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Hyman Ltd Cars for sale

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  • 1955 Jaguar XK 140 M Roadster

    POA

    5920 1955 Jaguar XK 140 M OTS Following hot on the heels of Jaguar’s seminal XK 120 was the revised and refined XK 140. When the XK 120 first hit the streets in 1948 it was the first proper sports car from Jaguar since the pre-war SS100 and it became the car that truly put the marque in the mainstream. Seemingly from nowhere, this exotic and beautiful automobile offered astounding performance from its 160 horsepower twin-overhead cam inline six cylinder engine, all for less than $4,000. While the list price was not exactly cheap, it was often far below its competitors and offered much greater performance for the money. The standard XK 120 was followed up with “M” and “MC” versions (Modified and Modified, C-Type head) also known as SE in other markets. These high performance variants boosted horsepower from the standard 160 bhp to 180 bhp and 210 bhp respectively. The XK 120 proved popular among American servicemen who had caught the sports car bug while serving in Europe in the early post-war years and became a fixture of the early days of American road racing, establishing Jaguar as a premier sports car manufacturer. Hesitant to mess with success, Jaguar released the next generation of the XK series in mid-1954. Now called the XK 140, the new car was quite similar in outward appearance, though some modern refinements were made to the body and the undercarriage. The engine was moved forward by three inches to address complaints of cramped accommodations of its predecessor. The standard engine was now the 190 horsepower version of the 3.4 liter inline six, with the return of the M option (SE in other markets) and its 210 horsepower output. Straight line performance was about the same as the XK120 thanks to a bit of added weight from the bulkier full-width bumpers and additional trim. But the road holding had been vastly improved thanks to the addition of rack and pinion steering, telescopic dampers, larger brakes and additional suspension travel. These improvements made the XK 140 more comfortable, predictable and enjoyable to drive. As before, three body styles – a fixed head coupe, open two-seat roadster (OTS) and drophead coupe were available, with the OTS Roadster being the most overtly sporting of the three. Our featured XK 140 is a 1955 O.T.S. in original M-specification, finished in Carmen red over black leather. This is a lovely, matching numbers example that has been restored to a high level, earning consistently high points at Jaguar Club North America concours. The previous owner was a dedicated enthusiast who enjoyed show preparation, and the car shows it in the excellent detailing and presentation. Finishef in the correct original Carmen red iapplied over excellent bodywork with superb panel fit and finish quality. Chrome bumpers are straight and plated to a high standard and it wears a pair of period correct Lucas fog lamps along with correct detailing, badges and lamps. The convertible top of the OTS is a simple affair that hides behind the seats. The frame is correctly painted dove gray and trimmed with black Stayfast canvas. Restored original side-curtains are included. This crisp, sharp XK140 rides on a set of chrome wire wheels wrapped in blackwall bias ply tires as original. It is a lovely, striking combination that captures the sporting essence of the XK140 beautifully. Black leather upholstery lends a sharp contrast against the Carmen red paintwork. The cockpit rails are trimmed in black as original, and the leather remains in very good condition, showing just the slightest bit of creasing from use since the restoration was completed. Seats and black carpets are excellent, and the door panels and kick panels are upholstered in correct materials. Instruments are restored Smiths units as original, mounted in the central panel, trimmed in leather for the sporting OTS rather than the more opulent wood of the drophead coupe. The boot is correctly trimmed in Hardura and includes a tool roll with a full complement of original tools. The legendary XK six-cylinder engine is, in our opinion, one of the best looking power plants of all time. The signature polished cam covers, painted cylinder head, and polished intake and carburetors make it a piece of kinetic art. This fine example is very well detailed, as the previous owner enjoyed showing the car in JCNA events. Proper hardware, fittings and labels adorn the engine and underhood accessories. The quality restoration has been documented via an included photo album of the process, and JCNA judging sheets show the level of detail sought by the previous owner. This is very fine quality example in highly desirable M-specification, and thanks to that 210 horsepower engine and well-sorted nature, it would be a fine choice for drivers while remaining fresh enough for a concours.

    Last update: About 4 Hours Old
    For sale
    Hyman Ltd
    314-524-6000 VIEW CONTACT NUMBER
  • 1979 Mercedes-Benz 450SLC Coupe

    $52,500(£40,582.50)

    Following up on the commercial success of the R113-series 230, 250 and 280SL, Mercedes-Benz unveiled the all-new and thoroughly modern R107-series in 1971. The 107 continued along the path forged by the R113 that set the foundation of the SL-class as we know it today. The R113 was the car that took the engineering excellence of the original 300SL and combined it with the broader market appeal of the junior 190SL, in a package that was sporty, civilized and exceptionally well-rounded. The SL was now a sports car for those who preferred to arrive in style yet remain completely unruffled, an ethos that remains in the DNA of today’s SL roadsters. Introduced in late 1971, the R107 further refined the theme set forth by the R113, albeit on an all-new platform that was larger, more rigid, and wrapped in finely detailed styling. It was also the first new model to benefit fully from Mercedes’ obsession with safety that began in the late 1960s. From its introduction, it was designed to carry both six-cylinder and a new line V8 engines. Suspension was fully independent all around, backed by four wheel disc brakes and a robust unibody chassis. Alongside the traditional roadster with its optional removable hard top, Mercedes-Benz also unveiled a full four seat version with a fixed roof and extended wheelbase. This new model, dubbed “SLC” replaced the ageing W111-based 280SE and marked the first time their flagship four-seat coupe was based not on a sedan platform, but the sporting SL platform. The SLC shared the same suspension, braking and powertrain components as its open-topped sibling, but benefitted from an exceptionally rigid platform with the fixed roof. Combined with the longer wheelbase, and the larger 4.5 liter version of the alloy V8, the SLC delivered robust performance and exceptional ride quality. Typical for a Mercedes-Benz SL-class car, the SLC was tuned for high-speed touring rather than outright corner-carving ability. But in spite of its grand touring pretenses and soft-sprung nature, the SLC was quite a capable sporting car – with predictable handling, excellent grip and powerful brakes. In fact, the SLC became a rather successful (albeit unlikely) rally competitor through the 1970s and into the 1980s. The 107 platform was such a success that it became the longest running passenger car model in Mercedes history (only being outlasted by the G-Wagen off-roader) and has become a favorite among collectors and enthusiasts the world over, thanks to its exceptional longevity, timeless style and tank-like build quality. This 1979 Mercedes-Benz 450SLC is a beautiful, unrestored example showing a genuine 31,354 miles from new. It is finished in its original shade of Gray-Blau metallic (code 906G) over a blue interior and presents in stunning condition inside and out. It is a well-optioned model with factory fitted sunroof, power locks and windows, automatic climate control, Tempomat cruise control and alloy wheels. The body is exceptionally straight, with all original belt moldings, rocker moldings and bumpers in excellent order. Chrome and anodized brightwork is outstanding, with no dings, dents or corrosion to speak of. The SLC’s signature quarter-louvers are in excellent order as well and all original glass is in place. Shut lines are to factory standards, the doors close with vault-like precision, and this car shows no evidence of any prior corrosion or accident damage. It rides on a set of Mercedes’ iconic Bundt alloy wheels in fabulous condition, wrapped in appropriate Pirelli P3000 blackwall radials, delivering the ideal balance of touring comfort and handling prowess. Original lamps, lenses, and the factory-fitted fog lamps all appear in excellent order. This is one of the finest of its kind we have had the pleasure to offer, a truly beautiful example that captures the understated elegance of this oft under-appreciated model. Inside is more of the same; exceptionally well-preserved original materials and finishes presented in beautiful order. The blue upholstery shows hardly any signs of use, appearing more like a two year old car rather than 38 years old. The driver’s seat is barely broken in, while the passenger and rear seats appear factory fresh. Blue velour carpets are in excellent order, again appearing virtually factory fresh and unsullied, with original MB Star logo overmats. The center console is adorned with beautiful burlwood trim, which repeats on a narrow strip across the dash. Typically a trouble spot on these models, this example appears in beautiful condition with no cracking, crazing or lifting of the veneer. Original HVAC controls appear in excellent order and even the original Becker Mexico Cassette remains in its rightful place in the dash. Instruments, switches and controls are all factory original and in lovely original condition. Even the trunk appears in showroom fresh condition. Lifting the original carpeted panel reveals an untouched spare wheel with original Michelin spare tire, complete with the original tag pertaining to the alloy wheel fitment. A tool roll containing beautiful, unused factory tools is included, as well as the original jack and even the safety triangle. Also included is a comprehensive array of original factory literature, books, and manuals covering all aspects of the car’s operation, many of which appear untouched since new. The engine bay is similarly exceptional, with original finishes, markings and decals all in place as one would expect from a pampered 32,000 mile example. The original gold cadmium plating remains bright, correct hose clamps are fitted and the entire engine bay is tidy and clean, without appearing to have been restored or excessively detailed. While the 450 SLC’s open-topped sibling may be the more well-known, enthusiasts know that the SLC is far rarer, and finely preserved examples such as this are exceptionally scarce. Finished in timeless colors and presented in beautiful condition from top to bottom, this 450 SLC surely is one of the best-preserved examples of its type.

    Last update: 4 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1937 Cord 812 Custom Berline

    $169,500(£131,023.50)

    The highly advanced Cord 810/812 was born of the anxious economic times when many prestigious auto makers were focusing on entry-level lines in hopes of bolstering lagging sales of their extravagant, high-end offerings. During the Great Depression, the wealthiest of clients were reluctant to flaunt their status, and even the once mighty Duesenberg felt the fallout. In order to attract new clients, company brass decided they needed a “baby Duesenberg” to compete with the likes of LaSalle, Packard’s Junior series, and others. But they hesitated and pulled the plug on the project for fear that it would cheapen the illustrious Duesenberg name. Enter E.L Cord, the brash, confident industrialist who had previously enjoyed the prestige of an automobile that bore his own name and he desperately wanted to revive his own brand. He saw great potential in the preliminary design of the so called “baby Duesenberg” and he determined it would be perfect for a dramatic resurgence of Cord Automobiles. The development was revitalized, and Cord charged his engineers to push the technical envelope. Inspiration was drawn from the Citroen Traction Avant, and the car was constructed a semi-monocoque chassis, front wheel drive, a pre-selector gearbox and independent front suspension. In place of the traditional radiator grille, Buehrig and his team of designers drew a series of wrap around louvers flanked by rounded fenders with retractable headlamps – the first automobile so equipped. Due to the front wheel drive layout, the body was set low and running boards were shunned in place of fully extended doors and a clean, minimalist look. Eight decades later, the Cord 810/812 remains one of the most beautiful and iconic American automobile designs. A variety of open and closed styles were offered, from formal to sporting. The closed car lineup started by the Westchester, followed by the Beverly, Custom Beverly and range-topping Berline, the latter two riding on an extended wheelbase. The most distinguishing feature between the Westchester and Beverly was the addition of a “bustle” trunk on the on the Beverly. It also offered more luxurious trappings inside, with additional trim and equipment. Our featured example is a very special Custom Berline, one of one originally built on a 135-inch wheelbase (vs the standard 132”). Wearing chassis number 10217B, this 1937 812 is unique among the approximately 50 Berlines produced. It is a very correct, highly awarded example that has been carefully restored by a marque enthusiast. It is presented in a very elegant black color scheme, with black wheels and polished hub caps as per original. The restoration is excellent with lovely paint, excellent fit of the doors and panels, and high quality plating on the bumpers and minimalist exterior trim. Even in black, the body is straight, with clean reflections and a deep gloss. A pair of original Cord fog lamps on the front apron are the only adornment on the clean and elegant body, which features the 8-louvered grille that signified the upper echelon models. The car has been enjoyed sparingly since the restoration, showing only light signs of use. The luxurious interior is trimmed in lovely brown leather up front, which is piped in a subtle contrasting deep maroon that repeats on the dash, door cards and steering column. Cord’s signature instrument panel is spectacularly presented with its polished, engine turned alloy fascia and an array of aircraft-inspired gauges. It is equipped, as original, with a heater and a radio. What set the Berline apart from its lesser brethren is the divider window to the passenger compartment. This example features an opening divider, and a rear passenger compartment trimmed in tan broadcloth upholstery, which is also piped in the same deep red to complement the driver’s compartment. The upholstery quality is excellent, again showing very little use since restoration. The additional wheelbase was added to the rear quarters, affording plenty of room for rear occupants. To match the rear compartment, the headlining is trimmed in the same tan broadcloth and accented with piping to a beautiful effect. Door panels and interior fittings are of similar high quality, with excellent fittings and detail. Beneath the “coffin nose” hood is the standard normally-aspirated Lycoming 289 cubic inch Lycoming V8 mated to a solenoid actuated pre-select transmission. The engine is very nicely detailed with quality paintwork on the ancillaries, and a tidy, clean appearance. As with the undercarriage, the engine has an appealing, clean look of a quality restoration. This beautiful and elegant automobile is believed to have been used by the Cord family when new, and has been in the hands of its previous owner for over a decade. As a testament to the quality of the restoration and attention to detail, this Cord 812 has earned a series of prestigious accolades including an AACA National First Prize (2000), an AACA Grand National award (2004) a highly coveted ACD Club (Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg) Senior award and a CCCA Senior award. It remains in beautiful order and is certain to be a welcome sight at virtually any show, concours or road tour. This is a rare opportunity to acquire one of the rarest and most elegant coffin-nose Cords ever produced.

    Last update: 4 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1934 Lincoln KA High Hat Limousine

    $129,500(£100,103.50)

    In 1922, Henry Ford exacted revenge on his former nemesis Henry Leland by purchasing the Lincoln Motor Company for $8M. Some twenty years prior, a group of investors led by Leland had forced Henry Ford out of his own business, going to reorganize and re-launch it as Cadillac. Leland soon left Cadillac to found Lincoln Motor Company with his son, and despite a lucrative contract during World War I to supply Liberty aero engines, the company soon hit hard times. Ford was more than happy to bail out Leland, however at a heavily discounted price, a deliberate jab to the man who caused Ford to start from scratch so many years prior. Ford successfully purchased Lincoln, swiftly forcing Leland and his son out of the company. But what was bad for Henry Leland proved quite good for Lincoln Motor Company. Henry Ford put his son Edsel in charge, who wasted little time improving quality and expanding product offerings. By 1923, sales had risen 45 percent, and the company was finally turning a profit. Lincoln was now fully established as a genuine competitor in the luxury marketplace, The K-series was Lincoln’s first all-new product since Leland’s ouster, replacing the ageing and expensive L-series. The K was made available as either a V8-powered KA or V12-powered KB series. A variety of wheelbases and coachbuilt body styles could satisfy virtually any client’s wishes. Ford contracted with a number of premier coachbuilders of the day, such as Brunn, Murphy, Judkins LeBaron and Rollston. By the 1934 model year, the K-series was combined into a single line. The V8 engine had been dropped several years before, as had the small-displacement V12. The only engine available was the beautiful and powerful 414 cubic inch (6.8 liter) twelve-cylinder which would go on to power the K through the end of its run. Mechanically, the KA and KB were identical, with the wheelbase being the only difference between the two. As before, Lincolns were bodied by any number of high quality coachbuilders, including Murray, with whom Ford had a long standing relationship. Murray was primarily a body builder, producing bodies for the likes of Dietrich, as well as for many of Ford’s more pedestrian and commercial models. But they had the skill and facilities to produce limited high-end bodies as well, such as the one fitted to our featured 1934 Lincoln KA. This handsome 1934 Lincoln K-Series V12 (S/N KA2938) wears a rare and interesting High Hat Limousine body by Murray and has been treated to a high quality restoration, which remains in very good and well-maintained condition. It is finished in an understated shade of dark blue, which is accented by gray wire wheels and gray coachlines. While the color combination is understated, the same cannot be said about the rather imposing proportions of the body. The High Hat limousine was of course designed for the gentleman of high social standing who did not wish to remove his hat when climbing aboard, and the rear compartment is generously proportioned with additional head room. The roof is upholstered in black, lending an attractive and formal appearance. Paint quality and body finishing was executed to a high standard, and the car is well detailed with good quality brightwork and fine original equipment. It wears a pair of chrome Flexbeam headlights, dual Trippe Light driving lamps, and a greyhound radiator mascot. Dual sidemount spare wheels adorn the fenders, and a large trunk with an upholstered cover rides on a chrome plated trunk rack. Wide whitewall tires on painted wire wheels continue the theme of formal elegance. The interior is all about traditional limousine accommodations. The driver’s compartment is trimmed in black leather, as it was a harder-wearing material that would not show dirt. The dash is nicely equipped with correct instruments that appear to be in excellent original condition. Beautifully detailed diamond-pattern wood trim adorns the door tops, which has been nicely restored with a period appropriate finish that doesn’t appear over-restored. An opening divider window separates driver from passengers. Rear passengers are treated to a luxurious cabin trimmed in gray broadcloth with matching gray carpeting. The same diamond-pattern wood continues on the door caps, quarter window sills and divider window sill. A pair of jump seats can be deployed for two occasional passengers and the rearmost quarter windows crank open to allow for an airy cabin, an unusual feature for a formal limousine. The quality of the trim and finishing is excellent and the car presents in tidy, clean and attractive order. Lincoln’s alloy-head 414 cubic inch V12 produced 150 horsepower in the typically silky-smooth manner of a 1930s multi-cylinder engine. This example is pleasingly well detailed, showing signs of careful use and regular maintenance since completion, with mainly period correct fittings and hardware. This car was awarded an AACA Senior award in 2012 as well as a CCCA National 1st Place, a testament to the quality and detail put into the restoration. The fascinating body is certainly a talking point, while the K-series chassis and lovely V12 engine make it a fantastic choice for touring. As a CCCA-recognized Full Classic, this Lincoln remains in showable condition, yet would also make a fine and comfortable choice for touring.

    Last update: 4 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1959 AC Aceca Coupe

    $189,500(£146,483.50)

    A.C. has a long tradition of building sporting motorcars, dating back to the early 1920s. The company’s roots go back to 1908 as Auto Carriers, where they produced motorized vehicles for tradesmen and delivery purposes. In 1921, new management arrived and A.C. Cars Ltd was founded, with great emphasis put on racing and record breaking in order to build the brand. Success came quickly with the first British victory in the 1926 Monte Carlo rally. Production of various sporting saloons and touring cars trickled on through WWII, when the works produced a variety of wartime products, making a very handy profit along the way. In the early 1950s, with saloon sales dwindling, A.C.’s owners decided a new direction was needed. They partnered with a young designer named John Tojeiro who was making a name for himself in sports car racing with his tubular framed, alloy skinned race cars. Tojeiro was brought on board to design a new sports car that utilized A.C.’s own inline six, as well as the Bristol-sourced 2.0 liter inline six. The Ace roadster was first shown at the 1953 Earls Court Motor Show with production versions arriving one year later. In 1955 the pretty Ace roadster was joined by the two-seat fixed-head Aceca coupe. The beautiful coupe, like the roadster, could be optioned with either the AC or Bristol engine and it proved a worthy competitor in amateur GT racing. Production of the Aceca was very low, however, with just 349 built over a nine-year period before A.C. shifted focus to their most famous car to date, the sensational Cobra. This striking AC Aceca coupe is one of just 48 built in 1959 and is one of just a handful originally equipped with the A.C. inline-six cylinder engine. It is a handsome car that has been carefully prepared for event use, while still remaining in beautiful show-worthy condition and entirely streetable. The paintwork pays homage to the famous Ecurie Ecosse team livery, with its rich blue accented by a white band around the bonnet and white roundels on the doors. Paint quality is excellent, particularly for a rally car, and the detailing is outstanding. Brightwork is limited to bumpererettes, window trim and lamps, all of which appears in very good order. The car sits purposefully on a set of wide-rim 72 spoke wire wheels, painted in dark gray as would be appropriate for a racing car of the period. Proper black wall tires give the right look and allow the brilliant handling of the Tojeiro chassis to shine through. Side exiting exhaust and a huge, polished Monza-style fuel filler completes the look. The cabin follows closely with original, having been restored to a high standard while incorporating the necessary safety features for serious rallying. Safety enhancements include a subtly integrated roll cage with side-entry bars, period seats with four-point harnesses, on board fire suppression system and regulation exterior electrical shut-offs. All of the modifications have been done with a subtle, period correct feel that does not detract from the appealing beauty of the Aceca. The seats are trimmed in red leather and red panels line the interior and cargo hatch.  Carpeting is limited to the central tunnel, with bare alloy floors lending a purposeful feel. A beautiful three spoke wood wheel faces original instruments, and a series of additional dials keeping watch on all vital functions. As with the exterior, the interior is purposeful, beautifully crafted and ready for sporting duty. A.C.s inline six may date back to the 1920s, but it was a remarkably versatile engine that produced over 100 horsepower in standard trim by 1959, and remained in production until 1963. This example has been carefully uprated for rally duty with a trio of big S.U. carburetors outfitted with velocity stacks along with an alloy radiator, electric fans, an alternator, and gorgeous custom tuned exhaust headers. Performance is outstanding and the engine sounds positively glorious breathing through those big carbs and the raspy exhaust. Not only is this a proven and exceptional event car, having competed at the 2015 Copperstate 1000, (among other events) it has also been shown at prestigious concours such as the Concours d’Elegance of America at St. John’s. This rare and beautifully restored A.C. Aceca is a magnificent all-rounder that is ready for enjoyment.

    Last update: 10 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1966 Ford Bronco U13 Roadster

    $69,500(£53,723.50)

    Following World War II, the idea of a civilian-focused  utility vehicle gradually began to catch on among manufacturers and buyers alike. The Willys Jeep had made a name for itself serving in virtually every theater of the war, and the civilian version sold respectably well among farmers, businesses, utilities or anyone that needed a vehicle capable of traversing rugged terrain. In conjunction with the “domesticated” Jeep, the British had developed the Land Rover, a similarly versatile vehicle but with alloy body. Both the Land Rover and the Jeep were primarily purchased for their versatility in the field, they were not considered for their style nor did they find much favor as recreational vehicles. But in the early 1960s that began to change. Soon Jeep began to offer more equipment and comfort options to appeal to a broader audience and vehicles such as the International Scout and Toyota Land Cruiser competed for buyers. As sales picked up, companies looked for new ways to broaden the appeal of their utility vehicles and marketing departments began targeting youthful, outdoorsy-types. Jeeps, Scouts and Cruisers became popular beach vehicles and the ideal machine for sportsmen to access their favorite grounds. It didn’t take long for Ford to realize they were missing out on an important market. In 1966, Ford was still riding the wave of success created by the Mustang. They had a firm grasp on the youth market, and as utility vehicles became increasingly popular among young buyers, Ford introduced the Bronco to the market. The Bronco was a two-door, short wheelbase (just 92 inches) four-wheel drive truck which was based on an all-new platform, with unique body, frame and suspension. It was powered by existing Ford engines and borrowed from the F-series pickups for the drivetrain. A variety of trims packages were available, and the Bronco was offered as a station wagon, half-cab pickup or roadster. The styling was simple and functional with flat-pane glass, simple bumpers and minimal chrome trim yet still attractive thanks to the contoured body sides. Ford did not forget the foundation of the off-road vehicle market, and the Bronco could be equipped with a power takeoff, winch, and tow bar, among many other accessories. Ford even made sure to modify the 170 cubic inch inline-six to better handle off-road situations, with solid lifters and a carburetor designed to work at steep inclines. The original Bronco became a mainstay of the off-roader market and remains hugely popular among off-road enthusiasts today. Of the original three body styles offered, the Roadster, often known by its body code “U13”, is the rarest. Just 5,000 were produced over three years before the option was dropped due to slow sales. The U13 Roadster differed from its siblings in that it was the most overtly sporty of the three body styles. Intended as a sporty and functional beach buggy, the U13 Roadster is most notable for the lack of doors, no top and ultra-basic interior trim. The spare wheel is affixed to the inside of the tailgate and all came with distinct silver upholstery. The U13 may have been a little too utilitarian to appeal to most buyers, and those who did purchase the roadster often used them hard, so survivors are quite rare. This outstanding 1966 Bronco U13 Roadster has been treated to an incredible ground up, nut and bolt restoration to exacting original standards. It is finished in light Arcadian blue with optional white rocker panel stripes. The paint and body fit are excellent, with careful attention to detail ensuring it does not appear over-restored.  As correct for the U13, the original fiberglass door opening inserts are fitted and nicely finished. Chrome trim is limited to the bumpers and hubcaps, all of which are excellent. The hubcaps in particular are the very rare original fluted-type as fitted only to the 1966 U13. They are affixed to correct original steel wheels wrapped with correct bias ply whitewall tires. This Bronco’s interior is an exercise in basic accommodations. A pair of front bucket seats is supplemented by a narrow, two person rear bench. The seats are trimmed in silver vinyl upholstery as original, and the floors lined with just a simple rubber mat up front. The remaining interior surfaces are sprayed in the same blue as the exterior. Unique to the U13, the windscreen folds flat for the ultimate open-air experience. Instrumentation is limited to a single multi-function dial that houses the speedometer with temp, fuel and amp gauges surrounding it. Switch gear is limited to controls for the vents, wipers and lights. It is about as basic as you can get, yet retains a charming functionality that is a welcome counterpoint to today’s complex modern vehicles. This Bronco gives you all you need, and nothing more. Power comes from a carefully detailed, original specification 170 cubic-inch inline-six. These legendary engines are known for their toughness and in the lightweight Bronco, deliver respectable performance thanks to the 105 horsepower output. Detailing is as original with correct Ford blue engine paint, black ancillaries, FoMoCo branded hoses, correct tower hose clamps, a period-look Autolite battery, original decals and markings, even the black over-spray in the firewall has been carefully duplicated. The engine is backed by a three speed manual transmission shifted on the column, and a standard Dana transfer case distributes power to all four wheels when needed. This rare and endearing Bronco U13 Roadster is about as basic a vehicle as one could imagine in 1966. We love the basic, no-nonsense appeal and simple yet attractive styling. So many Broncos have been modified beyond recognition, making this pure and factory-correct example a welcome and rare sight. The quality of the restoration is outstanding, and it is ready for its next keeper to relish in its charming simplicity.

    Last update: 10 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1959 Fiat 600 Viotti Coupe

    $39,500(£30,533.50)

    The Fiat 600 was first introduced in 1955 as an Italian answer to the hugely successful VW Beetle and as a follow up to Fiat’s own beloved Topolino. The 600 was designed by the brilliant engineer Dante Giacosa, whose extensive portfolio includes the Fiat Topolino, 508, Cisitalia D46 and Cisitalia 202. With the Fiat 600, he chose a rear-engine/rear-drive layout inspired by the Beetle, though unlike the VW, Fiat fitted an inline-four-cylinder engine with water cooling. The 633 cc unit was mated to a four-speed transaxle, while suspension was by transverse leaf spring up front and independent semi-trailing arms in the rear. Four wheel hydraulic drum brakes were more than adequate to slow the car from its top speed of 59 mph (later, 767 cc versions reached a thundering 68 mph). The Seicento was a huge success for Fiat, setting sales records for the company, selling over a million examples in six years. The platform proved very versatile, with tuners such as Abarth, and various coachbuilders producing a wide variety of sporting and luxury bodies to fit the humble underpinnings. One such coachbuilder, Viotti, had a long-standing relationship with Fiat by the time the 600 was released. Carrozzeria Viotti SpA had been contracted by Fiat to build a large number of special bodies for the Balilla. Between 1933 and 1939, several thousand 508A, 508B and 508C chassis were equipped with high quality Viotti bodies. The great Pietro Frua joined as chief stylist from 1957, and, among estate cars and convertibles, the firm produced a handful of 600 Sport coupes with stylish two-seat coupe bodywork as well as deluxe trim 600s such as our featured car. However, like great many coachbuilders of the period, regular production orders gradually slowed and Viotti closed in 1964. This delightful 1959 Fiat 600 Coupe is an extremely rare and wonderfully presented example of just a handful to be upgraded by Carrozzeria Viotti. The Viotti touches lend a degree of elegance to the otherwise basic 600, and the two-tone gray and red color scheme pairs wonderfully with the styling. This car was found in Italy in 2004, imported to the United States shortly thereafter, and treated to an extensive refurbishment in 2005. It was also recently in the care of the renowned Dominick European Car Repair of White Plains, New York and it is said to be a fine driving example. The body is largely a standard 600, presenting in very good order with clean straight panels and good gaps. The gray main body paint is very good quality, highlighted by a red roof, red body-side flash and red wheel centers. Much of the exterior trim is courtesy of Viotti; with the red body flash trimmed in bright alloy, finishing with very cool detail around the side marker. “Fiat 600 Viotti” badges adorn the front fenders and a lovely, intricate faux grille signifies this as a very special model. Chrome bumpers, alloy headlight bezels and marker light plinths are in excellent condition, with only the lower sill trims showing a few minor dings. Plexiglas wind deflectors adorn the doors, presumably a Viotti addition as well. The original wheels are painted in the same two-tone as the body, and adorned with lovely chrome FIAT hub caps. Period correct Pirelli crossplys are in good order and give this little 600 just the right stance. The stylish cabin was reworked by Viotti with flashy upholstery patterns and a more deluxe, upscale feel to the otherwise basic accommodations. The seats are trimmed in a unique red and white patterned material that is complemented by solid red door cards and quarter panels which present in good order. The floors are lined with mottled red and black rubber mats as original, the colors repeating on the rear parcel shelf. The dash is classic Fiat 600, minimalist yet stylish in its starkness. The original gauge cluster sits behind an original steering wheel, with the only deviation from standard being a large brass St. Christopher medallion. Original switchgear is all in very good working order. Fiat’s 633 c.c. inline four puts out approximately 30 horsepower in standard trim but of course, what this cheeky little Fiat lacks in grunt it makes up for in copious amounts of charm. The lightweight alloy engine is very clean and impressively presented with excellent wiring, labels, plumbing, and high quality finishes on the components. Previous owners have resisted the urge to fit speed parts, thus retaining the original charm. Similarly, the front trunk is tidy and properly detailed with fluted rubber mat, an original style washer bag and a correct spare wheel with leather retaining strap. Overall, this is a very well restored example, combining a quality restoration with the rarity and uniquely attractive Viotti enhancements. We’re sure you’ll be as taken by the charms this delightful, unique and stylish little Fiat 600 as we have been.

    Last update: 11 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1937 Cord 812 Beverly

    $69,500(£53,723.50)

    At first glance, the Cord 810/812 may not seem like a car born of the Great Depression. But during those anxious years, high end manufacturers were struggling to sell extravagant machines, as even the most wealthy of buyers shied away from flaunting their status quite as openly in public. Many manufacturers resorted to developing lower priced models to make up sales. Packard developed the Junior series, Lincoln added the Zephyr line and GM introduced LaSalle to fit between Buick and Cadillac. Even Duesenberg wasn’t immune to the pressure and work was begun on a “baby” Duesenberg that could help pick up sagging sales. Partially through its development, the baby Duesenberg idea was dropped, as it was thought it could tarnish the illustrious brand. But E.L. Cord, the man in charge of Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg, saw great potential in the design and pressed forward to produce it as an all-new model for his revived Cord brand. The Cord L-29 had been out of production for some time, and E.L. saw this as an opportunity to revive the brand that bore his name. Development of the new car forged ahead and the Cord 810/812 was realized by 1936. In spite of its “entry level” roots, technical boundaries were pushed to the limits. Drawing inspiration from the innovative Citroen Traction Avant, Cord designer Gordon Buehrig gave the 810 a semi-monocoque chassis, and it was the first American car with both front wheel drive and independent front suspension. Motivation was courtesy of a Lycoming V8 engine (Lycoming being part of E.L. Cord’s industrial empire) and a solenoid actuated pre-selector transmission. Of course the most distinguishing feature of the 810/812 was its Gordon Buehrig-penned bodywork. The front end featured curvaceous fenders with hidden headlights – a first for any production car. Rather than a traditional radiator shell, the Cord’s radiator was hidden behind a sleek and unorthodox wraparound grille and a uniquely shaped hood, which earned it the nickname “Coffin Nose”. Fully extended doors, no running boards and a sleek, minimally adorned body gave the 810 its distinct appearance. Nearly 80 years later, the Cord 810/812 is still considered to be one of the greatest American car designs in history. As the 810 evolved into the 812 for 1937, some models gained a supercharger, while others remained naturally aspirated. Several body styles were available, from four-door sedans to the open-air phaeton. In fact, several four door versions were available with different designations depending on wheelbase, equipment and body fitments. At the “entry level” lay the Westchester, followed by the Beverly, Custom Beverly and range-topping Berline, the latter two riding on an extended wheelbase. The most distinguishing feature between the Westchester and Beverly was the addition of a “bustle” trunk on the on the Beverly. It also offered more luxurious trappings inside, with additional trim and equipment. The Beverly rode on a 125” wheelbase and shared the same 288 cubic inch Lycoming V8 and sophisticated preselect transmission with the rest of the model range. This fine 1937 Cord 812 Beverly Sedan is an attractive, usable example of one of the most iconic American automobiles of all time. Coming out of recent long-term ownership, it wears an older restoration that has been well-maintained and presents in very good order, showing some light patina in areas, remaining mechanically and cosmetically very sound. It is finished in Palm Beach Tan, with very good paintwork applied over straight and properly aligned panels with excellent, consistent gaps. During a time when cars were defined by their prominent chrome radiator shells and trim, Gordon Buehrig eschewed the flash in favor of a subtle, measured design with limited chrome adornment. That said, bumpers, wheel covers and door handles provided some subtle flash, all of which appear in very good order on this example. The bumpers, wearing original overriders, are straight and tidy with good quality plating and detail. A pair of period-correct Cord fog lamps is fitted to the front apron and the original polished stone guards remain in good order on the rear fenders. The interior presents in very good order, again, well detailed and tidy though showing some patina from use since the restoration was completed. Plum-colored upholstery piped in off white complements the Palm Beach Tan body color quite well. The seats, door panels and headlining remain in very good condition with quality trim accented with very good chrome fittings and hardware. Cord’s signature instrument panel is beautifully presented with its aeronautic-style engine-turned fascia and an array of dials keeping the driver informed of underhood matters. A very cool period Motorola heater is fitted, presumably from new. The 288 cubic inch Lycoming V8 engine and undercarriage are tidy, appearing sorted and well-maintained. The specification and condition of this 812 Beverly should lend it very well to touring, and thanks to the Cord 810/812’s recognition as a CCCA Full Classic, it is eligible for CARavan touring and is well suited to regular enjoyment. The Cord 812 is an icon of American design and this is a good quality, usable example that has benefitted from long term ownership and care.

    Last update: 13 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1948 Daimler DE36 Drophead

    $795,000(£614,535)

    Daimler’s flagship DE series debuted in 1946 as their largest and most expensive car on offer. The chassis was a fairly conventional design with x-bracing and independent front suspension; Hotchkiss drive rear axle, and Girling hydro-mechanical brakes. Two versions were available, the 138-inch wheelbase DE27 which was powered by the Daimler Twenty Seven inline-six cylinder engine (named such for its taxable horsepower rating), or the range-topping DE36 which featured a grand 147-inch wheelbase and was powered by a 5.4 liter inline-eight cylinder  engine. The Thirty Six was essentially Britain’s last straight eight (Rolls Royce did use one in the "heads of state only" Phantom IV, but only eighteen were ever produced). It is a marvelously smooth, overhead valve unit with nine main bearings and a 150 horsepower output. Every bit of that power was needed to pull along the large and opulent bodies that were fitted to the DE36 chassis. Just 205 examples of the Thirty Six were built between 1946 and 1953, with a great many finding favor with the Royal Families of Afghanistan, the Netherlands, Saudi Arabia, Thailand as well as at home in England. At the time the DE36 was built, Daimler counted Hooper & Co. Coachbuilders among its subsidiaries. Hooper had a long tradition of supplying coaches and motor bodies for the British Royal Family and was considered to be a purveyor of the finest quality bodies available. Hooper would stop at nothing to meet their clients’ wishes. Their long association with Daimler produced some fabulous and memorable motorcars. Hooper’s signature post-war style was fabulously elegant; with long, graceful sweeping lines and exquisite detailing. To promote Daimler and Hooper, BSA Chairman Sir Bernard Docker and his wife Lady Docker (who incidentally was made director of Hooper) commissioned a series of show cars for the annual Earl’s Court Motor Show. A run of six different style “Docker Daimlers” were produced; three on the DE36 chassis, consisting of The Green Goddess of 1947, The Golden Daimler of 1951 and the Blue Clover coupe in 1952. The 1953 Silver Flash was built on a 2 ½ liter Conquest Century chassis, and the final two, Stardust and Golden Zebra, sat atop DK400 chassis. Of all the Docker Daimlers, it is the stunning Green Goddess that attracted the most attention, enough so that it spawned a very short production run – with approximately 7 made. Of those seven originals, four are known to survive, each slightly different from the next, with our featured example built in 1948. This fine example was restored some years ago in Europe, and remains in good order throughout. It is painted in a very attractive burgundy and red combination much like its sister car, and the body is pleasingly well detailed and respectably presented. The original show car earned its name thanks to the metallic jade green paintwork applied to the magnificently sweeping and curvaceous drophead body. Today, all cars are known by this nickname regardless of color. Beyond the fabulous Hooper-designed bodywork, it is the sheer scale of the Green Goddess that really captured the attention of show goers. The wheelbase is a massive 147 inches long, and the body is a full 20 feet in length and 78 inches wide at the front. As a point of reference, the original Land Rover rode on an 80 inch wheelbase. The body was loaded with interesting details and features such as a hydro-electrically operated soft top which disappeared beneath a body-color metal cover. Side windows were electrically operated and headlights were faired-in to the front wings behind Perspex covers with fluted chrome trims that mimicked that of the signature Daimler radiator shell. Rear wheel spats are affixed to sprung hinges and built-in jacks at each corner make for civilized servicing should one encounter a puncture. In spite of the aluminum construction of the body, all of those details add up and the Green Goddess weighs in at over 6,000 pounds. The tan leather interior is equally as magnificent, flamboyant and beautifully styled as the exterior. As the DE36 Green Goddess is wider at the front than the rear, seating is a unique 3+2 arrangement, with large leather chairs up front for three, and two individual seats in the rear. The rear seats are cleverly positioned so passengers have a clear view of the road ahead, and if that isn’t enough, they can be raised, theater-style, to allow rear passengers to see over those in front. The driver is treated to a fabulous view down the impossibly long bonnet and faces a gracefully curved wood dash, peppered with bespoke instruments and ivory-colored switchgear. Speed can be registered in either KM or Miles, a feature that hinted at the cross-continental ability of the big Daimler. A column mounted gear selector controls a Daimler pre-select Fluid-Flywheel transmission for seamless, smooth shifting. Ineffable elegance and breathtaking presence define the Daimler DE36 Green Goddess. Sir Bernard Docker was certainly no wallflower; he very much enjoyed using his very special motorcar, and it must have made quite an impact on the narrow British B-roads! With just four known survivors, the Hooper Green Goddess is undeniably an extremely collectible and very important automobile. For many, it marks the high point for both Daimler and the Hooper & Co. Coachbuilders, an impossibly grand statement in the waning days of the custom coachbuilding era.

    Last update: 12 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1954 Sunbeam Alpine Convertible

    $46,500(£35,944.50)

    The Rootes Group was once a powerhouse of the British motor industry. In the late 1920s, the Rootes brothers, Reginald and William, expanded their distribution businesses with the goal of manufacturing the same products they sell. Rather than start small, they began by buying up a number of well-known British automobile manufacturers, eventually building a large conglomerate that included Humber, Hillman, Singer, Sunbeam, and Talbot as well as Commer and Karrier trucks. Prior to their inclusion in the Rootes Group, Sunbeam and Talbot had independently made upmarket sporting saloons and touring cars. When they came under the umbrella of the Rootes brothers (Sunbeam was acquired from receivership in 1935) the two marques were combined to form Sunbeam-Talbot. Rootes had little use for motorsports; however, rallying was a seen as an ideal proving ground to demonstrate the toughness and reliability of their motorcars. Rallying at the time was less about outright speed and more about robustness and reliability – which suited the Sunbeam-Talbot 90 Saloon quite well indeed. Success in events such as the Tulip Rally and Monte Carlo Rally (with the likes of Stirling Moss,  John Fitch and others as drivers) gave company brass confidence in offering a new sports car. The new car was marketed solely as a Sunbeam – primarily to avoid confusion in the French market where the unrelated Talbot-Lago was still offered. Based largely upon the Sunbeam-Talbot 90 saloon car, the new two seat sports car wore a smartly styled body that was based upon the design of the saloon but freshened (reputedly for American tastes) by Raymond Loewy Studios. The handsome, sweeping body was produced in steel by Rootes’ in-house coachbuilder, Thrupp & Maberly. Although the car was more than a bit over weight when compared to its purpose built rivals such as the Austin-Healey 100 and Triumph TR-2, the 80hp high-compression engine returned respectable performance and it was rugged and reliable enough to handle the stress of rallying. More successes came at the hands of Stirling Moss and others, and the Alpine Sports Roadster served its purpose as a publicity machine quite well. The original Alpine roadster was built for only two years, from 1953 to 1955, with just 1,582 examples produced. The name did not appear again until 1959 when a smaller, lighter and more purposeful Alpine was introduced, based on the Hillman Minx. While the original Sunbeam Alpine was never a road burning sports car, it is certainly a stylish and enjoyable automobile with interesting and colorful competition history. Our featured 1953 Sunbeam Alpine is a good, complete example that has recently come out of long-term storage. It presents in fair condition, with some corrosion evident on the body and floor pans. Importantly, it has not been disassembled and scattered so if a restoration were commissioned, it would be a relatively straightforward undertaking. Despite the corrosion, it is still a good looking car finished in white over a red interior. The paint is average but presentable and the body is fairly straight and appears free of any major crash damage or serious structural deficiencies. The Alpine was notably devoid of most heavy-handed bright exterior trim and mouldings (even exterior door handles were left off) and the result is a smooth and tidy look. What chrome there is on the grille and bumpers is in fair order; straight and with minimal pitting in the plating. The red interior is also in good order, and can likely be freshened up and enjoyed as is, or restored as the next owner sees fit. There is a black vinyl top in good condition and the frame is intact and in good order. Over the years, many owners have modified their Alpines in search of more horsepower (rumor has it that a 289 fits!) with sometimes dubious results. Thankfully, this example remains stock and original. The engine is mated to a manual transmission with column shift.  The car will require a full mechanical recommissioning before hitting the road. This Sunbeam Alpine is a good candidate for restoration or conversion into a period rally car. Rare and attractive, it is an interesting example of what Brits believed Americans desired in a sporting car, and the model brings additional cachet of period competition success at the hands of some legendary drivers.

    Last update: 19 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1963 Studebaker Avanti R2 Coupe

    $73,500(£56,815.50)

    In the early 1960s, Studebaker, at more than 100 years old was the longest surviving nameplate in the automotive industry. The Studebaker Brothers Manufacturing Company had been formed in 1852 as a wagon and coach builder, gaining a reputation for affordable, reliable products. They went on to become one of the precious few American coach makers to successfully transition to automobile production at the turn of the century. An early partnership with E-M-F had Studebaker selling E-M-F automobiles in their dealer network. But quality issues led to Studebaker taking over that firm’s automobile line and the rest, as they say, is history. Through the years, Studebaker remained staunchly independent in the face of competition from GM, Ford and Chrysler. They produced many a great car, and particularly in the post-war era, were not afraid to take some daring stylistic risks. Yet as the 1940s rolled into the 1950s, Studebaker began to struggle financially and their product line became more and more staid and dated and they lacked the funding to fully develop new products at the same pace as GM and Ford. In the early 60s, new company president Sherwood Egbert saw the runaway success of the Ford Thunderbird and Chevrolet Corvette and realized he needed a “personal car” of his own; a sporty Grand Touring coupe with four full seats and healthy performance. Just 37 days into his tenure as the top man at Studebaker, Egbert sketched out a concept whilst on a flight from Chicago, handed it to his team and demanded quick action. Given just 40 days to work up a design, chief stylist on the project Raymond Loewy and his team (comprised of Tom Kellogg, Bob Andrews, and John Ebstein) worked 16 hours a day from a rented Palm Springs ranch home, and penned a sleek and ultra-modern body to sit atop a somewhat antiquated Lark Daytona platform, reworked by engineer Eugene Hardig to resemble a sporting car. Given the complexity and subtlety of the Avanti’s curves, fiberglass was chosen as the most cost effective material to build the bodywork. Early production woes with the body supplier meant delays and buyers grew impatient. Although production of the Avanti lasted only two years, with fewer than 5,000 examples built, it has rightly earned its place as a stylistic icon; one of the greatest designs of the era, and a significant piece of both Studebaker and American automotive history. This handsome 1963 Avanti R2 (63R-1049) comes to us via the collection of a noted Avanti enthusiast and it has been restored to a very high standard. It is presented in original specification, restored to the build sheet with an original, numbers-matching supercharged 289 cubic inch V8 and four-speed manual gearbox. Very few Avantis are restored to such a level, making this one of the best of the breed and one of the finest we’ve had the pleasure to offer. It is exceptionally well-documented with a full complement of original paperwork that includes, rather remarkably, the original factory assembly notes and quality-control check lists and build sheets. The car was found in the 1990s in need of restoration by noted champion of the Avanti, Jim Bunting. Mr. Bunting had 1049 restored to exacting standards by Jim Sinclair of Pennsylvania, a respected expert craftsman. The car then passed to a fellow enthusiast who carefully maintained the car, using it sparingly. In 2016 it was freshened by Grand Prix Concours using NOS trim and assorted parts, bringing the car to a factory-fresh standard. The fiberglass body is finished in Avanti White (63S91) as original with deep gloss and fine detailing. Panels are straight, with crisp definition and very consistent gaps. Chrome trim is notably sparse on an Avanti, but the bumpers, headlamp trims and window trims are excellent and properly fitted. It rides on correct original wheels with proper Avanti wheel covers and whitewall tires. The interior is trimmed in wonderfully lurid orange upholstery with black and orange carpets and a fawn dash as per original, making a dramatic statement against the white body. As with the exterior, the interior is fully detailed to original specification and exceptionally well-presented. Seat upholstery, two-tone orange/white door cards and black/orange loop carpets are in the correct original patterns and materials and the quality of the fitment and restoration work is outstanding. The four-speed shift lever in the console defines this as the most sporting and desirable Avanti, and the dash retains the original comprehensive array of instruments, the original radio and switchgear. The engine bay is dominated by the big R2-specification Paxton supercharger and chrome air cleaner assembly. The addition of the supercharger to the Avanti was convenient for Studebaker, as the company had recently acquired Paxton, and with them, boss Andy Granatelli, who applied his wealth of experience in forced induction to the 289 cubic inch Hawk engine. Again, the detailing on this example is factory correct and beautifully executed. The engine is finished in correct colors, and topped with original chrome valve covers. Ancillaries such as the alternator, brake booster and radiator are presented in correct colors and finishes. The engine shows little use since the restoration was completed and is exceptionally clean and tidy. Disc brakes and a well-sorted chassis make for very respectable handling, and with 290 horsepower and 360 ft lbs of torque, this four-speed Avanti is certainly no slouch. It is a fabulous car to drive, even in modern traffic. Studebaker was on the back foot when they introduced the Avanti, and in many ways their fate had already been sealed. In spite of its compromises as a last-ditch effort to save the struggling independent manufacturer, the Avanti was no less a brilliant piece of design and a worthy competitor in the burgeoning Personal Car marketplace. Raymond Loewy’s masterful team designed a car that is truly timeless, and thanks to this car’s remarkable restoration and highly desirable specification, it is a true collectible worthy of virtually any collection.

    Last update: About 4 Hours Old
    For sale
  • 1932 Nash Ambassador 8 Convertible Sedan

    $99,500(£76,913.50)

    Founded in Kenosha, Wisconsin, Nash Motors Company is perhaps best known for its basic, economical yet quirky products from the post-war era such as the aerodynamically designed Airflyte models, the cheeky Austin-powered Metropolitan and the Rambler economy car. While much is written of the Nash-Kelvinator and American Motors days, the days of Nash as an independent manufacturer are perhaps more interesting. Nash was formed when Charles W. Nash, former president of General Motors, left GM and took over Jeffrey Motor Co. in 1916. While he established himself, production of the Jeffrey continued until 1918 when the first proper Nash was introduced. The six-cylinder, mid-priced car was very well built, albeit relatively conventional. Far nicer than a Chevrolet or Ford, Nash was more on par with the likes of Buick, Auburn and even entry-level Packards in terms of quality. During World War I, the Nash works was heavily occupied with construction of four-wheel-drive trucks used by the US Military, though automobile production continued and sales grew steadily into the next decade. By the middle of the 1920s Nash had become widely respected, particularly in export markets, helped in large part by the smooth and powerful “Special Six” and range-topping “Advanced Six” models. For the 1930 season, Nash’s first eight-cylinder engine was introduced. Two years later, the “Ambassador Eight” became a standalone model range offered in a wide range of body styles. Available on a 133-inch chassis, the prestigious new Ambassadors were powered by Nash’s own 125 hp, 322 cubic inches (5.3 L) overhead valve, twin-ignition straight eight. Even in the face of the Great Depression, Charles Nash’s careful management (and some would say creative accounting), allowed Nash to be the only other American automobile manufacturer aside from GM to turn a profit in 1932. The Ambassadors were lavishly equipped and beautifully constructed, earning them the nickname “the Kenosha Duesenberg”. Thanks in large part to that exceptional quality and understated elegance, a number of royal families around the globe found favor with Nash, including Prince William of Sweden, King Carol II of Romania, and Queen Alexandrine of Denmark. This fine Series 1093 Advanced Eight Convertible Sedan from 1932 is one of just 1,891 Advanced Eight models built in 1932 and is one of an estimated three survivors to wear the highly desirable convertible sedan coachwork. The body, built by Seaman Body Corporation (of whom Nash owned a controlling stake) is quite attractive and could be compared in style, quality and size to a contemporary Auburn. This example was discovered in Arizona in the 1970s by G.J. Woodsworth, a skilled general contractor, car enthusiast and experienced restorer. In spite of the Nash’s derelict state, Mr. Woodsworth immediately recognized it as something special and was able to purchase the car for $1,800. Thankfully, the original twin-ignition, overhead valve inline-eight and the rest of the drivetrain were intact, though some ancillaries and exterior fittings had gone missing. After many years of hunting and collecting parts, Mr. Woodsworth began the arduous task of restoring the car. The body was carefully disassembled and the structural wood was carefully restored or replaced using the white oak and alder as original. Prior to assembly, he took the time to preserve each piece to ensure it would be safe from future rot. The exceptional care and level of detail is still apparent in the restoration, even many years later. He chose a striking color combination of terra-cotta red with cream accents and body lines. The lacquer paint was hand sanded between numerous coats and finished with clear for added durability. It has withstood the test of time well and remains very attractive, the beautiful colors highlighting the elegance of the Seaman-built body. The chrome and exterior fittings remain in very good order and it is well detailed with dual sidemount spares, an integrated trunk, original Nash mascot, and dual Do-Ray driving lamps. The stylish looks are punctuated by a set of wide-whitewall tires and lovely chrome wire wheels. The interior is finished in cream-beige leather, which was also restored by Mr. Woodsworth. He rebuilt the seat frames while his wife stitched new covers. Body-color carpets accent the beige leather and provide a pop of color. While technically a hobby-level restoration, the work is exemplary and certainly comparable to that of a professional shop of the era. The cabin remains in very good condition, having taken on a light patina from use, as the Woodworth family enjoyed the Nash a great deal on the road. The full folding convertible top was carefully reconstructed to ensure proper operation and trimmed in tan Haartz canvas. As with the exterior, the interior is full of fascinating details such as an original radio, marbleized bakelike shift knop and a fantastic art-deco inspired instrument panel. The big, powerful twin-spark straight eight was in remarkably good order as found, needing only light honing on the cylinders to return to top condition. Following a light rebuild, it was carefully detailed to original specification. The presentation remains quite good, though some minor cosmetic wear is apparent in places. It remains a strong runner with no needs to be fully enjoyed. The restoration on this exceedingly rare and fascinating Nash Ambassador Eight has weathered beautifully and the car remains in attractive, well-sorted condition, ready for the next keeper to enjoy the fruits of G.J. “Woody” Woodsworth’s copious labor.

    Last update: 27 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1922 Ford Model T Speedster

    $58,500(£45,220.50)

    For nearly as long as the automobile has existed, owners have been tinkering with them to extract more speed, better handling and reliability. Prior to the advent of mass production, automobiles were generally a luxury item and any customizing was done on a bespoke basis. However, once Ford’s ubiquitous Model T hit the scene, suddenly the market was flooded with affordable automobiles that could be tweaked, modified and adapted to just about any imaginable job. As the Model T’s popularity grew, so did the aftermarket that supplied tools and parts to service it. Fords were converted for use as farm implements, work trucks, saw mills, delivery vans and inevitably, racing cars. Pioneering petrol heads found numerous ways to extract more power, better handling and usability from the omnipresent T. Decades before Colin Chapman “added lightness” to his Austin 7 to make the first Lotus, Model T owners were shedding weight by tossing away heavy factory steel fenders and bodywork and replacing them with lightweight and simplified speedster bodies. As the T evolved, so did the concept of the speedster. Early examples were simply cut down roadsters, while later examples got custom bodies designed to cheat the air and ditch the pounds. Based in Louisville, Kentucky, the Roose Manufacturing Company offered a wide variety of accessories designed to make live with a Model T a bit easier. Their main product offerings were practical items such as insulated hood covers, weather proof coil box covers and convertible tops. However, they did offer a handful of rakish speedster bodies named “Speed King”. In addition to modified bodies, performance improvements could be made to a T with thanks to a burgeoning speed equipment industry. The leaders in the market were none other than the Chevrolet Brothers (Louis and Arthur) who’s highly advanced Frontenac overhead valve cylinder head had proven itself in the “Fronty-Ford” by finishing in 5th place in the 1923 Indianapolis 500 mile race at an official average of 82.58 MPH; a remarkable achievement in the face of much larger and more powerful competition. This fascinating little 1918 Ford Model T is a wonderful period piece, wearing a Roose Mfg Co. Speed King body and accessorized with an array of period speed parts. The all-steel body is very rare and quite interesting, with an unusual custom grille shell up front, sweeping back to a close-coupled cockpit and a sharply tapered tail. The body is in solid, sound condition with heavily patinated white paintwork contributing to the fabulous character. The red chassis and black radiator combine for a wonderfully racy look.  The cockpit is spartan, with just enough room for a driver and ride-along mechanic. This T does have some go to match the show, with a Frontenac cylinder head greatly improving breathing, and an add-on water pump fitted to help keep things cool at the higher engine speeds allowed by the overhead valve setup. The engine appears in good order, tidy and clean needing little to bring up to full song. We are quite fond of this unusual and charming Model T speedster. It offers real rarity thanks to its period speed equipment and high quality steel body, and it presents with a certain charming honesty that encourages enthusiastic use, whether around the block or around a vintage race paddock. It is sound and complete, and we could even see it prepared for vintage rallies – so long as the crew doesn’t mind the weather! Whatever the use, this is a fascinating piece of early American motor sports history that is sure to charm its next keeper.

    Last update: 28 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1931 Cadillac V12 Convertible Coupe

    $289,500(£223,783.50)

    For most of Cadillac’s early history, The Standard of the World was more than simply a marketing slogan used to sell cars. From its earliest days, the company went to great lengths to live up to that claim by building exceptional quality, highly innovative motorcars. In the 1930s, Cadillac’s entry-level LaSalle as well as standard Cadillac V8 models were selling well, with much-needed cash being added to the coffers. Cadillac decided to throw their hat into the ring among manufacturers around the world who were engaging in a “multi-cylinder” engine war. In 1930 Cadillac shocked the motoring world with introduction of both a V12 and an unprecedented V16 engine. The introduction of these two marvelous engines put manufacturers such Hispano-Suiza, Lagonda, Rolls-Royce and chief cross-town rivals at Packard square in Cadillac’s sights. Both engines were designed simultaneously by Cadillac engineer Owen Nacker, and they shared the same basic layout as well as many common components. The V12’s output was a healthy 135 horsepower, while the V16 put out a full 175 horsepower – a headline grabbing figure for its day. The Model 370 V12 did have its advantages over the V16, being lighter it therefore offered better handling and drivability. The twelve was also significantly cheaper than its sixteen cylinder sibling – starting at $3,795 or about $2,000 less than the ultra-exclusive V16 – the difference almost covering the cost of a new LaSalle! Various custom and semi-custom bodies were available, with the standard cars being among the first projects for GM by the great Harley Earl. Cadillac struck a near perfect balance with the 370A; while the V16 provided the headlines and the ultimate in exclusivity, the V12 Model 370A cost less but was nearly as luxurious, offering nearly the same performance and elegant style. As a result, 5,733 V12 Cadillacs were sold in the 1931 model year, pushing Cadillac closer to achieving their bold claim of becoming The Standard of the World. Wearing highly desirable Convertible Coupe coachwork by Fleetwood atop a 140” wheelbase chassis, this 1931 Cadillac 370A V12 has been treated to a no-expense-spared restoration with absolutely stunning results. It is finished in a gorgeous period-correct color combination of a green main body accented with black body lines and black fenders. The crisp, stylish looks are punctuated with green wheels fitted with polished stainless steel spokes wrapped in proper whitewall tires. Completed within the last five years, the concours-quality restoration is exemplary and remains very fresh both inside and out. Of course, the paintwork is beautiful with fine detailing and beautiful finishes and the extensive exterior brightwork has likewise been restored to a high standard and precisely fitted to the body. Sporty and stylish, the Fleetwood Convertible Coupe body is equipped with a rumble seat, signature stainless radiator stone guard, goddess radiator mascot, dual sidemount spares, and a luggage rack. Included with the sale is a copy of the original build sheet. The beautiful two seat cabin is trimmed in tan leather with properly detailed tan door cards and carpets. Signature 370A trim includes the distinctive engine-turned alloy fascia with wood inserts and wood door caps. As with the exterior, the interior is restored to a high standard and impeccably detailed. Original instruments and switchgear all function as they should and the leather seats still appear very fresh, showing very little use since completion. Occasional passengers are relegated to the rumble seat, which is trimmed in the same beautiful tan leather as the cabin. When compared with the roadster, the Convertible Coupe benefits from additional weather equipment such as a lined folding soft top with exterior landau irons, and roll up side windows. With the added comfort provided by the top and side windows, the convertible coupe is a fabulous choice for touring; sporty yet comfortable and well-suited to all weather conditions. Cadillac’s exquisite 368 cubic inch, L-head V12 engine delivers a healthy 135 horsepower with incredible smoothness. The V12 was nearly as powerful as the V16, yet was also quite a bit lighter over the front axle, making it the driver’s choice among the two. The theme of exceptional quality continues with a restored drivetrain that functions as beautifully as it looks. The V12 shared the V16’s signature ribbed valve covers and black-enamel finishes. In our opinion, this V12 ranks up there with the most beautifully designed engines of all time. Fresh and ready for enjoyment, this remarkable Cadillac 370A has never been shown in its restored state, making it eligible for virtually any major concours in the hands of its next owner. The same care and attention paid to the cosmetics also grace the drivetrain and it returns impeccable road manners and performance. Four wheel brakes, a smooth shifting synchronized transmission and hydraulic shock absorbers make it an absolute delight, while the power and smoothness of the V12 engine allow it to perform in modern road conditions. With exquisite looks and performance to match, this 370A Convertible Coupe is a truly outstanding example, fresh and ready for the concours lawn or the open road alike.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1928 Amilcar CGSS Roadster

    $105,000(£81,165)

    Amilcar was born amid the of the Cyclecar and Vouiturette movements in early 20th century France. Prior to the outbreak of World War I, French motoring enthusiasts created a market for light, affordable performance cars with smallbore engines. Fitting somewhere between a motorcycle and a standard automobile, the Cyclecar was adopted by a multitude of manufacturers. In the years after The Great War, France was eager to regain its standing as a world leader in automobile production, and as the economy struggled to fully recover, the inexpensive cyclecars again proved popular among buyers. Another driving factor for the perpetuation of the tiny cyclecars was the French tax code that greatly favored small cars. The French government even went so far as to provide a specific definition of a Cyclecar: It specified any three or four wheeled vehicle, with one or two seats, weighing no more than 350 kilograms and with an engine that must not exceed 1100c.c. If any of those factors were exceeded, the car was moved into the official Voiturette class. Manufacturers were able to get ever more power out of small engines, and as a result, the 1100c.c. cyclecar and voiturette class became a hotbed for performance motoring, with customers often buying these small cars for weekend competition use. Amilcar’s jewel-like CGS and the sporting CGSS variant gained a reputation as quite the weekend warrior, chocking up hundreds of wins in local and regional smallbore racing around France. Their robust nature and exceptional performance earned the nickname “Poor Man’s Bugatti”. The CGS and CGSS were technically very similar, the second “s” of the later denoting “Surbaisse”, which literally translates as “low profile”. The lowered chassis was the primary difference, though an additional few horsepower were massaged out of the 1074 c.c. sidevalve power plant. The CGS and CGSS formed the basis for much of Amilcar’s success through the late 1920s, in both the showroom and on the racetrack; with perhaps the most famous victory coming in the 1927 Monte Carlo Rally. It proved to be one of the best-selling models in Amilcar’s relatively short history, with approximately 4,700 examples built of both the CGS and CGSS and it remains one of the most recognized and collectible of the road going models. This lovely little 1928 Amilcar CGSS has been very well restored and fitted with a beautiful Grand Sport style body. It is finished in ivory over a green leather interior, with distinct green accents applied to the undersides of the cycle-style wings. The Grand Sport-style two-seat body is beautifully proportioned with an offset cockpit and tapered tail, sitting atop a petite 90” wheelbase. It does possess a certain quality of a miniature Bugatti, thanks to the pure and purposeful style and minimal adornment. The body is built a high quality standard and the off-white paint very well presented. Amilcar’s signature nickle radiator shell is in excellent condition, flanked by headlights mounted on delicate fender braces. The door-less body is features a single side-mounted spare wheel, Weather equipment is limited to a delicate cut-down windscreen and the quality of clothing worn by the occupants. The simple, functional cockpit is trimmed in green leather and the dash is finished in a very cool diamond-patter engine-turned alloy. It is well equipped with an array of period French instrumentation including a fabulous LE NIVEX tachometer and Sifam minor instruments. A wood wheel is delightfully worn in and a tactile joy for the driver. Beyond controls and instruments, the cockpit is relatively unadorned, yet pleasingly detailed. Without doors or windows, it is a case study of pure functional simplicity. Amilcar’s wonderful 1,074 c.c. side-valve engine features an alloy head and was rated at 35hp in the slightly uprated CGSS tune. Our example is pleasingly detailed and very nicely presented, and the engine is mated to the very rare and desirable four-speed transmission. Given the featherweight body and chassis, performance is surprisingly brisk, combined with nimble, deft handling. This lovely little Voiturette is simply a delight to behold and to steer. Subtle modifications have been made for drivability, such as an enlarged foot box to accommodate taller drivers. It can be readily enjoyed as presented, having been recently shown at Amelia Island and Lime Rock Park’s diverse and prestigious Sunday in the Park Concours, where it won the 2016 prize for best French car. No mere trailer-queen, it has even made an appearance at the VSCCA’s legendary Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix. While it’s early history has been lost to time, this beautiful, delightful Amilcar is an outstanding example from this storied and highly desirable marque.  A fabulous pre-war sporting car, its beautiful style, quality restoration and joyful road manners make it suitable for a wide variety of events.

    Last update: 18 Days Old
    For sale
  • 1920 Stutz Bearcat

    $475,000(£367,175)

    As the son of a farmer, Harry C. Stutz grew up tinkering with mechanical objects. Prior to the turn of the twentieth century, young Stutz was repairing and improving implements on his family farm and he soon became enthralled with the burgeoning world of motorized transport. He left home to pursue an engineering education, and in 1897, built his first motorcar, following that with a second that was powered by an engine of his own design and manufacture! He quickly earned a stellar reputation for his talents and was known as a driven, creative, innovator. Stutz landed a job with the American Motor Car Company where he was charged with designing an engine for their most famous model, the Underslung. After a brief spell with American, Harry Stutz formed his own company called “Ideal Motor Car Company” based in Indianapolis, Indiana. The first Stutz automobile, the Model A, which served as the basis for the Bearcat, was built in just five weeks in 1911, and delivered across town to compete in the inaugural Indianapolis 500 Mile Race. An 11th place finish with Gil Anderson behind the wheel earned the slogan: “The Car That Made Good in a Day.” Later that summer, manufacture of the Stutz Model A, a road-going duplicate of the proven Indy racer, began in earnest. Stutz was keen to take advantage of marketing opportunities, with a Stutz Bearcat roadster serving as the pace car at the 1912 Indianapolis 500. The Ideal Motor Car Company was reorganized into the Stutz Motor Company and the Model A evolved into the Bearcat for 1912. The first series Bearcat was a pared down racer-for-the-road with a light body, monocle windscreen and a pair of bucket seats; in the same ilk as its fierce competitor, the Mercer Raceabout. Early cars were powered by a massive T-Head four-cylinder engine supplied by Wisconsin Engines, but later cars received an advanced four cylinder, sixteen valve engine of Stutz’s own design. This new 360 cubic inch engine, which was derived from that of the White Squadron racers, necessitated an all new chassis to cope with the additional power. The Bearcat’s redesigned chassis was stronger than before, yet still relatively light and quite short at just 120”. Clothing the new framework and engine was an updated, stylish body that was more in keeping with the times. Still overtly sporty, with a single rear mounted spare and no doors, Stutz now offered the Bearcat with reasonable weather equipment and full road trim. The Bearcat came to define Stutz as a brand as well as a car that personified “The Roaring Twenties”, evoking images of young men in raccoon coats flying Ivy League pennants on their prized sports cars. Today they remain massively collectible as few survived the flogging they often received at the hands of their enthusiastic, blue-blooded young owners. This exceptional 1920 Stutz Bearcat Series H has been treated to a very high quality restoration and presents in outstanding order. It wears a fabulous color scheme of a dark red main body over black fenders highlighted by a bright red chassis and elephant gray Buffalo wire wheels. The 2003 restoration has been well documented with many photos included. It has since been meticulously maintained and remains in beautiful order. Included documents show it was once owned by a General Motors executive and also spent a great deal of time in the hands of Raymond Katzell, author of the definitive marque reference, “The Splendid Stutz”. The paint work is excellent with very straight panels and very high quality fit and finish. Originally, the Bearcat was unadorned with heavy brightwork and this example is correctly presented with a black painted radiator shell, polished nickel rings and black-painted barrels on the Stutz headlamps, and a period correct nickel spot lamp on the driver’s side. A Stutz-branded Moto Meter sits atop the radiator and the gated shifter and handbrake lever are mounted outside the cockpit for the ultimate road-racer feel. The cozy two-place cockpit is trimmed in black leather which remains in excellent order. Ingress and egress are via the passenger side running board and a secondary step plate, which cleverly features an embossed leather pad to protect the body from scuffs when climbing aboard. Compared to earlier models, the series H did have reasonable weather equipment with a full width windscreen and a folding canvas top, and the fitment is exemplary on this Bearcat. Impressive detailing and presentation continues under the bonnet. Stutz’s fabulous 360 cubic inch, 16-valve four-cylinder produces 83 horsepower and is undoubtedly the centerpiece of this wonderful automobile. Our fine example is correctly finished with a green cylinder block, bare alloy crankcase and plenty of beautifully polished brass and alloy. It presents in very good condition, runs beautifully, and while it is showing some signs of use since the restoration was completed, it remains very attractive. The chassis and undercarriage are similarly detailed, showing in beautiful condition, reflective of the quality of restoration and careful use this Bearcat has received since. Harry C. Stutz is one of the great automotive pioneers who should be considered among the greats alongside Ettore Bugatti, Harry Miller and the Duesenberg Brothers. His passion was reflected in the exquisite quality and performance of the cars that bore his name. This outstanding example of one of the most desirable models in Stutz history remains in showable condition, and would certainly be an outstanding touring companion given its performance and gorgeous presentation.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1968 Riley Elf Jolly

    $57,500(£44,447.50)

    The beach car phenomenon of the late 1950s is often credited to Gianni Agnelli, the playboy grandson of Fiat founder Giovanni Agnelli. While it was Agnelli who made it popular, the idea is said to have originated with Ghia’s Gigi Segre. Whilst on holiday, Segre noticed big taxis lumbering around the streets of the island of Capri. He thought something more whimsical and stylish would add a dose of fun and practicality to island life. He sketched out a solution that started with a Fiat Cinquecento, which Ghia then modified for summer duty by first reinforcing the body and lopping off the roof. But no mere convertible, the car was further modified by replacing the doors with a cut-down, step through body sides. Wicker seats were installed should occupants be fresh from a swim in the Mediterranean and a whimsical surrey top provided shade. Combined with the original styling of the tiny Fiat, the “Jolly” beach car was a fun and adorable exercise. It did not find much favor with buyers at first, however. But such was the influence of the young Gianni Agnelli, that when a newspaper published a photo of him in his new Fiat Jolly on the Italian Riviera, the public went mad and Jollys began to sell, as suddenly anybody who was somebody needed to be seen driving one of Ghia’s delightful little buggies. Ghia offered a variety of versions mainly built on the Fiat 500 and 600 chassis. There was also a Jolly built on the Renault 4CV (probably to appease French Riviera dwellers) and even the Fiat Multipla. Other coachbuilders and manufacturers got the bug and tried their hands at the cheeky little beach cars, with variations popping up using the Austin Mini and Volkswagen Beetle as their base. VW even went so far as to offer the factory-produced Type 181 “Thing” in the late 1960s. Countless other specials and one-offs have been inspired by the Jolly over the years as the genre continues to find favor with collectors for their charming, low key nature. This cheeky little creation started life as a standard Riley Elf, which in itself was essentially a more luxurious, booted version of the Austin Mini. It has been given the full Jolly treatment with welded up and cut-down doors and the roof and side windows removed and cast aside for sunshine-only duty. The quality of the conversion is top rate, and the car could easily be mistaken for a coachbuilt example. The paint is excellent, with fine quality finishing and detailing. It rides on a set of Minilite-style alloys with low-profile tires. The body has been de-bumpered but retains the distinct Riley radiator grille, and very good quality chrome mirrors and headlamp rings. The interior features a very nicely finished wood dash, a quality wood-rimmed Mountney steering wheel and matching custom wood rails which trim out the cockpit. Front and rear seats have been recovered in stripe pattern marine-quality canvas to hold up to the rigors of sun exposure and beach duty, while the floors are line with natural coco-fiber floor mats. The interior is quite nicely detailed and well executed with chrome hardware and handy map pockets built into the side panels. It even includes a surf board that has been finished to match the interior. It is mechanically very strong and is “turn-key” and ready for enjoyment. Restoration and service receipts are included, which show a very recent engine rebuild. The engine compartment is very clean and well-presented. Simple, cheeky and fun, this Elf presents in excellent condition, having been part of a special exhibition of beach cars at the 2015 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance. It is a high quality conversion that brilliantly captures the essence of the Jolly.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1970 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 Sedan

    $139,500(£107,833.50)

    Some of the greatest enthusiast cars in history have come from the fruitful minds of engineers forced to work in secret to avoid the swinging axe of the bean-counters or judgmental frowns of pragmatic executives. This was the case with the Mercedes-Benz 300 SEL 6.3 and its creator, Erich Waxenberger. In the mid-1960s, the Mercedes-Benz lineup was very conservative. Even the SL sports car was limited to six cylinders and heavily biased toward automatic transmissions and luxury touring. Mercedes’ saloon car lineup was even more staid, with the W108 and its air-suspended sibling, the W109, topping out with a 3.0 liter, Bosch-injected inline six. Of course, these were wonderful cars built with exceptional attention to detail – they just lacked the performance that Waxenberger desired. Working in secret and after hours, a small team led by Herr Waxenberger applied the classic American pony-car edict– “there’s no replacement for displacement” to the mid-sized W109, shoehorning in the all-alloy, 6.3 liter M100 V8 (lifted from the 600 grosser limousine). They handed the prototype over to long-time Mercedes-Benz executive, Rudi Ulehhaut who was seen as their best ally in getting this new project off the ground. Ulenhaut was so shocked by the turn of speed that it is said he immediately pulled over and opened the hood in disbelief at how Waxenberger and his team managed to fit such a beast of an engine in there. Give the M100’s output of 300hp and 434 ft-lbs of torque, it is easy to see how he was caught off guard! The project was green-lighted by Ulenhaut, with the unveiling scheduled for Geneva in 1968. The SEL 6.3 was a relative success with 6,500 examples built between 1968 and 1972. It also spawned smaller V8 engine models as well as a long tradition of big-engined, Mercedes saloon cars that continues to this day with the in-house AMG program. No car of its day could carry five passengers at such speed, and the handsome but conservative styling makes the “6.3” not only the ultimate Q-car, but one of the best all-out performance cars of the era. Our featured example, a 1970 300 SEL 6.3, comes to us via a passionate and meticulous owner who cared deeply for the car while in his possession. In the same hands for the last 20 years, the prior owner purchased this car from the 2nd owner to use as a daily driver. He used the car regularly for many years, maintaining it carefully via specialists. As the duties of daily use showed their marks, he embarked on an extensive multi-year restoration in the early 2000s. In the process, corrosion was addressed using factory panels, the M100 engine was serviced with new timing chains, refreshed cooling system and other ancillaries, and the air suspension fully rebuilt. The quality of the restoration is exceptional, especially considering the costs involved in such a project. The bodywork is incredibly straight with outstanding panel fit and shut lines. The factory-correct and original color of 904G Midnight Blue Glasurit single-stage paint is beautifully laid down with a deep gloss and no flaws to speak of.  The chrome bumpers, grille and exterior trim were restored to factory quality and the headlights converted to the more attractive European units. Factory “Bundt” alloys were restored and now wear proper Michelin rubber. The quality and detail of the restoration continue to impress via the gorgeous interior. The front and rear seats were restored using parchment leather in correct materials and patterns, and a full set of complementary blue carpets set off the cabin beautifully. The wood trim was restored to concours standards, and the owner added wood A-pillar trim from a pre-1970 model as a subtle aesthetic upgrade. A rebuilt Becker radio keeps the dash looking period correct and all instruments, switches and even the air conditioning work as they should. Nearly $100,000 was spent ensuring this car was returned to its former glory, all of which has been extensively documented in an included history file. The M100 engine is legendary for its longevity and the work performed ensured this car will have a solid future. The air suspension was serviced and rebuilt as needed, and the car sits properly, without losing air pressure over time. Even the differential and rear axle has been completely rebuilt at great expense using original MB parts. Since the restoration, the owner ran the car and used it carefully but regularly to keep every system working as it should. He reported to us that a run from Eastern Pennsylvania to St. Louis, MO for the M100 owner’s club was relaxed and 100% trouble free. This 6.3 has also been shown at several events including the Greenwich Concours and the Deutsche Classic where it earned multiple awards.  Few of these wonderful cars have been as cherished and well-maintained as this example. Considering the performance, quality and the outstanding restoration, this 300 SEL 6.3 represents an exceptional value that is a match for its exceptional performance.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1930 Cord L29 Convertible Sedan

    $215,000(£166,195)

    In the mid-1920s, Auburn Automobile Company was struggling with poor sales and a humdrum product offering. They enlisted the help of entrepreneur and successful Auburn salesman E.L. Cord to help bail them out of trouble. Auburn was stuck with a large amount of unsold inventory, and their cars were considered boring by the general public. E.L. Cord came up with a simple but effective plan of repainting the unsold cars in bright colors to help gain attention. To the surprise of many, his plan worked incredibly well. As a result of his success, he was offered a position within the company. But Cord was an extremely ambitious and aggressive business man, and a job within the company simply wasn’t enough for him. By 1928 he was in complete control of Auburn, having saved it from certain bankruptcy. At that time he was also well on his way to building a massive manufacturing empire that included Auburn, Lycoming Engines, Checker Cab, Duesenberg, Stinson Aircraft and New York Shipbuilders, among others. Having re-energized Auburn as a successful car builder, he decided to build a car with his own name on it – one that would compete with the likes of Lincoln, Packard and Stutz for luxury car honors. In typical E.L. Cord fashion, he eschewed tradition and specified a car that was as innovative as it was beautiful. In 1929 the L-29 appeared as a sleek, attractive and impossibly low slung machine with front wheel drive and a De Dion front axle, designed by an ex-Miller Indy Car engineer who spearheaded the project. The L-29 was significant as it was the very first front wheel drive American car, beating the lesser known Ruxton to the market by a few months. The L-29 shared the 301 cubic inch Lycoming straight eight with Auburn, but with the engine reversed in the chassis, driving through a three-speed transmission at the front. Performance was adequate, and thanks to the low center of gravity, handling was impressive. The L-29 was available with various factory bodies, though many were custom bodied by some of the finest coachbuilders of the time. Only 5,014 L29s were built between 1929 and 1932, as the Great Depression took hold and luxury automobiles suffered the consequences. This lovely Cord L-29 Convertible Sedan is presented in a striking combination of cream with medium blue accents with a fabulous effect. The older restoration still presents very well with good quality paintwork, nice detailing and finish work. The paint shows very well, revealing only minor signs of use, still remaining in fine enough order to show. Blue accents are particularly endearing, featuring as flashes on the body swage lines, running boards and chassis. The famous low-slung lines of the L-29 are further enhanced by the gorgeous chrome wire wheels with blue accented wheel rims. Dual side mount spares are fitted with mirrors and the chrome bumpers and exterior brightwork all present in very fine condition. A period trunk in good condition sits on the trunk rack, wearing a tan canvas cover that matches the convertible top. The tan top remains in very good condition, with the frame in good order and working well. The interior is trimmed in lovely tan leather and it is in very good condition, with only some light patina from use since the restoration was completed. L-29s have a glorious art-deco dash design, and this example has been recently freshened to enhance the cosmetics. Original instrumentation and steering wheel are in very good condition. The 301 cubic inch Lycoming inline-eight cylinder engine is the same as an Auburn 8-32, though cleverly turned 180 degrees for installation in the front drive L-29. It is nicely detailed and has been recently treated to a thorough cleaning. Correct wiring, fittings and clamps point to a very high quality restoration and care since completion. With its magnificent lines and ground breaking front-drive layout, the Cord L-29 remains one of the most desirable classics of all time. It is of course welcome at virtually any CCCA, AACA or similar road event. The high quality restoration has been very well maintained and the car remains very much in showable condition. Fabulous colors and detailing just add to the appeal of this handsome and highly desirable Cord L-29.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1960 Rolls-Royce Phantom V By Park Ward Limousine

    $109,500(£84,643.50)

    Rolls-Royce had experienced a major shift of philosophy in the post-war years. The Silver Dawn was the first car from Crewe to wear a standard factory-supplied body, which signaled the beginning of the end of the British coachbuilding industry. Although the custom body segment was dwindling, there was still enough demand to support continued production of the Silver Wraith through 1959, as well as the opulent Phantom IV; a straight-eight cylinder powered behemoth reserved for royalty. Both of these high-end models were supplied by Rolls-Royce as chassis only and were bodied by the best coachbuilders of the era. The arrival of the Silver Cloud in 1955 represented a further shift toward factory supplied bodies. The Cloud was a beautiful, modern motorcar that cost much less than bare chassis plus custom body. It ultimately replaced both the Silver Dawn and the Wraith. The prestigious Phantom IV was in production from 1950-1956, but only seventeen cars were ever completed and the roots of its chassis were firmly planted in the pre-war era. As luxurious, stylish and fine driving as the Silver Cloud was, there was now a distinct void at the very top of the market. Following a three year absence, the Phantom name returned to the Rolls-Royce lineup in 1959, with the arrival of the Phantom V. The chassis was based upon that of the V8 powered Silver Cloud II, though on a more grand scale thanks to an additional two feet added to the wheelbase. By the time the Phantom V was announced, many of England’s best coachbuilders had closed or were on the brink of closure, so the Phantom V provided welcome boost in business, proving to be a magnificent base on which they could practice their craft. Utilizing many standard components from the Cloud series allowed for a more generous production number, with 516 examples produced from 1959 through 1968 with a wide variety of body styles from the likes of James Young, Park Ward, and H.J. Mulliner. The famous and infamous alike have owned Phantom Vs, including the British Royal family, John Lennon, The Shah of Iran and the notorious Imelda Marcos. Our featured example, 5AS69, is a 1960 model from the first series of Phantom V production. It wears an elegant and handsome Park Ward limousine body originally commissioned for the London High Commissioner for Nigeria. It presents in lovely condition with a very good quality cosmetic restoration that has been extremely well maintained since its completion. Classic Mason’s Black paintwork is laid down over alloy straight panels with excellent alignment and fit.  Getting such a large car to appear so straight in a single-tone black paint scheme is no easy task and is a testament to the quality and care given to the restoration. A single coach line in gold accents the paintwork, which is repeated on the wheel covers as per original. Chrome adornment is limited to bumpers, light trims, a subtle waist strip and of course, the prominent Rolls Royce radiator shell. A radiator-mounted flag holder hints at this car’s period diplomatic duties.  All of the brightwork is presented in very good order, with deep, clear reflections and no corrosion to speak of. The interior is wonderfully presented, with a black driver’s compartment contrasting a cream beige passenger compartment, separated by a powered divider. The chauffeur’s compartment is beautifully trimmed, showing some light yet attractive creasing on the leather. Black Wilton carpets are in excellent order and the gorgeous woodwork provides a visual lift to the otherwise austere and businesslike driver’s office. An under-dash A/C unit keeps the driver and front passenger comfortable, while all original instruments and switchgear present in excellent order. The rear compartment is a drastic contrast to the front, with a light and airy feeling courtesy of the cream beige Connolly hides, light Wilton rugs, and plenty of glass. Integrated into the divider is a beautifully finished wood bar, an originally-fitted option which includes a pair of crystal decanters. Flanking the bar is a pair of jump seats trimmed in leather and vents for the rear-mounted air conditioning system. Door cards are in excellent order, with beautiful banded-wood caps surrounding the cabin. Rear passengers are whisked along in opulence, with gorgeous tan leather chairs, individual cigarette lighters, carpeted foot rests and a separate set of controls for the rear air conditioning system. The engine (#PV34A) presents in tidy order with a few modern upgrades for the sake of reliable operation. Largely correct finishes adorn the rocker covers, ancillaries and firewall. It is reported to be an outstanding driver, with its previous owner using the car regularly for shows and events. It rides on a set of Michelin X radial tires, a widely accepted modern alternative to the original crossply tires, well suited to the performance characteristics of this large limousine. The Phantom V and its sibling, the Phantom VI, marked the end of the long-running tradition of coachbuilt limousines from Rolls-Royce. These grand motorcars competed with the likes of the Mercedes-Benz 600 for superiority among royalty, captains of industry and heads of state. The impressive quality of this example is certain to appeal to an enthusiast who chooses to drive rather than be driven, and it remains very much in showable condition thanks to the high quality restoration and careful maintenance.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1931 Detroit Electric Model 97 Coupe

    $128,500(£99,330.50)

    Detroit Electric is somewhat of an anomaly compared to other companies who adopted “alternative fuels”.  The pioneering days of the automobile industry were awash with creative ideas for propulsion beyond just the internal combustion petrol engine. Steam and Electric were popular alternatives before the petroleum infrastructure was fully established. Electrics in particular became popular among wealthy urban women, as they were clean, silent and perfectly suited for the short distances traveled in the city. In the days before Cadillac’s adoption of the Delco System Self-Starter, electrics also had the distinct advantage with no difficult and dangerous starting procedure which, if done improperly could cause serious injury. Even when executed properly, it was not considered particularly lady-like to be yanking on a starter handle. While electrics didn’t particularly flourish in the face of the rapidly developing petrol-engined cars, a reasonably steady market existed to support a few manufacturers. Detroit-Electric stands out as by far one of the most successful and longest-surviving of them all, remaining in production from 1907 through 1939. As steam and electric cars dropped by the wayside, Detroit Electric somehow managed to survive, producing simple, but well-constructed cars that seemed well past their expiry date. Their best year, 1914, saw a production of 4669 cars – putting them decidedly in a niche market when compared to the likes of Ford. But the company persisted even as the fondness for electric cars began to wane after 1916, a time when most production automobiles were offered with electric starters. Styling upgrades such as the addition of “false fronts” kept them up with current trends and even an open speedster proved popular with buyers. Production dropped steadily, even after prices were reduced from a peak of $4000 in 1921. But Detroit Electric persisted, offering buyers the option of conventional bodies supplied by Dodge or Willys-Overland to sit atop their chassis from 1930 onward. Remarkably, the firm soldiered on, still offering the classic (though it was considered positively archaic at the time) “parlor on wheels” body style with tiller steering through the end of production – which some believe persisted until as late as 1941. An estimated 35,000 Detroit Electrics were built over the company’s 35 years, and they remain popular with collectors and enthusiasts. This 1931 Model 97 Coupe is one such later model from Detroit Electric. This example is one of the finest we’ve had the pleasure to offer, having been restored to concours standards by an experienced marque specialist. The elegant dark blue over black paintwork is beautifully finished and the body straight and finely detailed. According to historian Beverly Rae Kimes, just 131 Detroit Electric cars were built in 1931, making this a very rare motorcar, indeed. While there is little to differentiate this later model from those in the teens, there are a few subtle differences. Most notable clues are the smaller, 18-inch wire wheels as well as the chrome headlights and bumpers. The wire wheels are finished in black with lovely chrome beauty rings and center caps and blackwall tires lend an understated appearance to the exterior. Unique cowl lights and a “SLO” brake light add to the period charm and it wears the originally equipped trunk rack – presumably to hold the shopping since long trips were not exactly practical for the time. To the uninitiated, the unconventional cabin layout can be quite surprising. Most notable is the lack of a traditional steering wheel and pedal arrangement. With the feeling of a lounge on wheels, the driver operates the car via a tiller whilst sat far back on the main bench seat. A flower vase and swiveling, jump seat up front continues the casual salon-like feel as one can easily imagine a trio of socialites using this Detroit in period, chatting away whilst on a shopping run in the city. Like the exterior, the interior is nicely finished to a very high standard. Patterned cloth upholstery on the seats is complemented by tan fabric on the door cards and interior panels. The cabin is simple, yet elegant and inviting, with minimal adornment and basic instrumentation to monitor speed and battery output. Modern AGM batteries replace the original lead-acid type. The modern batteries are of course more powerful and lighter than the originals, lending improved performance and range. The quality of the restoration impresses, with scant few imperfections to detract from the fine presentation. We are quite pleased to offer this outstanding example, a rare survivor from the later days of Detroit Electric, a fascinating footnote in American automobile history that has returned to relevance considering the newfound attention paid to alternative fuels.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1935 Cadillac Model 355-D Sedan

    $48,500(£37,490.50)

    Cadillac’s venerable model 355 was heavily reworked for the 1934/35 model year. Starting from the ground up with an all new chassis that featured so-called “Knee Action” independent front suspension, the 355-D received a fresh new look thanks to totally reworked styling. The chassis was now fully concealed beneath the curvaceous new body and the car elegantly proportioned with a long hood and flowing, voluptuous fenders. This was clearly in response to Packard’s gorgeous 1934 models and evidence of automobile styling creeping ever closer to fully enveloped, streamlined bodies. In terms of the powertrain, the 355D was essentially the same as its predecessors, still powered by the smooth and powerful V8 engine that now produced 130hp at 3400 rpm. 1935 marked the last year for the long-running V8 engines that formed their roots back in 1927. A variety of body styles by Fisher and Fleetwood meant plenty of options for buyers and sales of the 355D were strong, with over 8,300 cars sold between 1934 and 1935. The story of this fabulous Fleetwood-bodied Cadillac Town Sedan begins on November 12, 1934. This fine motorcar was originally invoiced to Alvan T. Fuller’s Cadillac Automobile Company of Boston, who acted as the primary distributor for both Packard and Cadillac automobiles. The build sheet is annotated with “ship after 1/2/35” and “SHOW CAR” indicating this was the actual car displayed at the 1935 Boston Auto Show. Incidentally, Alvan Fuller went on to serve as a congressman and eventually Governor of Massachusetts; no doubt thanks to the many highly connected clients he earned selling both Packards AND Cadillacs! Following the auto show, this Town Sedan is believed to have been returned to Cadillac. It was then sold on to its first owner in California. It remained there for the next four decades, eventually finding its way to well-known collector Owen Franklin Hoyt who retained it for many years. In more recent years, it made its way to New Jersey where, after finding its most recent keeper in 2013, it was treated to a thorough mechanical sorting with the goal of reliable road and touring use. Originally finished in Cathedral Grey with Vincennes Red wheels, it was repainted in black some time ago, which suits the elegant lines of the Fleetwood body quite well. The paintwork is older and shows some signs of age and use, but it remains quite handsome with an honest appeal. Recent work has included re-chroming of the exterior brightwork which smartens up the appearance quite nicely. Aside from the respray in black, the body is highly original and shows excellent panel fit and alignment. Being a Town Sedan body, the cabin is free of a passenger division, allowing for a more comfortable driving position with little sacrifice to passenger comfort in the rear. New carpets have been fitted as part of the refresh, however it is believed the grey whipcord upholstery is original, as it matches the detail on the build sheet. Upholstery condition is outstanding, particularly when considering it is over 80 years old. The interior chrome and polished brightwork appear to be original, displaying an inviting and dignified patina. The instrument faces wear fabulous art-deco markings and appear to be all original. The matching Jaeger clock is particularly interesting and a fantastic period touch. With the idea of making a thoroughly capable tour car, the previous owner thoroughly vetted the running gear. New tires have been fitted on the black wire wheels, along with a newly fitted clutch, rebuilt brakes and a new exhaust system. Concurrently, the engine was given a top-end overhaul, with new valves and ancillaries such as water pump, starter, generator and carburetor being replaced or rebuilt. It now performs with the unmistakable solidity that comes from a car that has never been fully torn down and restored. Thanks to the efforts of the previous owners and the inherently wonderful-driving nature of the 355D, this rare and elegant Fleetwood-bodied Cadillac is a competent, reliable tour car for CCCA CARavans or any other adventures you may plan.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1960 Mercedes-Benz 319 Bus

    $189,500(£146,483.50)

    Mercedes-Benz has had a long history of building trucks and commercial vehicles; in fact, it is the company founder Gottlieb Daimler who is credited with creating the very first motorized truck in 1886 – a cart with a 4hp twin-cylinder petrol engine. He found swift success and would soon expand his offerings with 10, 8 and 6 horsepower versions that could carry upwards of 11,000 pounds and cementing the horseless carriage’s importance within industry. Prior to Daimler’s merger with Karl Benz in 1926, both firms had ventured into diesel truck production, which carried over once the two merged and Mercedes-Benz was born. They continued to be pioneers in the industry with the first diesel powered light truck in 1932 and a whole series of medium and heavy duty trucks following through to the outbreak of WWII. In the mid -1950s, Mercedes commercial vehicle lineup included large trucks and buses, as well as small, city-type delivery vehicles. Medium duty trucks such as the Opel Blitz were selling well and Mercedes Benz wanted in on the action. The L 319 and its bus counterpart the O 319 debuted in 1955 to take on the middle-weight market. It featured a front engine “forward control” arrangement with a large glasshouse and pleasing styling. An array of bodies were available, from delivery vans to flatbeds to small buses. The stylish and versatile L/O 319 proved a great success for Mercedes and established them as leaders in the medium duty truck market. Today’s collectors have fallen for the charming good looks and impressive quality, and the compact size makes them very versatile for regular use. As a result, values continue to be on the rise. This truly remarkable 1961 O 319 bus has been fully restored to a high standard and extensively yet subtly modified into a camper capable of roaming virtually anywhere a road will take you. The previous owner and builder was an eccentric and reclusive individual who utilized his tremendous skills to painstakingly restore and enhance this unique Mercedes Benz over a period of 15 years. It is quite like nothing we have ever encountered and it has been a thrill to discover the meticulous level of detail he imparted in this project. As you approach this O 319, you first see a beautifully restored but standard body with exceptionally straight panels, all original bright work and fine detailing. The doors and deck lids fit with factory precision and all shut with that signature Mercedes-Benz solidity that one might not expect from something that started life as a commercial vehicle. The blue over gray paint scheme is done in factory colors, and is beautifully finished to a very high standard over excellent bodywork. It wears a set of rare and attractive factory wheel covers and is fitted with a factory dual-rear wheel setup. As delightful as this bus appears from up top, it is the work under the skin that has truly blown us away. The chassis has been fully reworked with a modern air-ride suspension system adapted to the both the front and rear (the standard rear axle remains). The entire system has been meticulously installed with precise plumbing and expertly run wiring. Details such as the custom made stainless steel loom clamps for wiring and plumbing are astounding. Beyond the air ride suspension system, the electrics have been fully upgraded with a full circuit breaker system on a centralized control panel and even a drop-down service panel below the bus that can accommodate virtually any power plug in the world, should you find a campground with power on your global adventure. Every control, cubby and compartment inside and out is wired with a micro-switch to illuminate when opened. The aviation-quality electrical panels and controls are beautifully backlit in green for easy reading regardless of conditions. Propane and water tanks are located underneath the body as well, seamlessly integrated along the frame rails and installed with the precise touch of a gifted engineer. Power comes from a modern Mercedes Benz engine mated to an automatic transmission. A Gear Vendor overdrive unit backs the transmission and ensures comfortable and efficient highway cruising. As with everything else, the drivetrain installation is superb, with fastidiously run wiring and plumbing giving an appearance that is better than factory original. The electrical system has been thoughtfully upgraded to handle the additional load of the accessories, and the addition of an oil cooler keeps transmission temperatures in check. Modern model fuel injection ensures reliable running in virtually all conditions, and an array of remapped chips is included, presumably to accommodate high altitudes or other extreme conditions. This level of detail and forethought is simply astounding. Of course the cabin has been thoroughly reworked and it features modern, leather covered seats up front and a comfortable berth in the rear for sleeping. Gray carpeting is in excellent condition and expertly bound along the edges with wood trim. A standard O 319 instrument panel has been enhanced with additional back lighting, and many of the upgraded electrics are operated through original Mercedes Benz switchgear. Behind the driver, a custom-made cabinet houses the sink, propane stove and storage for dishes and sundries. Aforementioned water and propane tanks are mounted below the floor. Dual audio systems are beautifully integrated into the front and rear, hidden within custom made cabinets. Even the trunk features a custom made drawer which houses a myriad of spares for virtually any emergency. The builder cleverly integrated a stowable solar panel for when you’re properly off the grid! While we know little about the previous owner, we understand he was an eccentric computer engineer based in California. However, his personality speaks clearly through his exquisite workmanship and his meticulous attention to detail. We understand it took him over 15 years to build this remarkable machine and we are honored to offer it to its next keeper. It is thoroughly sorted and ready for adventure virtually anywhere the road will take you and includes a massive stock of spares and literature. Well and truly, there is not another vehicle quite like this O 319 on earth.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1971 Lancia Fulvia Coupe

    $46,500(£35,944.50)

    Since the earliest days of Lancia, the Torino-based car builder took an innovative and ingenious approach in their quest to produce some of the finest cars available. Lancia competed for buyers with the likes of Alfa Romeo in the pre-war era, and while Alfas were fast, flamboyant and exotic, Lancias were the Thinking Man's sports car; more measured and conservatively styled, yet always exquisitely engineered, beautifully constructed and highly advanced. In the post-war years, both Alfa Romeo and Lancia drastically shifted focus from limited production luxury cars to mid-priced, mass-produced GT cars and saloons. Also like their neighbors at Alfa Romeo, most Lancia models were available in Berlina, Coupe or Cabriolet form, designed and built by a variety of preferred Italian coachbuilders. With the V6-powered, monocoque Aurelia leading the range into the 1950s, Lancia required more entry-level models to stay afloat and compete with Alfa’s new Giulietta. The Aurelia was joined by the V4-powered Appia, an entry level car in terms of price but still built with the same high standard of engineering excellence and quality ingrained into every Lancia product. Following in the footsteps of the Appia, came an all-new car for 1963: The narrow-angle V4-powered, front-drive Fulvia. Lancia’s baby Fulvia borrowed its layout from the larger executive-class Flavia, but in a tidy and compact package. Initially offered only as a four-door Berlina, the line was supplemented by the Lancia-styled Coupe and lightweight Zagato-bodied Sport in 1965. The Fulvia’s elegantly simple monocoque chassis featured independent wishbone front suspension with a single transverse leaf spring, backed by a beam rear axle located by a Panhard rod. Four-wheel disc brakes were standard from the onset, and Lancias typically precise build quality made for a car that felt far more expensive than it was. The Berlina was certainly a capable and stylish little car, but it was the crisp and elegant coupe that captured the most attention, and has since become a true icon among enthusiasts. While the Fulvia coupe’s rallying exploits have certainly cemented its legendary status among hardcore enthusiasts, the road going Fulvia is no less brilliant. The simple and elegant styling was executed in-house rather than by an outside coachbuilder. By the time the series II had arrived, the styling had been tweaked (though remaining no less beautiful) and the mechanical spec updated with a 90 hp 1.3 liter engine, larger Girling disc brakes and a 5-speed transaxle. Collectors have caught on to these brilliant little cars and as such, values have been steadily on the rise, with the rally-bred 1.6HF topping the charts. The second series 1.3S may lack the grunt of its bigger sibling, but it is no less joyful and beautifully delicate to drive. Lancia's exquisite Fulvia truly is one of the greatest driver’s cars of all time. This handsome 1971 Fulvia 1.3S presents in lovely condition, following a sympathetic restoration to original specification. A recent Italian import, this Fulvia was originally purchased as a graduation gift for a young Italian lawyer, Avocat Chimenti, by his family. Chimenti enjoyed his Fulvia for many years before handing the car over to his family mechanic for careful storage and maintenance. It remained in Chimenti's ownership until 2012.  In 2013, the Fulvia arrived in the USA where it was treated to a no-expense-spared mechanical and cosmetic refurbishment, with great care given to preserve its exceptional originality. Today, it remains a beautifully honest example finished in the original and attractive combination of dark blue over dark tan upholstery. The body is straight and tidy with very good older paint and nice, factory precise panel gaps. Some light texture is evident in the paint in places but it is overall a very presentable and imminently attractive car. The sparse and delicate brightwork presents in very good condition, a mix of carefully selected originals, restored pieces and correct replacements. The restorer resisted the urge to fit larger wheels, instead restoring the correct originals which are wrapped in proper Michelin XAS rubber. The car sits proudly, looking proper and light on its feet, the correct wheels and tires retain the Fulvia's delicacy and communicative feedback. OEM headlamps with distinctive yellow bulbs add yet another layer of appeal. The simple yet stylish cabin is trimmed in caramel tan upholstery with black carpets, trim and correct rubber mats. Front and rear, the seats are in fine order and complement the matching door cards. Rubber mats and other soft trim are in excellent condition, and the dash panel is free of cracks or fading. The original fiberboard fascia has been replaced with a gorgeous, glossy wood piece and the original Jaeger instruments have been carefully and thoroughly restored. The original shift knob remains in place and a period correct Nardi steering wheel dresses up the cabin nicely. Original touches such as Lancia dealer decals in the quarter windows and a very cool dealer-accessory service calendar add to the delightful period charm of this fine Fulvia. Lifting the bonnet reveals a very correct and well detailed engine bay. The narrow-angle 1.3 liter V4 engine is very tidy and honestly presented with correct wiring and hardware, proper finishes on the ancillaries and factory-correct decals and markings. The undercarriage is similarly tidy, with factory assembly marks present on the subframes. The chassis was refurbished with fresh and correct DeCarbon shocks and the tricky front axle CV joint boots replaced. The original jack, vinyl spare wheel cover, and Lancia tool kit remain in place. With just one owner over a span of four decades, this lovely Lancia has clearly been cherished since the day it left the dealership floor. Thanks to the careful and sympathetic work it received from its most recent keeper, it remains fresh and ready for enjoyment, certain to capture the heart of its next owner.

    Last update: About 1 Month Old
    For sale
  • 1912 Ford Model T Commercial Roadster

    $54,500(£42,128.50)

    The Ford Model T is a machine that ranks as one of the most significant and important inventions of the 20th century. Henry Ford’s development of the moving assembly line was so significant that he is oft compared to the likes of Alexander Graham Bell and Eli Whitney as the most influential names in American Industrial history. The Model T is likely the only car to feature in our grade school history books. Of course, most of the focus in history is given to the way the Model T was built and how Henry Ford revolutionized mass manufacture. However, when viewed apart from the ingenious production methods, the Model T proved to be a truly remarkable and versatile machine. Because he was able to build so many so quickly, the price was low and suddenly the automobile was accessible to millions who never dreamed of owning one before. Its popularity spawned an aftermarket industry that allowed the T to be adapted to virtually anything: From racing cars to farm implements, the Model T could do it all. Ford was enough in tune with his customer needs to offer a wide variety of bodies to meet demand. Touring cars and Depot Hacks moved people, while the Pickup and Commercial Roadster offered versatility for tradesmen. The Commercial Roadster was a simple, two seat affair with a flat deck behind the cockpit. Curiously, a “mother-in-law seat” was standard equipment; mounted atop a small storage trunk on the rear platform. The primary difference between a standard roadster and commercial roadster was the extended flat platform behind the cabin of the latter, rather than a curved trunk. The vestigial seat and trunk were often removed and discarded to make way for pickup boxes or any variety of attachments to suit the job at hand. As such, intact survivors are quite rare today. This 1912 Model T Commercial Roadster is a relatively early example from the height of the brass era. The green and black paint scheme is correct for the year, as it predates Henry Ford’s shift to all-black Model Ts of later years. Unlike the majority of Model Ts which have been restored by hobbyists, this example wears a professional quality restoration and presents in absolutely lovely condition with excellent paint work, gorgeous quality brass and concours level detailing. Equipment includes brass Ford-script E&J headlamps and cowl lamps, a gorgeous brass radiator shell, polished brass horn and a beautiful acetylene tank on the running board. Brass step plates adorn the running boards, with a single right-side plate correctly placed for rear seat access. The driver’s compartment is exquisitely detailed with beautifully executed black leather upholstery on the seat, a correct Ford-script rubber mat and beautifully finished wood on the cowl panel. The mother in law seat is trimmed in the same high quality black leather as up front, and it sits atop the small utility trunk that now houses an assortment of spares. Weather protection comes via the full, dual pane windscreen, which folds for fair weather use, and the folding black leather top. The top fit is excellent and it is well detailed with correct brass hardware. Pyramid-pattern floor boards adorn the rear platform as original and the impressive woodwork is indicative of the care and attention that went into the restoration. While a Model T engine is an exercise in minimalism, this example is nonetheless very well presented and detailed. It is exceptionally clean, showing little use since the restoration was completed, and the engine is detailed with appropriate fittings and hardware. Finishes on the chassis are also excellent, with the undercarriage appearing incredibly clean and tidy. Along with its many other “firsts” the Model T can be credited with forming the foundation of the collector car hobby. With over 15 million built over the course of 19 years, there is certainly no shortage of cars to choose from. However, it is the early brass cars such as this that command attention from serious collectors. This example’s relatively rare configuration and outstanding restoration set it apart from the usual. It remains in lovely show-quality condition and is fully usable and ready for enjoyment.

    Last update: 2 Months Old
    For sale
  • 1938 Mercedes-Benz 170 V Cabriolet

    $179,500(£138,753.50)

    Mercedes-Benz has long demonstrated the power of a diverse product portfolio. With an ethos of quality and innovation above all, Mercedes-Benz has made their mark in virtually every aspect of over the road transport, from taxicabs to Formula 1 cars, supercars to heavy trucks. Although they are most closely associated with luxury, Mercedes-Benz wisely relied upon the middle of the market to provide the majority of their sales over the years. When the luxury car market sagged in the 1930s, Mercedes-Benz was quick to realize the importance of expanding their offerings, yet crucially, they managed to do so without cheapening their brand and damaging their reputation for quality. The 170 was conceived to compete in the mid-priced market, making its debut at the Paris Auto Salon in 1931. Chassis engineer Hans Nibel designed the platform which featured revolutionary all-independent suspension in a lightweight chassis. The ride quality and handling prowess were far and above superior to other vehicles in the same class. The new model proved quite popular, with nearly 70,000 examples built before 1941. Found within the 170 range was a wide variety of vehicles that utilized the innovative chassis. Mercedes-Benz offered it as a two- or four-door sedan, two- or four-seat cabriolet, roadster, cabrio-sedan, open touring car, Sedan Delivery, taxi, ambulance, or pickup. Eventually, the range-topping Cabriolet A was added to the mix. The Cabriolet A was a product of the prestigious Sindelfingen coachbuilding department, Mercedes’ in-house custom body builder. Herman Ahrens arrived at Mercedes-Benz in 1932, setting up a custom coachbuilding shop at the Sindelfingen works. His reputation for quality was established at that Deutsche Industrie Werke in Berlin as well as with Horch where he designed some of that firm’s most prestigious motorcars.  Alongside Walter Hacker, who joined him at Mercedes in 1933, Mercedes-Benz styling was transformed and the duo produced some of their most breathtaking designs on the 540K chassis.  For buyers of somewhat more modest means than the typical 540K client, the 170 V Cabriolet offered the cachet of a Sindelfingen-designed body at a more reasonable (though still not insignificant) $1,459 in 1936. Rather than modifying a mass-produced model, each Cabriolet A was hand built alongside its more expensive stablemates. The resemblance to its larger sibling can be seen in the graceful sweep of the front wings, the taper of the bonnet as it flows from cowl to radiator grille and the elegant proportions. Our featured example of this rare and desirable coachbuilt Mercedes-Benz was recently part of the collection of renowned contemporary American realist painter Jamie Wyeth. It was completely restored beginning in 1990 by Magno Restorations of Massachusetts and has been featured in the May/June 1997 issue of The Star magazine. It has been very well cared for since the high-quality restoration was completed, and it presents today in lovely condition. The two-tone black and red paint is period correct and highlights the handsome lines of this rare and desirable body. Beautiful concours-quality chrome work remains in excellent order and the body fit and alignment reveal this as a very high level restoration. The signature of the 170 V are the stylish steel disc wheels, in this case painted in red to complement the body sides and provide some visual pop against the black wings. The body style is simple yet finely detailed with features such as an inset rear-mount spare tire, a small “trunk” behind the top, exposed landau irons and cowl-mounted trafficators. The cabin is trimmed in lovely dark red leather that complements the exterior paint scheme. The soft trim remains in very good condition, showing signs of light use since the restoration, but presenting with a welcoming broken-in character. Instruments, switchgear and interior brightwork are all in very good order, again showing some light use but remaining very attractive. A side-facing rear seat is fitted for the occasional second passenger, providing they don’t mind the cozy experience. Beneath the bonnet is a simple and humble appearing 1,697 cc side-valve four-cylinder which produces 38hp. Our example is well detailed with proper fittings and hardware, though not over restored or fussy. The engine produces 38hp and delivers the power to the rear wheels via a four-speed manual transmission. Four wheel hydraulic brakes and independent suspension allow for this car to feel much younger than its 79 years. Following its high quality restoration, this car was shown at a great number of prestigious events such as Meadow Brook, Castle Hill Concours, Lime Rock Vintage Fall Festival, Radnor Hunt Concours and others. It was displayed at the Lars Anderson Museum’s Mercedes Retrospective and even featured in advertising for Saks Fifth Avenue. It remains in handsome condition, and is ready for use in tours, rallies or simply to enjoy for its delightful road manners on your favorite country roads. This is a wonderful opportunity to acquire a true Sindelfingen coachbuilt Mercedes-Benz that can be thoroughly enjoyed on the road or on a show field.

    Last update: 2 Months Old
    For sale
  • 1913 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost Sports Tourer

    $895,000(£691,835)

    The Rolls-Royce 40/50hp “Silver Ghost” made its spectacular debut in 1907, recognized almost immediately as the finest motorcar money could buy. At the heart of the 40/50hp was Henry Royce’s impressively powerful and reliable 7,428cc side-valve inline-six.  In its day, the inline-six configuration was considered a folly as competitors could not cope with the issue of long, flexing crankshafts. But Royce’s engine had a crank that was shorter and stronger, and which was supported by seven large main bearings. Exacting, precise machine work and hand-polishing of internal components ensured near silent, smoke-free operation – a characteristic that was virtually unheard of for the time. Features such as pressurized oiling, fixed heads to eliminate leaks, and a twin ignition system via magneto or distributor were advancements that established the Silver Ghost as the standard of the world for motorcars. Particularly when compared to other machinery of the same period, the Silver Ghost is a true marvel of sophisticated engineering and build-quality, capable of delivering near silent operation and a luxurious experience drivers and passengers alike. In Rolls-Royce’s early days, their chief competition came from Napier. Under the directorship of S.F. Edge, Napier had embraced the idea of the publicity stunt in order to drive sales and prove its machinery in the toughest of conditions. Rolls-Royce was always rather more conservative yet they relented under the pressure from their London-based rivals and in 1911, took on the RAC-sanctioned London to Edinburgh Challenge to prove they built the finest, most reliable and best performing cars in the world. The challenge was seen as the perfect venue to showcase the latest upgrades to the 40/50hp model. Chassis 1701 was the second such car to receive improved specification that included a massive torque tube sending power to the strengthened rear axle, larger carburetor and a higher compression ratio engine. Fitted with a sporting, close coupled light-touring body by Holmes of Derby, Ltd, chassis 1701 completed the entirety of the 800 miles challenge in top gear, achieving an average consumption of 24.32 miles per gallon. Later, that same car achieved 78.26 miles per hour at Brooklands. The success in the London-Edinburgh challenge led to a raft of new orders for similarly spec’d cars – heretofore known as the London to Edinburgh Ghost. Between spring of 1912 and October of 1913 (ending with chassis 2699) just 188 examples were built – a mere fraction of the total Silver Ghost production of 6,700 cars. Our featured 1913 40/50hp Silver Ghost, chassis number 2371, is one of these coveted London-Edinburgh specification cars. Original build sheets indicate this car was a direct copy of chassis 2148, which in itself was a direct copy of the famous “1701” works car. Originally clothed in a popular Torpedo style body by Barker, 2371 was delivered new to one Albert Janesich of the illustrious Janesich Jewelry family. Highly detailed notes on the factory build sheets indicate it was specified with Rudge-Whitworth wire wheels, Dunlop grooved tires, C.A. Vandervell lighting, multiple Brooks trunks, cobra horn, speedometer calibrated in KM and an additional clock. Janesich’s fabulous new Rolls-Royce was briefly registered in the UK, though very soon sent across the channel to Paris. Originally finished in silver gray with ivory lines and upholstery, it would have no doubt been a striking machine to see motoring the streets of Paris in its day. A small accident necessitated a return to the factory for a comprehensive rebuild in 1927, though from there the trail of the history is temporarily lost. As with many such cars living in Europe, 2371 was most likely dismantled and hidden from the Germans during WWII. It wasn’t until the 1990s when the chassis was discovered in Paris by two enthusiasts who were tipped off to the possible existence of a Silver Ghost in the city. Following its discovery, the chassis would pass to a noted marque enthusiast Walter Wilson of Ireland who, working with James Black, would commission a comprehensive rebuild. The original engine had long since been missing, so Wilson and Black found a comparable spec unit from 1914 carrying the number 10 K. Interestingly, the body that 2371 wears today was once fitted to the original works London-Edinburgh chassis; 1701 having been fitted with the body by Kenneth Neve in 1970. A later restoration of 1701 made that body available, becoming a fine match for our chassis 2371. As a finishing touch to the restoration, the original 1913 British registration number – R 1733 – was officially returned to the car. Walter Wilson thoroughly enjoyed his restored Ghost for the next two decades before passing it to the most recent owner in 2014. It is currently presented in white with tan leather upholstery and beautiful nickel plated fittings and it has a delightfully low-slung and sporty appearance, particularly riding on the correct spec Rudge Whitworth wire wheels. The restoration has held up extremely well; with an inviting, broken-in appeal thanks to Mr. Wilson’s time spent enjoying his motorcar. The car remains mechanically sound and would make the ideal companion for long-distance touring as it was originally intended. Mechanically and cosmetically sound, and with a fascinating history documented via build sheets as well as within the pages of the respected reference work “The Edwardian Rolls-Royce”, chassis number 2371 is a well-known, delightfully attractive and usable example of this highly desirable model.

    Last update: 2 Months Old
    For sale
  • 1956 Mercedes-Benz 300 C Sedan

    $87,500(£67,637.50)

    Prior to the release of the spectacular 300SL sports car in 1954, the 300 Sedan and Coupe starred as the ultimate models in the Mercedes-Benz lineup. The big 300 was among the finest and most luxurious automobiles available, competing with the likes of Rolls-Royce, Bentley and Cadillac for top honors among captains of industry and heads of state alike. Famously, the 300 found favor with Germany’s Chancellor, Konrad Adenauer, who ordered a fleet of six custom bodied variants that he used during his fourteen year tenure. The car was thusly nicknamed Adenauer after its most influential and powerful admirer. Internally known as the W186, the big 300 was powered by a 2,996 c.c. SOHC inline six cylinder engine. Twin Solex carburetors fed the engine which produced 136 hp, feeding power through either a 4-speed manual or 3-speed Borg-Warner automatic gearbox. The robust power plant served as the basis for the legendary 300SL; canted over and fitted with Bosch mechanical injection and dry-sump lubrication for sports car duty. The W186 chassis featured independent front suspension along with a coil-sprung swing-axle in the rear. Handling and braking were excellent for a car of the 300’s size and many owners chose to drive rather than be driven. Given the clientele, a variety of custom and limited bodies were offered, including full and partial cabriolets and divider-window limousines. The 300B and 300C were eventually replaced by the slightly larger 300D which was different enough to necessitate a new chassis designation, W189, which continued through 1962 before being replaced by the highly advanced 600 saloons and limousines. This striking 1956 Mercedes-Benz 300C wears a factory correct shade of Strawberry red, an attractive yet rather unlikely color for a car that was generally preferred by more conservative clientele. An included factory build sheet confirms this as the original, factory issued color (Code DB543). Beyond the unexpected paint scheme, it is also equipped with a wonderful full-length Webasto sunroof. Wearing an older, though extremely well-maintained restoration, it presents in excellent condition throughout. The quality of the restoration is apparent in the very strong and consistent panel fit and body work. These are notoriously difficult and complex cars to restore, and it is clear this car has benefited from expert attention. The exterior trim on the W186 is almost entirely chrome-on-brass, and on this car it is presented in very good order. We believe some trim items such as the window surrounds to be original, and while they show a few minor flaws, it hardly detracts from the overall sense of quality this car conveys. Mercedes’ stately radiator grille has excellent plating, and is flanked by a pair of original Bosch fog lamps mounted on the lower aprons. It rides on original steel wheels with chrome beauty rings and correct color-keyed chrome hubcaps. Blackwall bias ply tires are perfectly judged against the brilliant paintwork, and provide the proper stance and period correct look. Complementing the strawberry red paint is a caramel tan interior which we believe retains original leather upholstery on the seats along with restored woodwork and newer carpets. The leather has been refurbished and presents quite well, and while the driver’s seat does show some moderate wear to the finish, the cabin remains quite pleasing and inviting. The blonde woodwork is a wonderful complement to the tan leather and exterior paint, and the vast wood dash is certainly a highlight of the interior. It is equipped a full array of original instruments, beautiful chrome switchgear, and the original VDO clock which sits proudly above the original Becker Mexico AM/FM radio. Rear passengers get to ride in comfort with a fold down armrest and clever windwings which keep buffeting to a minimum when the windows are open. Interior chrome fittings are up to the standard of the exterior, with beautiful quality finishing. The trunk is also nicely presented, with carpeted panels and a single spare wheel mounted in the right hand compartment. On the left side, a compartment houses a very rare factory spare parts kit. Beneath the hood, Mercedes’ robust 3.0 liter inline six is very well presented with correct natural finish alloy castings and black finished inner panels. Decals on the cam cover, period-look battery and elsewhere add a high degree of factory-correct detail and the majority of hardware and clamps appear to be correct. It is exceptionally clean and tidy, showing careful maintenance since the restoration was completed. The optional Borg-Warner automatic shifts well, and the car performs effortlessly. This handsome and imposing Mercedes-Benz 300C is one of just 885 examples built in 1956 out of a total of 1,432 examples overall. It is a rare and very desirable example of Mercedes-Benz ultimate expression of mid-century luxury.

    Last update: 2 Months Old
    For sale
  • 1970 Monteverdi 375L Coupe

    $305,000(£235,765)

    Given the fact that the Swiss share borders with the titans of industry in Germany, the passionate, fiery Italians, and the Avant-Garde French it seems rather curious that Switzerland never became a motoring industry powerhouse in its own right. After all, Switzerland has no shortage of Alpine passes to tear up and down in a hard edged sports car, nor cosmopolitan cities to arrive in style in a luxurious GT car. And thanks to the Swiss banking industry, there’s also no shortage of cash to go around. Yet the Swiss curiously left the car building up to its neighbors and essentially stuck with banks and timepieces – with one very notable exception in the form of Peter Monteverdi. At the age of 16, Peter Monteverdi constructed his first car, a Fiat 1100-based special he built in the back of his father’s garage business. He went on to found MBM, where he built a series of karts and smallbore racing cars. In order to support his fledgling business he began importing Ferraris to Switzerland in 1957, eventually earning a position as the official Swiss distributor for Ferrari. His importing business soon grew to include a stable of luxury cars that included BMW, Lancia and Rolls Royce/Bentley. In 1967, following a falling out with Enzo Ferrari (a seemingly common occurrence) Peter Monteverdi teamed up with Pietro Frua to design a full-fledged GT car suitable for tackling those magnificent Swiss roads as well as his demanding clients. Monteverdi took full advantage of the skills of his neighbors by outfitting his new GT with a steel chassis built in Germany, and clothed it in sexy Italian coachwork. Pietro Frua was hired to design the two-seat 375S, and the body did share some notable similarities to the AC 428 and Maserati Mistral, also Frua designs. Power came courtesy of Chrysler’s massive 440 cubic-inch Magnum V8. However, Monteverdi soon realized the demand for a four-seat grand tourer was stronger than his two seat model. So the 375L replaced the S, with a design that was based on Frua’s work, but tweaked by Monteverdi himself to accommodate two generous rear seats. The 375L was built by Fissore, however, the similarity to Frua’s original work did not go unnoticed by the Italian and he sued Monteverdi for a licensing fee. Regardless of the drama, Monteverdi attracted a unique clientele – wealthy eccentrics who eschewed traditional, mainstream sports cars in favor Peter Monteverdi’s Swiss beauties. This 1969 Monteverdi 375L Coupe is a very fine example from the almost-mythical Swiss manufacturer. It is finished in a flattering shade of dark blue which very nicely suits the crisp Fissore-built body. Paint and body quality is very good, with very good panel fit and just a few minor flaws in the paint, though nothing that detracts from what is otherwise a very attractive and totally usable car. It rides on a set of Borrani wire wheels which add a welcome amount of sparkle to the understated styling. The original cast alloy wheels will also be included in the sale. The razor-like chrome bumpers are excellent and the polished headlamp surrounds and grille appear in very good order. The 375L was conceived as a Ferrari-beating high-speed touring car, so luxury of the highest order was high on Peter Monteverdi’s list. Our example is trimmed in beautiful caramel colored leather, presenting in wonderful condition and offering a gorgeous contrast to the dark blue paintwork. The distinct center console dominates the dash, its width necessitated by a chassis design that placed the Chrysler big-block engine and transmission well behind the axle line. It features an updated stereo system and air conditioning, perfect for cross-continent touring. The big-block Chrysler “Magnum” 440 presents in very good condition; clean and tidy with good detailing and signs of recent service. It runs strong and needs nothing but to be driven and enjoyed. Actual production numbers for the 375 aren’t widely known, as records are held closely by the ex-factory museum in Basel. Not only does the Monteverdi 375L have rarity on its side, it is a genuinely well-built and cleverly engineered automobile. Comparisons to other Euro-American hybrids such as the Jensen Interceptor or Iso Rivolta are natural, however, the 375 should really be compared to the Ferrari 365 2+2 or Maserati Mexico in terms of performance, quality and luxury. Given the fact that it cost as much as a Mercedes-Benz 600 when new, it is easy to see where Peter Monteverdi was aiming his sights. These incredible cars rarely come up for sale on the open market and we are thrilled to offer such a fine and inviting example.

    Last update: 2 Months Old
    For sale
  • 1950 Allard K1 Roadster

    $159,500(£123,293.50)

    American sports car enthusiasts owe more to British engineer Sydney Allard than they may know. Operating out of his small London garage business, he became famous for his successes in trials competition in the 1930s, driving his own creations that were usually powered by Ford or Lincoln engines and featuring Leslie Ballamy-designed split-axle independent front suspension. During WWII, Allard serviced and rebuilt mainly Ford military vehicles and by the time the war was over, he had amassed a large array of spares and an extremely well-equipped shop. Faced with a pile of surplus engines, he expanded his offerings from trials cars into road going cars with the K1 of 1949. The K1 featured a box-section chassis, Ballamy’s innovative front suspension, live rear axle and an attractive two-seat steel body. Power came via British-built Ford or Mercury V8 engines, with the Mercury being the performance choice thanks to its 95hp output. Some of those engines were offered with the Ardun OHV conversion developed by Zora-Arkus Duntov, a man who was Allard’s technical advisor and who went on to become the father of the Corvette at Chevrolet. With the K1 and subsequent models, Allard made quite a splash in the fledgling American road-racing scene. Open road racing was gaining popularity in the USA, as WWII veterans were returning home with sports cars purchased in Europe and were seeking a suitable place to exploit their performance. Allard was there to provide affordable sporting cars that could return serious performance and win races- particularly the famous Olds and Cadillac powered J2 and J2X. Allards went on to become a mainstay of early sports car racing in America. At places like Pebble Beach, Watkins Glen and Bridgehampton, Allards came to dominate high-speed open road races and they inspired the likes of Carrol Shelby, Jack Griffith, and others to shove big Yank V8 engines into nimble British chassis. This fascinating 1950 K1/K2 is believed to be the only example of its kind, ordered directly from Allard by an American enthusiast. Thanks to comprehensive documentation that dates back to the original order, we can see that the first owner ordered a new K2, with its revised styling and improved chassis. But shortly thereafter, the order for the K2 was canceled and he instead requested an older K1! Allard obliged, though the car was actually built on the superior coil-sprung K2 chassis, and fitted with specially made, backdated K1 bodywork. The car was delivered in the ‘States via John Forbes Agency of Boston, Massachusetts. From there it is believed it was disassembled and stored in the late 1950s, until it was subsequently sold in 1972. The Allard was gradually rebuilt over a 30 year period and, in 2003 was professionally restored to the state in which it presents today. Finished in an attractive color scheme of silver paint over a pewter-grey cockpit, it presents in beautiful condition today. The quality of the paint work is outstanding with excellent levels of finish work and detailing. The car sits proudly on a set of black steel wheels with correct Allard dog-dish hubcaps and period appropriate blackwall bias-ply tires. Chrome on the bumpers and prominent grille is in excellent order. The silver paint highlights the beautiful curves of the K1 body, especially from the rear three-quarter view. The spartan cabin is trimmed in pewter-gray leather and gray carpeting. The leather is in very good order, showing only minor creasing from use, with an inviting patina. The four-spoke Brooklands-style steering wheel is leather wrapped for additional grip, a handy feature when burying your right foot in the carpet. Instrumentation is simple and tidy, with original Smiths gauges placed in the center of a nicely restored wood dash panel. Under the hood is a 1947 Ford flathead V8 engine, rated in period at 85 hp, though now producing significantly more thanks to an overbore to 295 cubic inches, beautiful Edelbrock heads and a trio of Stromberg 97 carburetors. An alternator has been fitted for reliable running day or night, and an electric fan keeps engine temps in check. This attractive and well-sorted Allard K1/K2 is an outstanding choice for vintage rallying or show, and its presentation, history and bespoke nature make it a standout even among the rarified company of other Allards. The sale of this fine automobile includes comprehensive historical documentation, a selection of original tools and a fitted tonneau cover.

    Last update: 2 Months Old
    For sale