempt to get the project off the ground, Intermeccanica realized the only way to succeed with the new car, now called Italia, was to build it in-house. The car featured a chassis designed by ex-BRM designer John Crosthwaite, wrapped in a svelte steel body designed by Robert Cumberford, and tweaked by the legendary Bertone man Franco Scaglione, lending serious credibility to Intermeccanica. A deal was eventually struck with Ford Motor Company to supply engines, transmissions, rear axles and Magnum 500 wheels from the Mustang. As the Mustang evolved, so did the Italia: The 289 V8 led to the 302, and finally to the big 351C. Components were shipped to Turin, Italy and installed in tubular chassis and bodies built in-house at Intermeccanica. Today, these cars remain very collectible thanks to their proper Italian sports car style, reliable and powerful American drivetrain and very good build quality. These are proper, hand crafted and thoroughly engineered cars, not to be confused with a kit car or homebuilt special. This 1972 Intermeccanica Italia Spyder is from the final year of production before the Opel-based Indra took the Italia’s place. It is a highly original example finished in silver over black with a black convertible top. A pretty and very correct car, it was recently shown at the Greenwich Concours d’Elegance in Connecticut and has been shown and driven a great deal by its previous owners. The steel body is in very good order, with good, factory-appropriate panel fit and crisp body lines. Silver paint gives it an understated look, which is in attractive condition with deep gloss and only a few minor flaws that have come from regular enjoyment. The headlight “sugar scoops” are blacked out for an aggressive look and the car rides on a set of Cromadora Dino-style alloy wheels in place of the typical Magnum 500s. Chrome bumpers as well as lights and trim are all in very good order. The interior is excellent, trimmed in original black upholstery on the seats and door cards. Black carpets are in fine condition and the black soft top fits taut and snug. The center console houses switches for the electric windows, a typically ornate Italian ash tray (for smoking in style, we assume) and controls for the HVAC. The dash is typical early 1970s Italian – austere, wrapped in black leather and with an aviation-like purposefulness to the layout. The original radio and instruments are in place and in excellent order. Under the hood is Ford’s proven, reliable and incredibly stout 351-Cleveland V8, lending the Italia a serious turn of speed. The presentation under the hood is very respectable, the prior owners having resisted the urge to modify the car with modern speed parts. Ford blue paint on the engine, as well as the satin black engine bay is all in very tidy condition. Even the original Italian under-hood insulation remains intact and in excellent condition. The engine is backed by a four-speed manual Top Loader transmission, which is built to handle the torque of the big 351C. This Italia is a very attractive example that is ripe for enjoyment on the road, yet has been maintained in a show-worthy condition. Included in the sale is a copy of the original bill of sale, as well as the original owner’s manual. The Italia was one of the best of the Italian-American hybrids, a finely built car produced by a passionate enthusiast for the pure love of Italian machinery.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1936 Packard Super 8 Coupe Roadster

    $139,500(£108,377.55)

    In many ways, Packard’s 14th series marked a significant turning point for the company. Introduced in 1936 to replace the 12th series (there was no 13th series for superstitious reasons), the model itself was very much evolutionary. But it marked the end of the line for many signature Packard features such as the 17” wire wheels, ride control shocks, Bijur chassis lubrication and most notably, it was the final year for the legendary 385 cubic inch straight eight engine before the 320 cubic inch unit replaced it. As before, three distinct model lines were available; the Eight, Super Eight and Twelve. All were available in a tremendous variety of body styles and configurations. The Super Eight was the top eight cylinder model and it shared some key features and options from the Twelve, such as the special fluid-filled counter-weight bumpers that smoothed the ride on rough roads. Streamlining was beginning to take hold in American design language, and the styling for the 14th series was tweaked with the radiator tilted back a further 5 degrees, and full, curvaceous fenders wearing bullet headlamps. Just a few short years later, the headlamps would be enveloped within the fenders and the classic era of Packard styling would come to a close. 1936 models remain very collectible for their “last of the line” appeal and beautiful classic-era style. This 1936 Packard Super Eight Coupe Roadster (model 1404, body style 959) is a rare example from the fourteenth series. Fewer than 1,500 Super Eights were built in 1936, and they remain very desirable among Packard enthusiasts. This is a complete and inherently sound example that shows lots of history with the noted Packard experts Hill & Vaughan from the early 1990s. The cosmetic condition is somewhat tired, with thin and checked paint over average-to-good quality panels. The body however, is generally sound and panel fit is good, and it doesn’t show signs of severe corrosion or physical damage. Chrome trim is complete and intact, with the optional counterweighted Twelve bumpers and fully plated grill shell appearing quite straight, however the plating is heavily corroded and peeling or pitted in most areas. Dual sidemount spare tires are topped with chrome covers and Packard mirrors, in similar condition. The dual bullet tail lights are in good condition, and some of the minor chrome trim is still serviceable. It wears several original accessories such as a Cormorant mascot, dual spot lights, and a pair of Trippe Light driving lamps, running board lamps, Super Eight luggage rack and the aforementioned weighted bumpers. The car rides on painted wire wheels which appear in fair condition, wearing good quality wide-whitewall tires. The underbody shows some surface corrosion and plenty of signs of use, though as with the body, the chassis appears generally sound. Inside, the mocha brown leather upholstery is in good condition, showing some use but in rather good order with correct patterns and nice quality fit. A woodgrain painted dash is quite attractive, as are the original instruments and switchgear. This car is equipped with an optional radio as well as a lovely woodgrain pattern steering wheel. The door caps are wood veneer, and while they look generally good, the finish is peeling in areas. Overall, the interior is very much serviceable as-is and rather attractive and functional despite its age. Rumble seat upholstery is also quite good, appearing to have seen little use or sun exposure over the years. The convertible top is trimmed in tan canvas and appears in very good condition, showing no rips, tears or excessive wear. In mechanical terms, this Packard Super Eight is in good order. It runs and drives well, and with minimal effort could be turned into a usable, albeit heavily patinated example. Extensive History at Hill & Vaughn shows the car was very well cared-for in mechanical terms, receiving an engine overhaul in 1993 as well as numerous other mechanical service items. Today, the engine appears in good condition; the legendary 385 cubic inch inline eight presenting in sound order. While this Packard Super Eight certainly has its needs, it can still very much be used and enjoyed as-is with little fettling. Alternately, given the mechanical upkeep it has received over the years and the generally sound foundation, it would make for a very approachable restoration. Regardless of your direction, this is a fine opportunity to acquire a rare, genuine, CCCA-approved Full Classic Packard 1404 Super Eight at a reasonable cost of entry.

    Last update: 29 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1964 Jaguar MK II Sedan

    $79,500(£61,763.55)

    Jaguar has a long tradition of building luxurious saloon cars. From the days of S.S. Cars through today, Jaguar’s luxurious yet sporting saloons have sustained the company. In the mid-1950s, Jaguar was riding high with the success of the XK road cars and world-beating C-Type sports racer. The big MkVII and MkIX were surprisingly successful in British Saloon Car racing at the hands of Sir Stirling Moss and others, but these were huge cars and Jaguar wanted to appeal to a broader audience. In a move to boost sales and help their chances on track, Jaguar introduced the mid-size 2.4 and 3.4 saloons. The new mid-sized car debuted in 1955, built on Jaguar’s first fully monocoque chassis. The curvaceous body was heavily influenced by the XK sports cars as was the same twin-cam engine which was mated to a choice of manual or automatic transmissions. Further refinements to the shape and mechanical spec brought the MkII of 1959 which featured a larger greenhouse, and a myriad of mechanical improvements including the addition of the hot 3.8 liter engine from the E-Type, which, according to legend was the choice motor for getaway drivers and the police alike. The MkII and its derivatives (such as the fully independent 3.8 S-Type) remained in production until 1969 when the XJ6 was ushered in to consolidate all of Jaguar’s saloon models into one line. In 1999, Ford Motor Company had formed the new Premier Automotive Group in order to capture higher end buyers and expand their global market reach. The new group included Aston Martin, Volvo, Jaguar and from 2000, Land Rover. Particularly in the case of Aston and Jaguar, Ford executives pumped millions in resources into the two struggling firms and in the process managed to successfully turn around their fortunes. Cars such as the XK8 and the DB7 were born of Ford’s management. Of course, there were critics who lamented the shared platforms and some parts-bin engineering, but all told, it was Ford’s influence that saved these two iconic British companies. Presumably to celebrate his new acquisitions, Ford CEO Jacques Nasser sought the finest examples each of a Jaguar XK150, MkII and Series III E-type for his collection. In his quest, he purchased this stunning 1964 MkII saloon, in 3.4 liter, right-hand drive, manual gearbox specification. The car, #167128, has a very well-known history back to new when it was purchased in the UK by Worth Engineering managing director George Nelson Trotter Pattison. Mr. Pattison used the MkII as his company car for several years, and photos exist showing the car in period at Mr. Pattison’s home. It then passed to David Collier of Surrey in 1967, who enjoyed the car thoroughly for several more years. When purchased by Mr. Nasser some 30 years later, the MkII had already been comprehensively restored by Southern Classics in England. The car was subsequently sorted and prepped for concours duty by Jack Roush Engineering, the famous race shop with deep ties to Ford Motor Company. Roush freshened the car with subtly updated suspension, rebuilt the transmission and overdrive, rebuilt and tuned the carburetors and discreetly added a power rack and pinion steering setup from a later XJ. No expense was spared, and even at a discounted shop rate (Nasser was the CEO, after all) nearly $90,000 was spent ensuring the car was both road and concours ready. Today, the MkII remains in beautiful condition, looking resplendent in its original colors of Opalescent Golden Sand over red hides. It retains original tools, V5 registration documentation, and an extensive history file. The quality of the restoration is outstanding and it has held up very well, remaining crisp and straight, with concours quality paintwork and fully restored chrome. Along with the power steering, the car was also updated to ride on chrome knock-off wire wheels, shod with blackwall radial tires. It is a beautifully detailed example and the color and quality are simply beautiful. This MkII certainly makes a dramatic statement. The interior of the MkII is the epitome of mid-century British luxury. Leather, walnut and wool carpets dominate the cabin. The red Connolly hides remain in excellent condition, showing very little wear despite the years since the restoration was completed. Red Wilton carpets are excellent as is the correct broadcloth headlining. The extensive wood work has all been beautifully restored, adorning the dash, door caps, and rear picnic trays. Chrome fittings and switchgear have all been restored to the same high level, as have the instruments and period correct radio. The cabin of this MkII is lovely, inviting and a great place to spend an afternoon of motoring. Speaking of motoring, the 3.4 liter XK inline six is strong running and well sorted. While it gives up a few cubic centimeters of displacement over its larger sibling, this engine is no doubt a powerful, sweet and revvy unit that rewards with a beautiful soundtrack – particularly breathing through this car’s stainless steel exhaust. The manual transmission is the most highly sought after by enthusiasts, and this example’s original overdrive unit allows for effortless cruising once the road straightens out. The XK unit is also one of the best looking engines of all time. Lifting the hood reveals lots of beautifully polished alloy on the cam covers, intake manifolds and S.U. carburetor bodies. The engine and head are finished in the correct colors, and the rest of the engine bay is detailed with proper decals, labels and fittings. Presentation is excellent, demonstrating the level of care this special car has received since its restoration. Jaguar is often credited with inventing and perfecting the “sports saloon” concept with its MkI and MkII derivatives, and just a few minutes behind the wheel of this marvelous MkII is enough to see why. This car’s exceptional no-expense-spared maintenance history is felt from the first turn of the wheel. It is a fine example with excellent presentation and an outstanding history that includes ownership by the boss of Jaguar cars. It is ready to be fully enjoyed and will undoubtedly reward with plenty of entertaining miles.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1985 Aston Martin Lagonda Saloon

    $72,500(£56,325.25)

    Aston Martin shocked the world in 1976 when they unveiled the sensational Lagonda Saloon at the London Motor Show. The spectacularly futuristic, Avant Garde styling was penned (with a straightedge, we imagine) by the great designer William Towns. The chassis was unique to the new car, utilizing the existing Tadek Marek-designed 5.3 liter V8 engine, which was backed by a Chrysler-sourced Torque-Flite automatic transmission. Looking back at other luxury saloons of 1976, it is particularly amazing that Aston took such a gamble with the styling, and even more so that it paid off. Not only did Aston Martin push the envelope in terms of style, they also pushed the boundaries of technology with a highly ambitious LED instrument panel with gas-plasma touch screen controls. The system seemed straight out of science fiction, and despite being beautiful to look at, proved to be horrifically unreliable. By 1980, Aston abandoned the troublesome touch screen controls, but retained the LED gauges. The price had doubled to nearly 50,000 GBP, yet it still sold well enough to keep the company afloat. Production trickled on, sometimes just few cars per year leaving the Newport Pagnell works. In 1985, a revised version was introduced, effectively known as the series 3. The incredible dash now featured Cathode Ray Tube instruments that projected information to the driver like miniaturized television screens. It was moderately more reliable than the LED system, yet still visually appealing. On the mechanical side, the proven V8 put out 305 horsepower and 288 ft. lbs of torque, enough to propel the big Aston to 150 mph, square into supercar territory. Production and refinements continued, until production ceased at the end of 1990. Aston Martin built a total of just 645 Lagondas between 1978 and 1990, and very few examples remain. This 1985 Lagonda saloon has covered just 46,599 miles from new and has been maintained to a standard far and above what is typical for these cars. This example was specially ordered in Jaguar Cranberry metallic over light gray hides and Wilton wool carpets, with a red dash, red wheel and red Mouton overmats. A copy of the original invoice shows the car cost a staggering $150,000 in 1985! It has been exceptionally well cared-for and today, the body presents in very good condition, with well-preserved original paint over straight panels that exhibit good fit and consistent gaps. A few minor stone chips can be found, though nothing beyond what should be expected from a cherished example with this mileage. Exterior trim is in excellent condition, with the black plastic bumpers and aprons in very good order as well. It rides on its correct BBS-supplied disc alloy wheels wearing correct profile Michelin MXV tires. It is a very attractive example that has clearly been cherished from new, benefiting from an astounding $70,000 in service and repairs since 2013. Inside, the Connolly hides are in excellent order, with a very good leather dash and console, free of shrinking and cracks. The headlining remains in good condition with just some minor wear visible on the A-pillar trims. Fresh mouton overmats have been recently fitted and the carpets present in good condition. Critically, the dash was recently fully disassembled and the cathode ray tube screens for the instruments were sent to a specialist in the U.K. for a comprehensive refurbishment. The wood trim is in good condition, exhibiting a few cracks in the lacquer but otherwise intact and attractive. Original books as well as the briefcase style tool kit are in place. Mechanically, the big Lagonda is in excellent condition. The engine bay is clean and orderly, showing signs of regular care and use. The meticulous servicing it has received in the hands of the last owner shines through in a car that runs strongly and performs as one would expect from a brutish 80’s Aston Martin. The undercarriage is tidy with original finishes and what appears to be factory undercoat and an excellent exhaust system. This is a very well maintained Lagonda that has benefited from specialized care, with common problem areas sorted to ensure the next keeper enjoys the car to the fullest. Wearing attractive colors, with sound cosmetics and functional signature features, this is an unmistakable 80’s supercar that is likely one of the best examples of its type available.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1962 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud II LWB

    $69,500(£53,994.55)

    The Silver Cloud series marked a significant step for Rolls Royce when it was introduced in April of 1955. Rolls Royce was rationalizing their production line as the days of supplying bare chassis to coachbuilders were winding down and standard showroom models were becoming ever more popular. The standardization of production allowed Rolls Royce to produce cars in greater numbers than ever before, though critically, while still maintaining the same level of quality and engineering excellence that was expected of them. The Silver Cloud was their first “mass produced” major commercial success and in the 60 years since its introduction, has become an icon of luxury motoring. Initially the Silver Cloud was fitted with a traditional iron block inline six-cylinder engine. But even before the Silver Cloud reached production, Rolls Royce engineers were hard at work designing an engine that would carry them through the next decade, and beyond. After several proposals such as a V12 and even an inline eight, engineers settled on a V8 layout that would be compact enough yet provide superior output to the current six-cylinder. This was a thoroughly advanced engine that was cast in alloy with wet liners, and wore the carburetors in the center of the “vee” to keep the dimensions as compact as possible. Development of this 6.2 liter unit wasn’t completed until after Silver Cloud production was well underway, but in 1959 it was introduced in that car which became known as the Silver Cloud II. The Silver Cloud II was visually very similar to the outgoing Cloud I, with only very minor cosmetic changes taking place. The big changes lay under the bodywork where the V8 was carefully wedged into place and several enhancements made to the chassis to improve handling, ride, and the ability to cope with the additional power. Once optional equipment, power steering became standard fitment. As before, both standard and long wheelbase chassis were offered and of the 2,717 Silver Cloud II’s built, just 299 were in long-wheelbase specification, making these particularly rare and desirable among today’s Rolls Royce enthusiasts. This handsome 1962 Silver Cloud II (S/N LLCA49) is a very rare left-hand-drive, long-wheelbase example that was delivered new to Switzerland.  The previous owner was a long time caretaker having purchased the car in 1985. It appears never to have been fully restored, but rather has been very well maintained, with only light cosmetic restoration work performed on an as-needed basis. It is finished in attractive sand over sable with a Biscuit Tan Connolly leather interior and fitted with desirable Frigette Air Conditioning, power windows, and an AM radio, all of which is documented on the original build sheets, copies of which accompany the car. The paint work shows is very attractive, laid down on coachwork that is straight and solid, while the often-tricky panel gaps are tidy and consistent. Chrome and brightwork are of very good quality, showing some care-wear but otherwise quite attractive, straight and complete, in good keeping with the rest of the cosmetics. Of course, the best place to enjoy a Silver Cloud is from within the sumptuous interior. This example does not disappoint with very clean and well-appointed cabin. Leather seating is in excellent condition and the walnut woodwork is in very good order, having been refinished, but not completely restored. Air conditioning is reserved for the rear seat occupants, who also have individual book-matched walnut tray tables. Mechanically, this example appears to have been well-maintained and performs admirably. The 6.2 Liter V8 is known for its amazing longevity and this unit still runs quiet and strong, mated to the factory original four-speed automatic transmission. The car recently had a full service including all new brakes, air conditioning service, carburetor rebuilds, and new tires. The Silver Cloud remains one of the most recognizable icons of the automobile. In this, the second series, it combines that timeless elegance with effortless performance and exceptional rarity. .

    Last update: 28 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1961 Alvis TD21 Coupe

    $49,500(£38,456.55)

    Started in 1917, Alvis began automobile production in 1920 and continued into the early days of World War II, resuming production in 1946. The first postwar Alvis had an overhead valve, 2993 cc inline six-cylinder engine, independent front suspension (something Alvis had pioneered in the early 1930s along with a fully synchronized 4-speed gearbox) and hydraulic brakes. By 1958, the series had developed into the TD21. An evolution of the TC108G, it had bodywork based on a design by Graber in Switzerland but made by Park Ward in England, 115 brake horsepower from the straight-six, a four-speed gearbox borrowed from Austin-Healey, a front anti roll bar and front disc brakes. Suspension, like previous Alvises, was independent at the front with coil springs and a live rear axle with leaf springs. A particularly elegant, luxurious and expensive car, the Alvis was and still is a fine alternative to the Jaguars, Daimlers, Rolls-Royces and Bentleys that are so popular with enthusiasts. With just over 1,000 built, they are quite rare as well. This 1961 Alvis TD21 is a very pretty example finished in medium blue with a beige leather interior. It has chrome wire wheels, blackwall radial tires, a beautiful walnut dashboard and period correct AM radio. It spent some years in California after being brought to the US in 1976, and wears a 2000 restoration that included a repaint, chrome work and carpets. Included are receipts and service records that date back to 1972. Overall, it is a highly presentable automobile that is also mechanically sound and runs and drives very well. A sorted, pretty and rare Alvis, it is a fantastic car for long, pleasurable drives and to just have fun with.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1928 Packard 443 Murphy Convertible Sedan

    $225,000(£174,802.50)

    The summer of 1927 saw Packard introduce its newest model, known officially as the Fourth Series, or the 4-43. Based on a 143” wheelbase and powered by the same proven 385 cubic inch inline eight-cylinder engine as the 1926 models, this new car represented a typically evolutionary step forward for Packard. The legendary straight eight featured nine main bearings, L-head valve arrangement and produced 109 horsepower, delivered with sublime smoothness. The engineers at Packard always strove for excellence in reliability, drivability and quality, and they earned the company’s status as producers of some of the finest American cars of the era. As usual with high end pre-war manufacturers, Packard had the freedom to choose from an array of standard catalog bodies, or they could select a custom body built by any number of favored coachbuilders of the era. One of the most prestigious of those American coachbuilders was Walter M. Murphy Coachbuilders of Pasadena, California. Originally from Detroit, Walter M. Murphy was practically born to be in the automobile business. His uncle, William H. Murphy, had bankrolled Henry Ford in 1899 and later worked closely with Henry Leland of Cadillac and Lincoln fame. Young Walter moved to California in 1904, and opened his first dealership in Los Angeles in 1916, representing Simplex and Locomobile. Success came quickly and by 1920, he operated the premier West Coast Lincoln distributorship. At the same time, he recognized the demand for top quality coachwork was not being met, especially to the tastes of his California clientele, so he hired the best talent he could and established Walter M. Murphy Co. coachbuilding. Word spread of Murphy’s quality and exquisite style, particularly among Hollywood elite and the California business world. Their bodies would go on to grace a great number of special European chassis from the likes of Mercedes Benz, Minerva, and Bentley. Murphy also holds the distinction of providing more bodies for Duesenberg J and SJ chassis than any other coachbuilder – nearly a quarter of total production. The intersection of Murphy and Packard was a natural one, as both companies demanded excellence in their products. However, given the more conservative nature of Packard buyers, very few of them opted for Murphy coachwork, making them exceptionally rare finds today. This striking example is one such Packard to originally wear a Murphy body, in this case, a gorgeous “Clear Vision” convertible sedan. While the earliest history of this particular car is yet unknown, it was purchased by its most recent owner some 40 years ago as a restoration project. As so often happens, life and business took precedent over the Packard, but the owner held on to the car, knowing he had something special on his hands. Finally, within the last 10 years, the owner was able to treat the car to a much-deserved, no-expense-spared, body-off restoration undertaken by Vintage Motorcars of Westbrook, Connecticut. This Packard 4-43 Custom Eight is now presented in a wonderful combination of two-tone red, featuring a bright red main body and subtle, darker red fenders, chassis and body feature lines. A dark red canvas top and two-tone disc wheels complete the look, in a subtle, yet visually imposing manner highlighting the masterful Murphy styling. The restoration is excellent, with superb paint and finish quality. Chrome drum-style Tilt Ray headlamps flank the chrome Packard radiator grille, which is topped with a Packard Moto Meter in combination with a Goddess of Speed mascot. The rear features an upholstered, fitted trunk as well as a trunk rack to handle any additional luggage. Dual side mount spares and painted disc wheels have been fitted with fresh black-wall tires that lend this car a marvelous, aggressive look. The bumpers are accented with red-painted brackets, further enhancing the sporting appearance of the Murphy bodywork. The lavish interior is trimmed in gorgeous and supple tobacco-colored antiqued leather. The quality and execution are outstanding, with the deep brown colors wonderfully judged against the rich red of the body and canvas top. Door panels are trimmed in the same subtle antiqued leather as the seats, with intricate stitching and beautiful detail. Like the seats, the brown carpets are expertly fitted, lining the front and rear compartments as well as the lower edges of the door cards. We particularly like the details such as leather covered sills with Murphy badges grace all four doors. The marvelous interior not only looks fabulous, but when viewed in person, the colors, materials and quality can be truly appreciated. As a convertible sedan, this Packard features a fully opening soft top, with the all-weather comfort afforded by roll up windows that seal tight against the top frame. The dash is equipped with original instruments and is finished to original specification with a beautiful wood grain finish. A stylish finish touch is the marbleized shift knob topping the gear lever. Packard’s turbine-like 385 cubic inch inline-eight is presented in excellent condition, detailed to a high standard in correct Packard green with black porcelain manifolds. A set of period Champion spark plugs demonstrate the level of detail achieved in the restoration. Since the project was completed, this stunning 4-43 Custom Eight has been minimally shown and is eligible for any number of AACA, CCCA or similar events. Show quality finishing, excellent road manners and stunning Murphy coachwork combine to make this one seriously rare and highly desirable Packard.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1946 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible

    $99,500(£77,301.55)

    The end of World War II signaled a dramatic shift in the American auto industry. Car production had halted suddenly in 1942 as factories were retooled for the war effort. Now that the conflict was over, auto production could resume, but the problem was that design and development of new models had all but halted during the war as well. So most manufacturers had to make do with hastily refreshed versions of their existing pre-war models. In the case of Cadillac, that meant resuming the brilliant Series 62. The front end design was subtly reworked with a new grille and fender profile with beautiful effect. The proud grille and beautifully contoured body would serve as the basis for Cadillac’s design language through the rest of the 1940s and into the early 50s. The car was available in a number of body styles and trim packages, with the Fleetwood 60 Special topping the sedan range, and the Series 62 Convertible the ultimate of the two-door models. Cadillac still considered itself “The Standard of the World” in this era, and the cars were lavishly equipped with automatic transmissions, V8 engines, leather upholstery, power accessories and so forth. The model proved very popular with buyers, remaining essentially unchanged through 1947, with nearly 40,000 units of the Series 62 sold. This beautiful 1946 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible is a CCCA Premier and 2009 AACA National 1st Prize winning example, carefully restored to an extremely high standard in 2007 and beautifully maintained since. The Fisher built body is finished in its original and attractive shade of Madiera Maroon, which coincides with the code number 9 on the trim tag. The paint quality is very good, laid down on straight panels with very good alignment. The doors shut with a satisfyingly solid feel that is the unmistakable mark of Cadillac quality. Hailing from the early days of the chrome era in American design, this Series 62 wears its extensive brightwork well. The large chrome grille, chrome bumpers and polished stainless body trim are in excellent order, straight and free of dings, pitting or blemishes. Among the optional extras is a pair of factory reversing lamps. Body color steel wheels are fitted with chrome beauty rings and chrome Cadillac center caps as original. Combined with wide whitewall tires, the look is striking and elegant. Opening the substantial door reveals a cleverly integrated running board where the fender sweeps into the door. The interior, designed by Fleetwood, is elegant and beautifully detailed, trimmed in supple red leather to a very high standard. Door and quarter panels are equally beautiful, trimmed in correct original patterns. This car was delivered very well-equipped from the factory, with power windows, a power front seat and power operated tan canvas top. Other features include an original radio, heater/defroster (an option for 1946), anti-glare mirror, windscreen washer and Hydramatic transmission. As with the exterior, the interior trim and brightwork have been very well maintained since the restoration and present in excellent condition. The leather seats show only the slightest creasing from use, appearing quite fresh yet inviting. The rear seat appears to have barely been used and remains excellent. Maroon carpeting is executed in the correct material and patterns. These early post-war Cadillacs are marvelous cars to drive, and the lush interior of this example only enhances the experience. In 1946, Cadillac was still three years away from unveiling its revolutionary OHV V8 engine. So beneath the hood lays venerable and proven flathead “monoblock” V8 displacing 346 cubic inches (“monoblock”, referring to the fact that the cylinder block and crankcase were now one casting). Particularly when mated with the four-speed Hydramatic automatic transmission, these Cadillacs were capable of near 100mph performance with the exceptional smoothness that is the signature of a flathead engine. On this example, the engine is well detailed, finished in correct Cadillac green with black porcelain manifolds and correct gloss black accessories. An optional windscreen washer jar is affixed to the firewall and the presentation is very good, with correct hoses and clamps, lacquered ignition wires, and correct braided wiring loom. The engine show some signs of regular running, though it also appears to have been well maintained in the process. The undercarriage and trunk are likewise well detailed and tidy, with original jack, tools and spare wheel in place. A top boot is included to ensure a lovely finished look when the top is down. The comprehensive restoration by Art Voss was extensively documented, with photo albums included in the sale. The Series 62 is the last Cadillac model to be approved as a CCCA full classic (through 1947), and is a popular choice for touring thanks to its excellent performance and road manners. This car’s quality presentation as well as its proven show and tour record make it the ideal candidate for a collector who wishes to truly enjoy one of the finest American cars of the era as it was originally intended – for top down cruising in impeccable style.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1924 Locomobile Model 48 Open Drive Limousine

    $119,500(£92,839.55)

    During Locomobile’s brief, 33 year history, the company produced some of the finest cars motorcars available in America. Holding true to their slogan, “The Best Built Car in America” their hand-crafted, limited production motorcars appealed to a conservative and extremely wealthy clientele. The introduction of the Model 48 in 1911 proved very significant as it went on to become the company’s most successful model, surviving through the end of 1925. After the Model 48 had been officially discontinued, the Model 90 still shared much of the same architecture pioneered by the Model 48. Based on a conventional but exquisitely constructed chassis, the Model 48 was powered by a big 525 cubic inch side-valve inline six-cylinder. It was rated at 48 taxable horsepower, with actual output topping 100hp by the 1920s. Many of the powertrain components were cast in an expensive bronze alloy, and the engines proved extremely robust. Owning a Locomobile was reserved for only the wealthiest of individual, with many of the most important names of the day on the roster of owners; Carnegie, Vanderbilt and Wrigley were all chauffeured in their magnificent Locomobiles. Put into perspective, our handsome subject car, a 1924 Model M-48, cost $9,500 when new. Compare that to a Ford Model T of the same year at just $265. One could have a veritable fleet of Model Ts for the cost of entry into the exclusive world of Locomobile ownership. This fascinating Locomobile M-48 wears an elegant and formal Open Drive Limousine body designed by J. Frank de Causee for the Bridgeport Body Company. Most bodies, including this one, were built just down the road from the works at this highly regarded shop, though Locomobile did contract with a number of outside coachbuilders through the years but forbade contractors from applying their own coachbuilder tags. An imposing and grand machine, this Model 48 wears a high quality older restoration and has been enjoyed by the previous owners on a great many AACA tours. It presents in very good condition throughout, having remained under the care of one owner from 1963 to 2008, and showing just 25,560 miles which is believed to be accurate. The restoration was sympathetically executed, and has been well-maintained since with very good dark blue paintwork on the main body, black fenders and subtle gold coach lines. The theme repeats on the wood spoked wheels which wear period appropriate black tires. A pair of spare tires are fitted to the rear, as to not impede ingress and egress to the cabin, in the process helping the car to look even longer than its 142” wheelbase already suggests. Fine quality polished nickel plating adorns the radiator, headlamps, and other details. The doors shut with impressive precision and exhibit excellent fit, indicative of the beautifully crafted coachwork as well as the impressive restoration. The driver’s compartment is largely open, excepting the fixed roof panel. As expected with a chauffeur-driven limousine, the front is trimmed in hard-wearing black leather. The black button-style leather is very good, showing little wear in spite of the regular use this car has seen. The speedometer, incorporating a clock and odometer, is by Waltham while secondary instruments are by Westinghouse. A Locomobile patent tag is attached to the dash, showing this as car number 19124. Sills are stamped with body number 3393. Black leather door cards and kick panels are in good condition. The driver’s compartment presents as it should, businesslike and functional, and in excellent condition. Rear passengers are protected by the elements in a fully enclosed compartment with roll up side glass and an interesting three-pane divider window. The compartment is trimmed in blue fabric and blue carpeting to complement the body. The large rear seat has room for at least three passengers, while a pair of jump seats stow in the floor. The cabin is opulently equipped with a pair of bud vases, grab handles, silk blinds, dual dome lamps, robe rail, and a rear Waltham clock. Passengers are also treated to dual running board lamps and a speaking tube for with which to bark orders at the chauffeur. The huge six-cylinder engine produces a mighty 107 horsepower and a prodigious wave of torque. Locomobiles were renowned for their smooth, silent operation as well as outright power and this example is no exception. The engine is very well presented with finishes and detailing up to a very good standard, showing the car has been enjoyed but very well maintained. It remains in sound order, running well with sound mechanicals. It was awarded an AACA National First Prize in 1966, and has been exceptionally well preserved since, a testament to both the quality of the restoration as well as the quality of the Model 48. Few early American cars are as evocative or imposing as Locomobile. Belying the years since its restoration, this grand and important motorcar presents in wonderful condition, still very much showable, yet also an excellent choice for CCCA or AACA touring.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1991 Toyota Century Sedan

    $24,500(£19,034.05)

    The Toyota Century made its first appearance way back in 1967 to celebrate the centennial of the company’s founder, Sakichi Toyoda. As a fitting tribute, designers envisioned a car that would satisfy the ideals of Japanese luxury, with no compromises from outside cultures. Conceived as a Japanese equivalent to a Rolls-Royce, the Century was a hand-built limousine intended for business leaders and high-ranking dignitaries. The body style remained essentially unchanged from 1967 through 1997, with only some minor styling tweaks and mechanical refinements along the way. Powered by Toyota’s own light alloy V8 engine, displacement grew from 2.6 liters to 4.0 liters by the end of the original series. These cars were the epitome of Japanese luxury. By the last-run G40 series, equipment included luxurious cloth upholstery, power adjustable rear seats, electric door latches, automatic climate control (introduced in 1971!) separate controls for front/rear ventilation and a host of other luxury and technological features. The final evolution of the V8 series came in 1987 with the introduction of a 4.0 liter engine, four-speed automatic transmission and updated electronics and climate control. As always, each Century was hand-built to order by highly trained craftsmen. The cars were not actually built by Toyota; such was the highly specialized nature of the project that they contracted with Kanto Auto Works (today a subsidiary of Toyota), a specialized body builder to handle production. There is no doubt Toyota was targeting Rolls-Royce buyers, as the shape of the Century has some very Crewe-like styling cues, particularly in the detail of the C-pillars. The Toyota Century is a beautifully crafted machine, built with exquisite precision that conjures thoughts of both traditional English coachbuilding as well as Japanese engineering excellence. It is important not to confuse the hand-built Century as being a home-market Lexus, it is in fact a completely separate and bespoke line. With increased attention in the collector market for Japanese cars, this is a wonderful opportunity to acquire a rare and exceptionally engineered machine that you’re unlikely to encounter anywhere else. This 1991 Century is an exquisitely presented example and one of only a mere handful of its kind in the United States. It is an exceptionally clean example showing just 21,000 KM from new. The dark blue paintwork is elegant and very well suited to the handsome body lines. The body is very straight and the doors open and shut with a satisfying solidity that only the likes of Mercedes and Rolls-Royce can claim. Chrome bumpers are straight and tidy with excellent plating and free of dents, dings or scuffs. Many of these cars were chauffeur driven, and as such, exceptionally well maintained and cared for. Wing mirrors are a signature of the Japanese market, and thankfully these are power adjustable and surprisingly effective. The car rides on a set of steel wheels with Yokohama tires with distinct turbine-style wheel covers. The overall look is of subdued elegance, a long, low and imposing sedan that embodies quality. The opulent cabin is trimmed in high quality patterned fabrics. For the Century and the extended wheelbase Century limousine, fabric was preferred for its superior comfort in all conditions, as well as the ability to dampen sounds and keep cabin noise levels to a minimum. In addition, it remained silent during passenger ingress and egress. The seats, which are in excellent condition, are adorned with custom fitted crochet lace covers, a tradition in Japanese car culture particularly in the highly professional Tokyo Taxis as well as in most private limousines. Carpets and the remaining soft trim are all excellent, showing very little use and made with high-quality materials. A mixture of English and Japanese labeled switchgear controls the countless functions and systems on the Century. It features cabin adjustable suspension, sport and comfort modes on the transmission, fully automatic climate control and power seats front and rear. One of our favorite discoveries was to find the air conditioning vents in the dash automatically oscillate to circulate the air evenly. Toyota’s 4.0 liter V8 engine (known as the 5V-EU) is unique to the Crown Century line, and in this late specification produces 165 horsepower and 215 ft/lbs of torque. It may not be a powerhouse, but it operates in near silence, wafting the big Century along effortlessly. We found it to be smooth, exceptionally quiet and quite enjoyable to drive. The Century offers an altogether different kind of luxury than the leather-swathed techno-marvels from Germany; it is an experience that melds traditional, old school ideals of understated luxury with the high levels of technology and precise engineering that are simultaneously embraced in Japanese culture. This lovely Toyota Century has clearly led a charmed life, perhaps shuttling dignitaries or powerful executives around Tokyo in its distinctly traditional manner. It is a beautifully presented example that will surely start conversations wherever it appears, providing an enjoyable and unique motoring experience along the way.

    Last update: 29 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1979 Mercedes-Benz 450SLC Coupe

    $52,500(£40,787.25)

    Following up on the commercial success of the R113-series 230, 250 and 280SL, Mercedes-Benz unveiled the all-new and thoroughly modern R107-series in 1971. The 107 continued along the path forged by the R113 that set the foundation of the SL-class as we know it today. The R113 was the car that took the engineering excellence of the original 300SL and combined it with the broader market appeal of the junior 190SL, in a package that was sporty, civilized and exceptionally well-rounded. The SL was now a sports car for those who preferred to arrive in style yet remain completely unruffled, an ethos that remains in the DNA of today’s SL roadsters. Introduced in late 1971, the R107 further refined the theme set forth by the R113, albeit on an all-new platform that was larger, more rigid, and wrapped in finely detailed styling. It was also the first new model to benefit fully from Mercedes’ obsession with safety that began in the late 1960s. From its introduction, it was designed to carry both six-cylinder and a new line V8 engines. Suspension was fully independent all around, backed by four wheel disc brakes and a robust unibody chassis. Alongside the traditional roadster with its optional removable hard top, Mercedes-Benz also unveiled a full four seat version with a fixed roof and extended wheelbase. This new model, dubbed “SLC” replaced the ageing W111-based 280SE and marked the first time their flagship four-seat coupe was based not on a sedan platform, but the sporting SL platform. The SLC shared the same suspension, braking and powertrain components as its open-topped sibling, but benefitted from an exceptionally rigid platform with the fixed roof. Combined with the longer wheelbase, and the larger 4.5 liter version of the alloy V8, the SLC delivered robust performance and exceptional ride quality. Typical for a Mercedes-Benz SL-class car, the SLC was tuned for high-speed touring rather than outright corner-carving ability. But in spite of its grand touring pretenses and soft-sprung nature, the SLC was quite a capable sporting car – with predictable handling, excellent grip and powerful brakes. In fact, the SLC became a rather successful (albeit unlikely) rally competitor through the 1970s and into the 1980s. The 107 platform was such a success that it became the longest running passenger car model in Mercedes history (only being outlasted by the G-Wagen off-roader) and has become a favorite among collectors and enthusiasts the world over, thanks to its exceptional longevity, timeless style and tank-like build quality. This 1979 Mercedes-Benz 450SLC is a beautiful, unrestored example showing a genuine 31,354 miles from new. It is finished in its original shade of Gray-Blau metallic (code 906G) over a blue interior and presents in stunning condition inside and out. It is a well-optioned model with factory fitted sunroof, power locks and windows, automatic climate control, Tempomat cruise control and alloy wheels. The body is exceptionally straight, with all original belt moldings, rocker moldings and bumpers in excellent order. Chrome and anodized brightwork is outstanding, with no dings, dents or corrosion to speak of. The SLC’s signature quarter-louvers are in excellent order as well and all original glass is in place. Shut lines are to factory standards, the doors close with vault-like precision, and this car shows no evidence of any prior corrosion or accident damage. It rides on a set of Mercedes’ iconic Bundt alloy wheels in fabulous condition, wrapped in appropriate Pirelli P3000 blackwall radials, delivering the ideal balance of touring comfort and handling prowess. Original lamps, lenses, and the factory-fitted fog lamps all appear in excellent order. This is one of the finest of its kind we have had the pleasure to offer, a truly beautiful example that captures the understated elegance of this oft under-appreciated model. Inside is more of the same; exceptionally well-preserved original materials and finishes presented in beautiful order. The blue upholstery shows hardly any signs of use, appearing more like a two year old car rather than 38 years old. The driver’s seat is barely broken in, while the passenger and rear seats appear factory fresh. Blue velour carpets are in excellent order, again appearing virtually factory fresh and unsullied, with original MB Star logo overmats. The center console is adorned with beautiful burlwood trim, which repeats on a narrow strip across the dash. Typically a trouble spot on these models, this example appears in beautiful condition with no cracking, crazing or lifting of the veneer. Original HVAC controls appear in excellent order and even the original Becker Mexico Cassette remains in its rightful place in the dash. Instruments, switches and controls are all factory original and in lovely original condition. Even the trunk appears in showroom fresh condition. Lifting the original carpeted panel reveals an untouched spare wheel with original Michelin spare tire, complete with the original tag pertaining to the alloy wheel fitment. A tool roll containing beautiful, unused factory tools is included, as well as the original jack and even the safety triangle. Also included is a comprehensive array of original factory literature, books, and manuals covering all aspects of the car’s operation, many of which appear untouched since new. The engine bay is similarly exceptional, with original finishes, markings and decals all in place as one would expect from a pampered 32,000 mile example. The original gold cadmium plating remains bright, correct hose clamps are fitted and the entire engine bay is tidy and clean, without appearing to have been restored or excessively detailed. While the 450 SLC’s open-topped sibling may be the more well-known, enthusiasts know that the SLC is far rarer, and finely preserved examples such as this are exceptionally scarce. Finished in timeless colors and presented in beautiful condition from top to bottom, this 450 SLC surely is one of the best-preserved examples of its type.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1934 Lincoln KA High Hat Limousine

    $129,500(£100,608.55)

    In 1922, Henry Ford exacted revenge on his former nemesis Henry Leland by purchasing the Lincoln Motor Company for $8M. Some twenty years prior, a group of investors led by Leland had forced Henry Ford out of his own business, going to reorganize and re-launch it as Cadillac. Leland soon left Cadillac to found Lincoln Motor Company with his son, and despite a lucrative contract during World War I to supply Liberty aero engines, the company soon hit hard times. Ford was more than happy to bail out Leland, however at a heavily discounted price, a deliberate jab to the man who caused Ford to start from scratch so many years prior. Ford successfully purchased Lincoln, swiftly forcing Leland and his son out of the company. But what was bad for Henry Leland proved quite good for Lincoln Motor Company. Henry Ford put his son Edsel in charge, who wasted little time improving quality and expanding product offerings. By 1923, sales had risen 45 percent, and the company was finally turning a profit. Lincoln was now fully established as a genuine competitor in the luxury marketplace, The K-series was Lincoln’s first all-new product since Leland’s ouster, replacing the ageing and expensive L-series. The K was made available as either a V8-powered KA or V12-powered KB series. A variety of wheelbases and coachbuilt body styles could satisfy virtually any client’s wishes. Ford contracted with a number of premier coachbuilders of the day, such as Brunn, Murphy, Judkins LeBaron and Rollston. By the 1934 model year, the K-series was combined into a single line. The V8 engine had been dropped several years before, as had the small-displacement V12. The only engine available was the beautiful and powerful 414 cubic inch (6.8 liter) twelve-cylinder which would go on to power the K through the end of its run. Mechanically, the KA and KB were identical, with the wheelbase being the only difference between the two. As before, Lincolns were bodied by any number of high quality coachbuilders, including Murray, with whom Ford had a long standing relationship. Murray was primarily a body builder, producing bodies for the likes of Dietrich, as well as for many of Ford’s more pedestrian and commercial models. But they had the skill and facilities to produce limited high-end bodies as well, such as the one fitted to our featured 1934 Lincoln KA. This handsome 1934 Lincoln K-Series V12 (S/N KA2938) wears a rare and interesting High Hat Limousine body by Murray and has been treated to a high quality restoration, which remains in very good and well-maintained condition. It is finished in an understated shade of dark blue, which is accented by gray wire wheels and gray coachlines. While the color combination is understated, the same cannot be said about the rather imposing proportions of the body. The High Hat limousine was of course designed for the gentleman of high social standing who did not wish to remove his hat when climbing aboard, and the rear compartment is generously proportioned with additional head room. The roof is upholstered in black, lending an attractive and formal appearance. Paint quality and body finishing was executed to a high standard, and the car is well detailed with good quality brightwork and fine original equipment. It wears a pair of chrome Flexbeam headlights, dual Trippe Light driving lamps, and a greyhound radiator mascot. Dual sidemount spare wheels adorn the fenders, and a large trunk with an upholstered cover rides on a chrome plated trunk rack. Wide whitewall tires on painted wire wheels continue the theme of formal elegance. The interior is all about traditional limousine accommodations. The driver’s compartment is trimmed in black leather, as it was a harder-wearing material that would not show dirt. The dash is nicely equipped with correct instruments that appear to be in excellent original condition. Beautifully detailed diamond-pattern wood trim adorns the door tops, which has been nicely restored with a period appropriate finish that doesn’t appear over-restored. An opening divider window separates driver from passengers. Rear passengers are treated to a luxurious cabin trimmed in gray broadcloth with matching gray carpeting. The same diamond-pattern wood continues on the door caps, quarter window sills and divider window sill. A pair of jump seats can be deployed for two occasional passengers and the rearmost quarter windows crank open to allow for an airy cabin, an unusual feature for a formal limousine. The quality of the trim and finishing is excellent and the car presents in tidy, clean and attractive order. Lincoln’s alloy-head 414 cubic inch V12 produced 150 horsepower in the typically silky-smooth manner of a 1930s multi-cylinder engine. This example is pleasingly well detailed, showing signs of careful use and regular maintenance since completion, with mainly period correct fittings and hardware. This car was awarded an AACA Senior award in 2012 as well as a CCCA National 1st Place, a testament to the quality and detail put into the restoration. The fascinating body is certainly a talking point, while the K-series chassis and lovely V12 engine make it a fantastic choice for touring. As a CCCA-recognized Full Classic, this Lincoln remains in showable condition, yet would also make a fine and comfortable choice for touring.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1951 Crosley Super Sport Convertible

    $39,500(£30,687.55)

    Powel Crosley Jr. was an inventive man, building his first car by the age of fourteen and creating a home built generator to power his family home in about 1900. He sold novelty items door-to-door before becoming a self-made millionaire by offering America’s first low cost radios and home refrigerators. But since the time he built his first vehicle, Crosley’s passion lay with the automobile. He became infatuated with the idea of a small, lightweight motorcar in the early 20th century, during the short-lived cyclecar craze in America. In spite of his booming radio business, the idea of building his own car persisted. After a couple of failed attempts, the idea of the Crosley as we know it began to materialize in the mid-1930s. America was in the throes of the Great Depression when Crosley’s idea of an affordable, efficient small car was just coming to fruition. With the help of two outside engineers, and with his brother as executive vice president, the first Crosley car appeared at the 1939 World’s Fair in New York. Initially powered by a 2-cylinder Waukesha engine (derived from an orchard sprayer), the diminutive car sat on an 80” wheelbase with a 40” track and weighed in at under 1000 pounds. Early cars suffered from numerous issues, however, they were ironed out just in time for WWII to halt automobile production. Post War, Crosley resumed production, beating most of the major car makers to the market with fresh products by a year or more. The Crosley was updated with a 717cc OHC inline four dubbed “CoBra” (Copper Brazed). Problems persited however, so the CoBra was replaced with a new cast engine (CIBA) that was far and away the most advanced offered in any American car at the time. Rather interestingly, the CIBA went on to power a great many Italian Etceterini 750cc class racers, such was its strength and power potential. Even Powel Crosley saw the sporting potential, introducing the sporty but basic Hotshot roadster in 1949. The Hotshot had a bit of a novelty charm to it, but it was a serious competitor, winning the Index of Performance at Sebring in 1951. To supplement sales, Crosley followed the Hotshot with the SuperSports, which added doors and a rudimentary top to the Hotshot platform. Sadly, Crosley could not compete on price with the Big Three, and his mission to alter American tastes on small cars failed, with all production ceasing after 1951. This delightful 1951 Crosley Super Sports is a very desirable late production car fitted from new with the robust and high-revving CIBA engine. This car has spent its entire life as a racer, and has recently been treated to a nut and bolt restoration featuring many period correct speed parts, and is presented in a period “race-ready” style. Being a Super Sports, it is fitted with full doors (as opposed to the open cockpit Hotshot), and the body is in very good order with straight panels and factory appropriate fit. It is finished in a pleasing shade of pale yellow, accented by a dark red offset stripe down the body, as well as rocker stripes and white roundels on the doors. The quality of the paint work is excellent, far and above what we normally see on similar cars. The body has the full race treatment, complete with a full-width cut down windscreen, no bumpers and no trim. A pair of rollover hoops have been fitted and there’s a tiny, Crosley-sized Monza fuel filler cap on the rear of the body. It rides on the smallest set of Halibrand wheels we’ve ever seen complete with knock offs and 165/70 R12 Yokohama tires. The presentation is both charming yet purposeful, leaving little doubt that this could be a serious racing machine in spite of its diminutive scale. Inside is understandably basic. The original style seats trimmed in dark red upholstery to complement the body stripes. As appropriate for a racer there is no carpet, but the floors are lined in pyramid-pattern rubber mat which has been nicely fitted and finished. The dash is a simple sheetmetal affair, with an array of Stewart Warner dials monitoring speed, revs, oil pressure, fuel and temperature. The original steering wheel remains, which has been restored to a high quality finish. While this is a simple machine, it is very well presented with quality fit and finish. The “CIBA” four-cylinder presents very nicely in the engine bay, in clean, purposeful and tidy order. The engine has been upgraded for race duty with an array of original Brajo speed parts including a finned side cover, finned cam cover and intake manifold. The engine is fed by a massive single Weber 40 DCOE carburetor, and gasses are expelled via a beautiful tuned tubular header. This delightful little Crosley is said to have spent its whole life as a race car, and the previous owner even embarked on a bit of racing himself, however the car remains in outstanding order, having seen very little track time. We imagine it would make an excellent entry into VSCCA competition and would be an absolute joy on hillclimbs, rallies or circuit races. This is a rare opportunity to acquire what was one of the most advanced American cars of its day, prepared for sport with genuine, period correct speed equipment and finished to a very high standard. Very few of these cars were built, and fewer still survived the rigors of motorsport as well as this example.  

    Last update: 29 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1949 Bentley Mark VI Pininfarina Cabriolet

    $575,000(£446,717.50)

    The MkVI was Bentley’s first truly modern post-war design and quite significantly, it marked the first time in the history of the marque that a fully factory-built car could be bought right off of a showroom floor. Prior to the MkVI, both Bentley and its parent company Rolls-Royce supplied buyers and dealers with a running chassis only, relying on independent coachbuilders to handle the bodywork. But with the MkVI the new Standard Steel Saloon body (manufactured by Pressed Steel, Ltd) offered buyers a handsome, albeit conservatively styled motorcar at a more affordable price than traditional custom coachwork. Of course, for the more well-heeled clients who wished for something a bit more bespoke, Bentley remained more than happy to oblige in supplying a chassis to any number of traditional coachbuilders. Mechanically, the MkVI was loosely related to late pre-war models, with independent front suspension on the robust ladder chassis and a 4.25 liter inline six. When properly maintained, the MkVI is a reliable and robust motorcar with that exhibits a delightfully over-engineered feeling. 4,946 examples were produced, until it was ultimately replaced by the R-Type. A majority of the cars left the Crewe works wearing Standard Steel Saloon coachwork, though a small number of MkVI chassis received fully custom and modified standard bodies by the likes of James Young, Park Ward, Mulliner, Freestone and Webb and others. A majority of these custom bodied MkVI chassis were constructed by British coachbuilders, though just a handful of cars were shipped overseas and skinned by the likes of Franay, Graber, and in the case of our subject car, Pinin Farina. Understated and elegant, this 1949 Bentley MkVI wears a very special and unique one-off cabriolet body by Pinin Farina, commissioned by Dr. Willi Spieler of Switzerland. Chassis number B435CD was cleared from chassis testing in May of 1948, before being shipped to Turin to receive its new body. Personally penned by Batista “Pinin” Farina, the MkVI was bodied under his supervision and completed in time to be unveiled at the 1949 Geneva Salon. It was then delivered to the selling dealer, and assigned its first registration, BM1949. A scant few Bentley MkVI chassis were bodied by the great Italian Carrozzeria, the most famous of those being fixed the Facel-built fixed head coupes. It is believed that no other open cars were constructed in the same style as this. It is said that Batista’s son Sergio as well as his grandson Paolo felt this elegant Bentley cabriolet was one of their favorite creations from the great designer. The early life of B435CD was spent motoring around Geneva until the death of the Dr. Spieler. It then passed to a Canadian enthusiast who carefully disassembled for restoration, selling it to a noted enthusiast Philip Chartrand. Dr. Chartrand restored the car with the help of his friends, having the drivetrain rebuilt by highly respected marque experts Frank & Bill Cooke of Vintage Garage in Massachusetts. Problems with the initial work led Dr. Chartrand to hand the car over to Richard Grenon Antique Auto Restoration for a professional, concours quality restoration. It later received its lush blue interior and blue mohair hood from Hilborn Motor Car Interiors of Reseda California. B435CD was shown extensively and received many accolades including a Best in Class (Pininfarina coachwork) at the 1993 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, Best in Show at the 1997 British Invasion in Stowe, Vermont, a second appearance at Pebble Beach in 2006, and a First Prize at the Cannes Concours d’Elegance in 2013. Today, this rare and handsome Bentley remains in excellent condition having seen light, careful use since the restoration. The silver paint is understated, nicely highlighting the sophisticated Pinin Farina lines. Typical for the great Carrozzeria, the body is left largely free of flashy chrome, relying instead on finely sculpted surfaces and subtle linear trim on the rockers and belt lines. The traditional Bentley radiator shell remains, of course, and the car is very elegant, looking years younger than its factory-bodied siblings. Bosch headlamps and apron-mounted driving lamps hint at the car’s early history is Switzerland. The body remains straight, with very good paint and excellent panel fit and finish quality. The cabin continues the theme of sophisticated elegance with its dark blue leather trim and clean, unfussy styling. The dash houses a set of standard Bentley instruments as well as an original radio mounted under the dash while a modern AM/FM CD player has been discreetly integrated under the seat. The standard MKVI layout of right hand drive with a right hand shift lever remains, as does the standard Bentley wheel complete with levers to control throttle, ride control and mixture. The blue leather features subtle grey piping and it remains in excellent condition, showing only slight creasing from use but remaining taut and supple. Carpets, door cards, interior fittings and the lined mohair hood all remain in excellent condition. The boot is trimmed in correct materials and outfitted with the original spare wheel, jack, handle and wheel cover tool. Bentley’s smooth and powerful 4.25 liter inline six cylinder engine is very well presented in the bay. Correct black finishes on the rocker cover, air cleaner and other ancillaries are in excellent order, clearly showing this car’s concours history yet remaining fully functional and ready for use. Following the restoration and its years as a show winner, this beautiful and significant Bentley has been meticulously maintained and enjoyed on a great number of tours and rallies by its most recent European owner. It remains in beautiful condition and is ready for enjoyment; an important and unique piece melding two of the greatest names in automotive history, Bentley and Pinin Farina.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale