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  • 1978 Ferrari 308 GTB Coupe

    For sale
    $62,500(£0)

    Ferrari’s first attempt at replacing the sublime, V6 powered Dino 246 came with the Bertone-bodied 308 GT4 2+2; a fine car which failed to enthuse buyers in the same way as the original. The V8-powered Dino GT4 was certainly a competent road car, but the angular Bertone styling drew criticism as it was considered too radical a departure from the svelte and curvaceous 246 GT. Ferrari went back to the drawing board, and Leonardo Fiavoranti designed the 308 GTB which, despite having grown in size and capacity, was more in line with the original Dino, thanks in part to the two-seat configuration and beautiful Pininfarina coachwork. Now officially a full-fledged Ferrari model, the new 308 GTB/GTS featured the GT4’s 3.0 liter four-cam V8 with four downdraught Weber carburetors and a 5-speed transaxle, though it was seen as all-around better sorted and more stylish. The 308 GTB and its targa-topped sibling the GTS would become a runaway success for Ferrari, as well as a pop-culture icon, selling more than 12,000 examples over a 10 year production span – Ferrari’s most successful model to date by a massive margin. This 1978 308 GTB is a rare and desirable carbureted Berlinetta that has been very well maintained via well-known West Coast specialists coming most recently from large collection of European sports cars. This example features a host of subtle upgrades that improve the driving experience without sacrificing the purity and balance of the original design. The most obvious modification is the set of 17-inch split-rim 5-spoke Speedline alloy wheels, reminiscent of those used on the iconic F40 and 288 GTO. Those wheels, which are necessary to clear the four-wheel “Big Red” Brembo brake calipers and cross drilled discs borrowed from a 360 Modena, are fitted with low-profile tires which tuck nicely under the stock arches. In addition to the extra grip provided by the larger rubber, fatter sway bars and adjustable coil-over dampers have been fitted front and rear to improve stability and allow this 308 to corner flat and with confidence. The 308 is set up to sit just slightly lower than stock, and thanks to the high-quality suspension components, handling and road manners are now razor sharp. Receipts show the 3.0 liter quad-cam V8 engine has been serviced by marque experts, with the timing belts last changed in 2013 and the air conditioning system fully rebuilt in 2012, among other service-related items. It has covered just a handful of miles since the work was performed, and it remains a truly outstanding driver. The Tipo F106A V8 is smooth and punchy through the rev range, giving off a truly addictive exhaust note. The 5-speed gearbox feels notably slick and positive, selecting 2nd gear with ease, even when cold. Powerful F360 brakes are more than up to the task of arresting the lightweight 308, and remarkably, the suspension upgrades hone the handling without being rough or jarring to the occupants. Finished in classic Rosso Corsa over tan hides, this 308 GTB is a fine looking car with strong cosmetics inside and out. Paint work is in very good order, and the body straight and tidy. The tan leather seats are excellent, as are the black carpets, console and leather-trimmed dash. A late model radio and F40-style shift knob are the only noticeable changes to the otherwise standard Ferrari cockpit. Well maintained, and with well-judged modifications, this 308 GTB has been transformed into a truly outstanding driver’s car, ideally suited for FCA rallies and tours, or similar road events where the improvements can be fully appreciated.

    For sale
    $62,500(£0)
    Hyman Ltd
    314-524-6000 View contact number
  • 1957 Mercedes-Benz 190 SL Roadster

    For sale
    $129,500(£0)

    In the 1950s, Mercedes-Benz was quickly establishing itself as a dominant force in the automotive market. Mercedes Grand Prix cars and sports-racing machines were sweeping the racetracks of the world and the sensational 300SL sports car had set the world on fire with its exotic spaceframe chassis, race-bred fuel-injected engine and stunning bodywork. At the opposite end of the spectrum, their famously robust buses, trucks and taxi cabs were filling the streets of Europe – and strong sales were filling the coffers back in Stuttgart. While Mercedes had a fairly well-rounded lineup with everything from small sedans to luxury limousines and a super car, their presence in the US was still somewhat tenuous. Americans were still hesitant to buy German cars, but Max Hoffman, the chief importer of Mercedes-Benz cars to the all-important US market, knew just how to get buyers to into his showrooms. When Mr. Hoffman suggested a stylish, affordable and reliable sports car based on the standard production W121 sedan at a significantly reduced price compared to the 300SL, the factory was on board. This new car, called “190SL” for its 1.9 liter engine and “Sports Leicht” designation, didn’t share the 300SL’s exotic tubular space frame and fuel injection system, instead using a shortened W121-sedan unibody platform and a twin-carb version of the sedan’s overhead cam four-cylinder engine. It did, however share some of its big brother’s styling cues as well as a similar layout of independent front suspension with a swing axle out back. With its generous boot, optional removable hard top and easy-going nature, the 190SL was less of a hardcore sports car and more of a fine boulevard cruiser. With the 190SL, Mercedes hit the sweet spot with a comfortable, fun and practical sporty car with a surplus of style. After its unveiling at the New York Auto Show in 1954, Robert Nitske of Speed Age declared it “… a car suited for all purposes, the perfect synthesis of touring and sporting characteristics.” That adage holds true for today’s enthusiasts who admire the 190SL for its versatility, quality, and unmistakable style. This gorgeous 1957 190SL roadster is a fully restored and beautifully-presented example fitted with numerous extra-cost factory options. Finished in a striking period correct shade of DB534 feuerwehrrot (fire-engine red) over a gray leather interior, this 190SL is an exquisite example ready for concours or the road. Recently out of a collection that included numerous important sports cars and three generations of Mercedes SLs, it has seen limited use since the exquisite restoration was completed and it remains in remarkably fresh condition. The body exhibits excellent quality paintwork and detailing, with straight, properly aligned panels. Even the body-color wheel wells and correct satin black undercarriage are exceptionally clean, revealing the level of detail that went into this restoration. Factory options include front and rear bumper guards, fog lights, and a locking fuel cap. Correct 13” steel wheels are dressed with fresh Firestone whitewall tires, and the original color-keyed hubcaps to complete the simple yet elegant look. Similar attention to detail was paid to the interior, which has been fully restored using correct-type gray leather and square weave carpeting. The seats are excellent, showing little in the way of use and remaining taut, with supple leather and excellent quality stitching and fit. Factory correct fluted rubber mats and textured transmission covering are fitted, important details that are often overlooked on lesser restorations. Other important fittings include the correct Plexiglas sun visors (leather trimmed visors were fitted just a few cars later), glovebox-mounted clock, an optional side-facing jump seat, original Becker Europa Hi-Fi radio and a very rare set of matching fitted luggage in the boot. Inspired by the 300 SL, the 190 SL fascia contains intricate chrome switchgear and trim, all of which has been restored to the same high level as the rest of the cabin. The 1.9 liter overhead cam four-cylinder engine has been highly detailed with correct labels and decals used throughout the engine bay. The presentation is excellent, and importantly, the engine retains the original twin Solex 44 PHH carburetors, which are too often sacrificed for Webers. In addition, the original airbox and air filter housing remain in place. The engine runs well and road manners are very good, with the car feeling ready for enjoyment on the road. While the big-brother 300SL may have stolen the headlines in the day, it was the stylish little 190 SL that truly established the template for all futures SL-series cars with its exceptional build quality, relaxed performance and timeless good looks. This car’s high quality restoration has been very well preserved, and it presents in excellent order throughout. Highly optioned, beautifully presented and ready to enjoy to the fullest, this 190SL is a exquisite example of Mercedes’ landmark junior sports car.

    For sale
    $129,500(£0)
  • 1930 Packard 734 Speedster Runabout

    For sale
    $225,000(£0)

    In 1930, Packard took a big step outside of its comfort zone when it introduced the sporty, driver-focused 734 Speedster series. The 734 (7thseries, 134” wheelbase) was based on a new, shortened and strengthened chassis that was designed exclusively for this sporting new model. Built in Packard’s new in-house custom shop, the 734 was powered by a revised version of the proven 384.8 cubic inch straight-eight engine, which had been upgraded with a newly designed separate intake manifold, oversize updraught Detroit Lubricator carburetor, optional high-compression cylinder head and a 45-degree mounted, finned exhaust manifold. A larger vacuum booster was added to ensure a steady flow of fuel at high speed, and the engine was mated to a model-specific four-speed gearbox. In the lighter, narrower chassis, the powerful new engine could push the 734 to 100mph. Heavy duty dampers and large finned brake drums were also fitted to keep things under control on the road. Contrary to popular belief, the “Speedster” name was not related to the body style, but to the sporting nature of the special new chassis. Buyers could actually choose from five different custom-catalog body styles, all built by Packard’s custom shop. Choices included the two-seat boat-tail runabout, four-seat runabout roadster with rumble seat, sport phaeton, Victoria coupe, or four door sedan. In spite of the exceptional performance and quality, Packard only sold approximately 113 examples of the 734. The marketing team and dealers were unsure of what to do with such a high-performance machine, given the majority of Packard clients preferred luxury and silent operation over outright speed. Today, the 734 is one of the most desirable Packards ever produced and is considered by many to be one of the greatest cars of the American Classic Era. Considering the scarcity and desirable nature of factory-built 734 speedsters (just twenty-seven of the original 113 survive), it is of little surprise that values easily surpass seven figures on the rare occasion they become available on the open market. Of the five body styles originally offered on the 734 chassis, it is the Two Seat Runabout that is the most sought after. Only 11 are known to exist today and rarely appear on the market, so naturally some resourceful enthusiasts have taken to creating their own versions of these performance icons. Our featured 734 Speedster Runabout is just such a car; a finely crafted and accurately built representation or the original that is impeccably detailed and beautifully presented. The build includes a number of correct original components as employed on the genuine factory-built Speedsters. Serial number 186334 denotes this chassis as a 7th series Deluxe or Custom Eight, delivered in June of 1930. The 134” wheelbase chassis is clothed in a boattail runabout body that is both highly accurate and beautifully constructed. Recently out of a large private collection, this Packard boattail spent some time in Switzerland in the 1990s, where it was issued FIVA documents and used extensively for rallies and Packard Club tours throughout Europe. It returned to the US later in the decade where it took part in the Great American Race. It is now impeccably presented in a very attractive and vibrant red paint scheme with black accents. The car has been very well accessorized with 19” chrome wire wheels wrapped in new blackwall Firestone rubber, dual steerable Pilot-Ray driving lamps, radiator stone guard, mascot and dual sidemount spares. Chrome plating on the fittings and accessories has been restored to a very high standard. The quality of the body construction is first rate, displaying excellent fit and finish throughout. The two-place cockpit is correctly laid out with the signature staggered seating that allowed the driver a bit more elbow room when motoring at speed in the narrower-than-standard cabin. The seats and door panels are trimmed in high quality tan leather and show little use since the car was freshened in the hands of the previous owner. The dash, controls and interior fittings are all properly presented, with the same consistent quality as the rest of the car. A correct style roadster top is trimmed in tan canvas and a pair of matching side curtains are included for all-weather usability. Packard’s legendary 348.8 Cubic Inch inline eight is dressed in Speedster specification with a correct finned exhaust manifold, vacuum tank and two-barrel Detroit Lubricator carburetor. The powerful engine, paired with a period-correct 4-speed gearbox and 3.31:1 rear axle allows for effortless high-speed cruising. It is beautifully presented with outstanding detailing and finish work on the signature Packard Green painted surfaces, along with high quality chrome hardware and fittings. The undercarriage and suspension are spotlessly presented with excellent red paintwork on the chassis, axles and springs. This splendid Packard boattail speedster is a thoroughly enjoyable and impeccably finished automobile that has been artfully crafted to be hardly distinguishable from an original Speedster Runabout. Encompassing all of the style and performance of the factory built originals, it is the ideal choice for rallies and tours. Proven on numerous events in Europe and America, this striking Packard is sure to provide endless enjoyment for its next owner.

    For sale
    $225,000(£0)
  • 1966 Meyers Manx Dune Buggy

    For sale
    $58,500(£0)

    In the 1960s, the fiberglass kit-car craze was taking hold in America. Versatile and cheap, fiberglass was getting easier for average enthusiasts to use, and custom car builders, racers, and hot rodders began turning to it as a viable alternative to sheet metal. Strong and light, it could be molded into virtually any shape imaginable and reproduced hundreds of times over. As a result, numerous small “cottage” manufacturers sprang up across the United States who offered pre-fabricated fiberglass car bodies that could transform otherwise mundane transport into an exciting and unique sports car. Glasspar was one of the first to hit the market with the G2 and they were later joined by companies such as Devin and Fiberfab who enjoyed quite a bit of success selling kits to adapt exotic bodies a wide variety of American or European chassis. One of the most distinctive and unique kit-car projects came out of the California workshops of Bruce F. Meyers. Mr. Meyers was an engineer, boat builder, artist, tinkerer, surfer and amateur desert racer who would spark a kit-car craze of the 60s. Eschewing the typical sports car designs favored by other kit-car builders, Meyers designed and built a VW-based dune-buggy that was equally at home on the beach, the street, or racing through the desert. Drawing on his boat building experience, the first Meyers dune buggy was built using a dramatically shortened VW Beetle platform fitted with a fiberglass monocoque body and a mix of VW and Chevy truck suspension. He named it “Manx” after the stubby, short-tailed Manx cat. Donor Beetles were cheap, plentiful and could be easily tuned to give the light and nimble Manx astonishing performance both on and off-road. Bruce Meyers’ little buggy made headlines in 1967 when it scored a surprise win at the 1967 Mexican 1000 desert race (the predecessor to the Baja 1000). Sales exploded and soon scores of copies began flooding the market, and the dune buggy craze had taken off. Despite the copycats, the original Meyers Manx remains a cult-classic, and authentic early examples are prized by enthusiasts and collectors alike. This delightful Meyers Manx is a verified original example complete with a certificate of authenticity issued by the Meyers Manx Registry. Presented in classic orange and black with a tan roof and interior, this is fabulous representation of the iconic, quintessential dune buggy. Out of long-term family ownership, this fully restored Manx presents in excellent condition, with very good paintwork both inside and out, and a number of charming period details. It features many original Manx options such as front and rear bumpers, a removable hardtop, and wind wings. The classic raked stance is achieved through “big and little” steel wheels, widened to accommodate 205/70-14 radials up front with fat 225/70-15 radials in the rear. The wheels wear dog dish VW hubcaps and have been beautifully finished in cream to provide a pleasing accent to the orange paint. Power comes from a recently-built 1835 cc “big bore” VW engine that features a counterweight crank, Crane camshaft, CB Performance cylinder heads and dual Solex carburetors. The “go” is given some “show” courtesy of body color engine shrouds, EMPI valve covers and a ceramic coated sports exhaust system. The engine runs strong and emits an addictive bark, sending power through a VW 4-speed transaxle equipped with an EMPI shifter. The joy of any Meyers Manx lies in its simplicity, and this example captures that with its pure, period correct nature. The interior consists of little more than a pair of fixed-back bucket seats trimmed in tan vinyl, and the just the basic controls you need for road use, and nothing else to distract you from the joy of driving. Instrumentation includes the OEM VW speedo cluster, along with VDO secondary gauges and a period correct Sun Super Tach. Driving the Manx is an absolute blast: The engine makes ample power, and the short wheelbase and lively, direct steering give it kart-like responses. This certified original Manx is an outstanding example and whether you’re in a show, on the road or cruising the beach, it is ready to deliver on the Meyers promise of “More Smiles per Mile”.  

    For sale
    $58,500(£0)
  • 1952 Allard J2X

    For sale
    $595,000(£0)

    Of all the cars that would wear the famous red Allard badge, the J2X is perhaps the most recognizable symbol of this storied marque. The J2 series was born in the late 1940s when sports car racing on open-road circuits in America was growing increasingly popular, but there was a noticeable lack of cars available to American buyers. The sports car revolution was just beginning to take hold, and Sydney Allard developed the J2 of 1949 specifically with the needs of American racing drivers in mind. The J2 featured svelte, minimalist bodywork and a robust chassis built to accommodate a variety of cheap and reliable American V8 engines. The J2X of 1951-1954 followed up on the J2’s tremendous success, with an outwardly similar appearance and a few subtle improvements to the chassis. Most notable, the engine was moved forward slightly to give more room in the foot wells which also improved the handling balance. A number of engines could be fitted, but it was the combination of the Allard chassis and Cadillac’s new overhead valve 331 cubic inch V8 that became the stuff of legend – dominating the heady days of early post-war sports car racing at storied tracks from Watkins Glen to Elkhart Lake to Le Mans. Just 71 examples of the J2Xwere ever built but its place is firmly cemented in the annals of motorsport history. We are thrilled to offer this truly outstanding 1952 Allard J2X, chassis number J2X3042. Fully restored and prepped for rally duty, this is a proven and reliable example that benefits from a comprehensive, nut and bolt restoration performed by a highly respected specialist. The earliest history of car #3042 begins at the end of February 1952 when, according to marque experts, it was delivered (less engine) along with its sister car (#3043) to Noel Kirk Motors, the famous Los Angeles Allard dealer. According to the Allard Register there is a gap in the paper records for our subject car, but the build sheet for #3043 indicates preparation for a Cadillac engine, and experts believe that since both cars were shipped at the same time they would have been prepared in the same spec, which was typical practice for Allard. The first owner’s name is unknown, but it was owned by the late Evan Enninger of Downey, California beginning sometime in the 1960s. Mr. Enninger, a former B52 pilot, bought the J2X from his neighbor (allegedly for $35!) but apparently never drove it even once, instead keeping it tucked in his garage for the next 20-plus years. In the 1980s Enninger sold it to a Ferrari dealer in California for $25,000. Photos show the car in complete condition, with its Cadillac engine still in place. It was finished in red livery as original, with wide wheels and aftermarket side pipes. After a light refurbishment the J2X was eventually sold in the early 1990s to two partners from Phoenix, AZ; Dr. Bob Dunne, a neurosurgeon, and Snuff Garrett, a music producer. After buying out his partner, Dr. Dunne entrusted the Allard to the highly respected Jaguar restorer and collector Terry Larson of Arizona for restoration work. It competed in the Copperstate 1000 in 1991, and Dr. Dunne sold it shortly thereafter. In 1997, Andrew Simpson of Texas would purchase J2X3042, eventually handing it over to the renowned Allard specialist John Harden of The Vintage Connection in Oklahoma City. Mr. Simpson was an avid vintage racing enthusiast and he charged Harden’s shop with restoring the Allard true to original specification, while making it a fast and dependable car for touring or track. The restoration of J2X3042 would span 2 ½ years and nearly 2600 hours. The documented process shows the level of consideration given to every facet of the project. After being completely stripped down, each nut and bolt was scrutinized and the car was returned to a very correct state, with subtle improvements made to known J2X weak points that ensure safe and reliable use. The body was repaired as necessary, with special attention paid to the rear section which had been widened early in its life to accommodate fat rear tires. Using Harden’s proprietary jigs built from another J2X, the body was restored to factory original shape. In the time since the restoration was completed, the Allard remains in outstanding condition, with silver finish on the chassis and suspension components and a brilliant red livery with black leather seats. The restoration included a complete rebuild of the Cadillac 331 V8 with mild upgrades for power and reliability. The engine features Stromberg 97 carburetors on an Edelbrock intake, Stellite valve seats, adjustable pushrods, Vertex magneto and a lightweight alloy flywheel. It is backed by a Richmond T-10 4-speed gearbox, sending power to the rebuilt original rear axle with limited slip diff. A forward-braced bolt-in roll bar is included that can be fitted for race duty or easily removed for show and street. Shortly after the $285,000 restoration was finished in 2005, Mr. Simpson parted with the J2X, when it passed to the hands of its current owners. While in their stewardship, J2X3042 has been driven and enjoyed to the fullest. It has taken part in no fewer than ten Colorado Grands and successfully completed every one without a mechanical failure. The car is very well-known among Grand participants and it was depicted on the poster and route book cover of the 2010 event. It has been maintained in top mechanical and cosmetic condition and presents beautifully, showing few signs of the regular enjoyment it sees on the road and in rallies. The red paintwork has been protected with clear film in key areas and remains in excellent order. Bodywork is straight and tidy, detailed with a bonnet strap, correct Allard windscreens, and the J2X’s signature dual sidemount spares. The black leather displays an inviting care-worn patina from use, with the high side-bolsters exhibiting some creasing and fading that adds a welcome character to the interior, revealing this as a car that’s meant to be driven. The lightweight body and sublime chassis combine with the heavy-hitting Cadillac OHV V8 engine to make driving this Allard a truly thrilling experience. Despite the impressive power-to-weight ratio, the car remains very well balanced and enjoyable without ever feeling like it wants to bite. It is a very finely sorted car that is ideally suited for countless events worldwide. With the added benefit of its bolt-in roll bar and integrated fire system, it is suitable for vintage track events as well, and would certainly make a welcome addition to the VSCCA ranks. Just 61 examples of this iconic Anglo-American racer are known to exist and are highly prized by their owners, making this a truly rare opportunity. This fabulous Allard J2X is a beautiful and iconic racing machine, and is one of most proven and best-sorted examples known.

    For sale
    $595,000(£0)
  • 1968 Toyota FJ40 Land Cruiser

    For sale
    $79,500(£0)

    The Toyota Land Cruiser is a vehicle that practically defines dependability. Since their inception in the 1950s, Toyota’s storied off-roaders have been proven in some of the harshest conditions imaginable, and over the course of six decades, the Land Cruiser name has become a benchmark for reliability. It likely comes as little surprise to learn that the concept for the Land Cruiser was inspired by the American Jeep. In 1950, the US Government commissioned Toyota to build 100 Willys Jeeps for use by the Military Police during the Korean War. Toyota obliged but immediately saw room for improvement on the old American design. In 1951 Toyota developed their own prototype which drew on the best the Jeep had to offer but with numerous improvements and refinements. Production of the “Toyota Jeep BJ” began in 1953 and the vehicle was put into service primarily for police and military use. In 1954, the civilian version gained the Land Cruiser name, becoming a welcome tool for farming, construction, industry, or anywhere else a rugged all-purpose truck was needed to traverse difficult terrain. In 1960, the 40-series Land Cruiser was unveiled with all-new body styling, an improved chassis and new engine options including gasoline and diesel power. The 40-series and its derivatives remained in regular production for 24 years, earning its place as a legend for its unbreakable nature as much as its tough-guy good looks. In the 3+ decades since production of the 40 series ended, these trucks remain highly collectible and have spawned an entire sub-culture within the classic car world. The FJ40 is simply one of the greatest vehicles of all time. We are pleased to offer this truly outstanding, exquisitely restored 1968 Land Cruiser FJ40 Hardtop. Subject of a ground up, nut-and-bolt restoration performed by marque experts, this FJ features several subtle upgrades to improve the driving experience. Finished in Heath Gray (Toyota code 113) with a white roof, the paint quality is outstanding, detailed to factory-fresh standards, with a look that is very authentic without appearing over-restored. Period accessories include rubber bumper guards and original fog lamps. Panel fit is consistent and factory appropriate. As with most FJ40s, the hard top can be removed, and the body features the split tailgate with swing-out rear doors. It rides on painted steel wheels with polished stainless early-type dog-dish hubcaps. The wheels wear aggressive Firestone Super All Traction tires that give a vintage look but are upsized slightly to fill the wheel wells and provide a bit more clearance should you decide to hit the trails. The chassis has been fully restored to a similarly high standard as the body. Suspension has been fully rebuilt, giving a very slight lift to allow for the larger tires. The frame and major components have been painted or powder coated with the same fastidious care given to the body and it remains in very clean and tidy condition, showing only minimal use. The stout and torquey F145 3.9 liter inline six runs strong, starting readily and sending power through the original-type 3-speed manual gearbox. The engine is pleasingly detailed with appropriate hardware and fittings, while the only obvious deviation from stock is the addition of the A/C compressor which has been integrated and plumbed to give a factory-look. Another welcome upgrade comes in the form of a discreet electric power steering system with an adjustable assist feature that is adjusted via a dash mounted rheostat. The finely restored interior retains the original FJ’s purity and simplicity, but with subtle upgrades that include custom tailored floor coverings and an under-dash A/C unit. The front 60/40 bench seat and twin rear jump-seats are trimmed in high quality charcoal upholstery as original. Period touches include a solid-state radio, correct rear hatch stays, OEM switches and original steering wheel. The restored original jack is in place in the under-seat storage box while the jack handle and tire tools are fitted in the rear compartment as correct. This FJ40 is an outstanding example in attractive colors that captures the essence of what makes these trucks so desirable, while affording the driver some welcome improvements to comfort and drivability without sacrificing the purity of the original design. Still fresh from its 2017 restoration, it is ready to serve as a loyal companion exploring trails, on fishing excursions, or simply for casual trips around town.

    For sale
    $79,500(£0)
  • 1969 Mercedes-Benz 280SE Cabriolet

    For sale
    $198,500(£0)

    Mercedes-Benz introduced the W111 in 1959 as a broadly-applied platform that would serve as a replacement for both the bread-and-butter Ponton sedans as well as the complex and expensive Adenauer coupes and sedans. The versatile chassis architecture formed the basis of everything from four-cylinder diesel taxicabs to luxurious, air-suspended six-cylinder limousines. In 1961, the be-finned “Heckflosse” sedans were joined by the elegantly styled two-door coupe and cabriolet. The sedan’s upright styling with somewhat awkward tail fins was a blatant appeal to the American market, while the coupe and cabriolet featured more modern, more subdued style that was considerably more timeless in appearance. The revised styling of the two-door cars was so well received that it would inspire the Heckflosse’s replacement, the W108 of 1965. The two-door W111 would outlive its finned four-door counterpart by several years, continuing production through 1971. Handsome and luxurious, these were the last truly hand-built Mercedes-Benz cars, assembled with great care by the expert staff at Mercedes’ storied Sindelfingen works. The glamorous cabriolet and its elegant coupe sibling offered luxury paired with exceptional build quality; a Teutonic counterpoint to the opulent Rolls-Royce Corniche. A wide variety of engines would feature in the W111 but the flagship coupe and cabriolet were limited mainly to the refined and powerful inline six-cylinder petrol engines, with an all-aluminum 3.5 liter V8 joining the range late in production. When equipped with the 2.8 liter Bosch-injected inline six, the 280SE is a massively capable car; luxurious and comfortable with continent-crushing high-speed ability. In recent years, the 280 SE has become one of the most desirable of all post-war Mercedes cars this side of the 300SL. Collectors have taken notice, and these fine cars are cherished for their rarity, quality, style and performance. Benefitting from a recent high-quality restoration, this 1969 280 SE Cabriolet is an impeccably presented example of Mercedes’ definitive luxury grand touring car. One of just 1,390 open-topped 280 SEs built over a four year run, this car is finished in its original and elegant color combination of Sand Beige (DB 467) over Dark Brown leather (248) with a complementary brown canvas soft top. The bare metal rotisserie restoration, performed between 2009 and 2011, is beautifully finished with outstanding paint quality and crisp, straight panels displaying excellent alignment and gaps. As part of the restoration, the extensive chrome and bright work was removed and fully restored, Fit and finish is exquisite, as one should expect from a properly restored 280 SE. It rides on factory original steel wheels with color-keyed full wheel covers, shod with Michelin narrow-band whitewall tires as is correct for the period. In addition to the body, the interior has been fully restored with the upholstery, wood trim and brightwork finished to a high standard. An original high-spec US market car, it is equipped with numerous desirable options that include electric windows, Frigiking air conditioning, dual front arm rests and a Becker Grand Prix AM/FM radio with automatic aerial. The dark brown leather trim is beautiful; handsomely complementing the paint color and finished with factory-correct grain and patterns. The seats, carpets and interior panels show virtually no use since the restoration, the leather appearing hardly broken in. The soft top has been fully restored to include the insulated headlining as original, which helps keep wind noise at a minimum when motoring with the top up, and a brown leather top boot to keep things tidy with the roof down. The trunk is correctly finished in satin black, and an original first-aid kit, owner’s manual and a rare factory tool kit are included. Underhood presentation of the 2.8 liter Bosch fuel-injected inline six is excellent and up to the standard set by the rest of the car. Records indicate the engine was rebuilt at considerable cost as part of the restoration, and was fully detailed prior to its reinstallation. Notable details include the gold-cad plated brackets and fuel pipes, firewall insulation pad, and white-case Mercedes-Benz battery. The impressive appearance of the engine bay is backed by strong performance and exemplary road manners. These wonderful cars bridge the modern-era Mercedes with the classic, hand-crafted models of the 1950s and 60s. Beyond their historical place in Stuttgart lore, they are simply outstanding automobiles to drive and own, cherished by collectors and marque enthusiasts. This fine example is ready for its next owner to cherish and enjoy covering effortless miles in high style.

    For sale
    $198,500(£0)
  • 1971 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 NART Spyder

    For sale
    $995,000(£0)

    Luigi Chinetti was a tough and gritty racing driver who gave Enzo Ferrari his first of many victories at Le Mans behind the wheel of a 166 MM Barchetta. As a reward for his efforts, Enzo put Luigi in charge of establishing Ferrari’s business in the critically important American marketplace. A shrewd and intelligent businessman, Chinetti transformed Ferrari from an esoteric curiosity into a household name in America. Through his dealership in New York and later Greenwich, Connecticut as well as his successful North American Racing Team (NART), Chinetti was a highly influential voice in Enzo’s inner circle. Along with his son, Luigi “Coco” Jr., Chinetti Motors would be instrumental in several limited production factory models such as the 275GTS/4 NART Spyder, and its successor, the 365 GTS/4 Daytona Spyder. The Chinettis were also prolific consumers of one-off and limited production coachbuilt Ferraris. They ordered a number of special road and racing cars through various coachbuilders and were responsible for most of the limited number of coachbuilt Daytonas in existence. In 1974, Chinetti partnered with Giovanni Michelotti to produce a car that would serve as NART’s next Le Mans entry. Based on a standard road car, it was upgraded to Group 4 specs and Michelotti, famous for his crisp and linear style, penned an arresting wedge-shaped, targa-top body which was based on an earlier Geneva show car. The curious racing car was finished in a colorful livery with a vivid, and fully trimmed blue leather interior. Entered at Le Mans and Daytona, it would never take the track in anger, but the shape inspired Chinetti Motors to commission several more similar cars based on the unique racer. Our featured car, S/N 14299, is the first of three road-going NART Daytona Spyders; a very special car that was personally commissioned by Luigi as a gift for his wife Marion. The story of 14299 begins in 1971 when it was delivered as a standard road-going 365 GTB/4 Daytona to Dr. Silva via Chinetti’s Greenwich, CT showroom. The car was used sparingly and, in 1975 it returned to Chinetti motors, presumably on a trade. Rather than turn around and re-sell the car, Luigi Sr. kept it and, along with two other Daytonas, shipped it to the workshops of Giovanni Michelotti to be rebodied with the uniquely angular and sharp style inspired by the NART Le Mans car. The three NART Daytonas were crafted using the same wooden buck, though each was unique in trim and details. The body, constructed of aluminum and fiberglass, was quite fresh and modern for the time, with faired-in bumpers, sculpted sills, subtly cut down doors and a distinct wedge profile that was de rigueur for the 1970s. It is a unique and striking shape; balanced and aggressive yet unmistakably Ferrari, despite the fact that very few original fittings remain. Mechanically, the NART Spyder used the original Daytona engine, gearbox and chassis, with the lightweight body enhancing performance. Fresh in its new coachwork, S/N 14299 was presented to Marion Chinetti in 1977 finished in an attractive combination of dark blue with lighter blue sills and bumpers, accented by a rich arancia leather cabin, a livery which it retains today. She would use the Ferrari for only a brief period of time, amassing fewer than 1500 miles while in her tenure. In 1980, the still fresh design was shown on the Michelotti stand at the Torino Motor Show, and immediately afterward was loaned to the Musée des 24 Heures du Mans where it remained on exhibit through 1982, the same year of Mrs. Chinetti’s passing. In 1985, it was acquired by a Los Angeles classic car dealer Marty Yacobian who kept the car in his personal collection before it was acquired by another well-known dealer and collector, Marv Tonkin of Portland, OR. In 1991, Mrs. Chinetti’s Michelotti Daytona joined the renowned Jon Shirley Collection in Washington, where it remained a proud fixture among multiple important Ferraris for the next twenty-two years. In 2009, the Daytona earned its Ferrari Classiche “White Book” authentication for Ferraris of historical importance. Mr. Shirley sold 14299 in 2013, and it has remained with just one other collector since. Today, the car presents in exceptional and highly original condition, with a light patina acquired from the years of limited and careful use. The striking metallic blue paintwork presents quite well. While showing its age in places, it remains very attractive for what is essentially an unrestored car. Build quality of the Michelotti body is excellent and the car wears many of its original fittings, including the period Cibie Iode fog lamps, ANSA exhaust, Michelotti badging and hard top. The “Marion” script on the doors and large NART insignia on the boot lid remain, as originally presented to Mrs. Chinetti in 1977. Michelotti fully reworked the standard Daytona interior with a bespoke dash and unique seats, incorporating factory instruments and switchgear into the new design. The tan leather cabin is in outstanding original condition, remaining totally stock apart from the fitment of an aftermarket radio. This a fully functioning, coachbuilt car featuring electric windows, air conditioning, and a properly fitted soft top. The beautiful Arancia tan leather is accented with brown carpets, brown leather instrument clusters, and a fat-rimmed Momo steering wheel. Mechanically, the NART Daytona remains in excellent condition. It runs strong and feels even more aggressive than a standard car – perhaps due to the lighter coachwork. While the total mileage on the chassis is unknown, it has seen only limited use in the years since its conversion, and it feels tight and solid as only the best low-mileage cars do. According to the Ferrari Classiche report, s/n 14299 retains its original engine and sextet of Weber 40 DCN 21 carburetors. The engine is very well detailed and presented in tidy original condition. As expected of a properly preserved Ferrari, it retains the original tool kit as well as the jack bag with jack and wheel tools. Period correct Michelin XWX tires are fitted to magnesium alloy Cromodora knock-off wheels which are a later addition that better suit the angular, futuristic Michelotti lines. Otherwise, s/n 14299 remains as it was when gifted to Marion Chinetti over 40 years ago. This very special Ferrari has a fascinating history with a handful of owners who have each worked to preserve this outstanding piece of marque history. It is a magnificent example of the ultra-rare coachbuilt Daytona and a fabulous expression of advanced 1970s Italian design courtesy of the great Michelotti.

    For sale
    $995,000(£0)
  • 1957 Studebaker Golden Hawk

    For sale
    $79,500(£0)

    In 1953, Studebaker unveiled the sleek and stylish Champion/Commander Starliner hardtops and coupes. The striking and futuristic design looked fast standing still though the family of somewhat anemic inline six-cylinder engines meant performance didn’t always live up to the promises made by the bodywork. For the 1956 model year, Studebaker lacked the budget to develop a new car from scratch so the Commander and Champ were heavily reworked by the team at Raymond Loewy Studios. A bold new grille mimicked the intake of an F-86 Sabre jet fighter, making room for the big 352 cubic inch Packard OHV V8 engine which finally gave the svelte Studebakers performance to match their looks. Touted as the “Family Sports Car”, the new Golden Hawk was one of the most unique cars of the era. Packard’s big 352 cubic inch V8 gave the Golden Hawk impressive straight line performance, but it was also quite heavy and the enormous weight over the front axle gave translated into questionable handling characteristics. For the 1956 model year, Packard’s 352 was superseded by the significantly lighter Studebaker-designed 289 cubic inch V8. On paper this might seem like a downgrade, but the addition of a belt-driven McCullough supercharger allowed the 289 to punch out a very stout 275 horsepower and 333 lb. - ft. of torque. Over 100 pounds were shed from over the front axle, making the four-seat Golden Hawk surprisingly fast. It could easily outperform both the Ford Thunderbird and Chevrolet Corvette in a straight line, and now had vastly improved handling to hang with its two-seat rivals on twisty roads. The body retained the old roofline of the Starliner, but was brought in vogue with fiberglass fins (to the disdain of Robert Bourke, the Starliner’s designer), a hood bulge to clear the blower, and unique trunk lid with a fluted rear panel. The Golden Hawk proved to be one most powerful American GT cars of the era, made even more impressive by the shoestring budget under which it was developed, and today is counted among the most desirable and collectible of all Studebakers. This striking 1957 Studebaker Golden Hawk is a wonderful example wearing a finely-preserved older restoration. Recently out of 14 years in a large and diverse collection of sports cars, this Studebaker was originally a long-term California car documented via old registration slips and a UC Davis parking sticker from 1964. Looking sharp and attractive in Artic White with Tiara Gold inserts, optional dual rear antennas, dual exhaust and tinted glass, this is an outstanding car with a superb presentation. The handsome body is very straight with consistent panel gaps and doors that shut with satisfying solidity. Paintwork is highly attractive, having been well-maintained since the restoration was completed. It shows only a few minor touch-ups upon close inspection. Chrome and stainless brightwork is in beautiful condition overall, with a mix of restored and preserved original pieces. The bumpers feature excellent plating, and the stainless side moldings and window trims are straight and properly aligned, with only the belt line moldings and the original mirror shows some minor pitting. Like the Starliner before it, the Golden Hawk is rakish and low; this car sitting properly on Tiara Gold steel wheels with original stainless hubcaps and fresh Firestone Deluxe Champion wide-whitewall tires. A rare and desirable gold interior presents in excellent condition with restored seats complementing preserved original two-tone door and interior panels. The original radio remains in place and the fittings and controls all appear to be excellent originals. Carpets are correct gold nylon loop and the trunk is properly detailed, housing the spare wheel and jack. The spacious and comfortable interior gave the Golden Hawk an advantage over the competition, allowing room for five while appealing to the sporting driver with its purposeful race-inspired gauges and engine-turned alloy fascia. The McCullough Supercharged 289 cubic inch V8 is tidy and well detailed, with correct air cleaner fittings and hardware. It is clean and appears well sorted without being fussy or over-restored. The undercarriage is similarly tidy, appearing very correct and showing minimal road use. The engine runs strong and the car is simply a pleasure to drive; the abundant power and low-end torque from that blown V8 lending it an impressive turn of speed. With unique Jet-Age style and the grunt to back it up, this Golden Hawk certainly lives up to the “Family Sports Car” moniker its creators gave it. This is a very fine example of Studebaker’s legendary Golden Hawk, a fabulous driver that is ready for events or casual show.

    For sale
    $79,500(£0)
  • 1959 Abarth 750 Zagato Double Bubble

    For sale
    $99,500(£0)

    In the 1950s, Fiat’s small, humble and rugged automobiles helped put Italy - and much of the rest of Europe - back on wheels. Fiats of the post war period were excellent basic transportation, and while the company had an illustrious record in motorsports prior to WWII, they were long done with factory supported racing. But in 1952, the Austrian-born Italian transplant Carlo (née Karl) Abarth came along to unlock the hidden potential within those tiny Fiats. A skilled engineer and former European championship-winning motorbike sidecar racer, Abarth offered tuning kits before moving on to modified production cars and eventually his own, bespoke racing machines. Carlo Abarth would work his magic on numerous cars throughout his career including Lancia, Simca and even Porsche, but it is the relationship with Fiat that cemented his firm’s reputation and brought them the overwhelming majority of their competition success. 1956 witnessed the introduction of the Fiat 600-based Abarth 750. Built to contest the highly competitive 750 cc classes at events like the Mille Miglia and Targa Florio, Abarth used the basic 600 chassis and suspension architecture, but essentially scrapped everything else in the name of lightness and power. Fiat’s four-cylinder water-cooled engine was punched out to 767 cc and upgraded with new intake, a reworked cylinder head, and free flowing exhaust. Oil capacity was increased via a larger sump which served to keep things cool and prevent starvation during hard cornering. Different coachbuilders were contracted to build bodies, but it is the work of Zagato that is most often associated with the classic Abarths of the 1950s and 1960s. Zagato’s rounded shape helped cheat the wind, and the roof featured a pair of humps to allow a bit of extra head room for helmeted drivers - earning the car the nickname “Double-Bubble”. The rear engine lid featured twin scoops that mimicked the roofline and fed additional cooling air to the engine at speed. Light weight and devastatingly effective, the Abarth 750 Zagato satisfied Carlo Abarth’s expectation for a smallbore G.T. car that could not only dominate its own class, but run at the sharp end of the field against cars twice its capacity. This 1959 Fiat Abarth 750 Zagato is a proven and wonderfully-presented example of the desirable, pint-sized racer for the road. It is in excellent condition throughout, benefitting from sympathetic restoration work and expert care. This car, chassis number 558327, was built in road-going trim and is equipped with bumperettes front and rear, as well as a smattering of additional trim to thinly disguise its purposeful, race-bred roots. The Zagato-built coachwork is in excellent condition; the alloy panels being very straight and clean, and exhibiting very good fit. The bright red paintwork shows in fine order throughout, having mellowed slightly since its restoration. Other features include covered headlamps, correct wheels with chrome hubcaps, and badges that proudly proclaim Abarth’s past success in 750 Gran Turismo racing. The signature Italian pushbutton handles open the featherweight door to reveal a surprisingly spacious interior that belies the tiny outside proportions. Taller drivers will appreciate Zagato’s signature roofline as well as the rear-engine layout that affords plenty of leg room. The seats are trimmed in biscuit tan leather with black piping, along with black carpeting and tan panels. The interior was refreshed in approximately 2004 and it remains in excellent condition today, the seats having just taken on a broken-in character that suits the car well. For road rally duty, a roll bar has been integrated behind the seats. The dash features a full complement of original Jaeger gauges and the wood-rimmed, period Nardi wheel has been refinished to a high standard. While the interior certainly feels special on its own, the excitement really comes once the gutsy little four-cylinder engine is fired up. This car is powered by a later 903 c.c. 850-series engine, but it retains many important and correct Abarth components such as twin 34-mm exhausts and the high-capacity finned-alloy sump. Fiat were masters of efficient packaging, and while the tiny engine bay is tight, all major components are surprisingly easy to access for service and the engine on this example is very well presented with correct fittings and hardware. The lively little engine runs strong and this car has proven itself on events such as the challenging California Mille in 2010. Paired with that wonderful engine is a sublime chassis with delicate steering, four wheel independent suspension and powerful drum brakes. Tipping the scales at just 1180 pounds, the Abarth 750 Zagato is a true featherweight. Small but mighty, the Double Bubble Abarth can easily hang with Porsche 356s and Alfa Romeos of twice its displacement – and there is no shortage of drivers who have experienced the surprise of being passed by one! While there is no doubt that this Abarth 750 Zagato is a desirable collector piece, it is also one of the most charming and enthralling driver’s cars of the era. Sure to bring great pleasure to its next owner, this wonderfully presented example is eligible for numerous rallies, tours and track events worldwide.

    For sale
    $99,500(£0)
  • 1939 Lagonda LG6 Rapide

    For sale
    $985,000(£0)

    In 1935, Lagonda had its back against the wall. With all of the press and prestige that came with the M45’s surprise victory at the LeMans 24 hour race, not enough buyers were stepping up and the firm was facing receivership. Management had brought in 29 year old Alan P. Good, a financial wizard who amassed enough investors to save the firm. Good, along with recent arrival W.O. Bentley were motivated to build the finest cars in the world. Bentley had recently lost control of his own firm to Rolls-Royce, and was given a menial title and treated as a glorified test driver, so he was eager to utilize his engineering skills and attempt to humble the bosses at Rolls-Royce. He set to work at Lagonda designing an all-new and highly advanced V12 engine that would go head-to-head with the new Rolls-Royce Phantom III. The Lagonda V12 was a marvel of technical sophistication – powerful and turbine smooth, yet also notoriously complex and expensive. It is said that even an experienced Lagonda engineer required a full 18 hours to dismantle the V12, and that’s with all the special tools at hand. Alongside the new V12, Lagonda continued to refine their Meadows-supplied 4.5 liter inline six that had been in service since 1933, powering the M45 and LG45 as well Invicta’s 4.5 and others. Given the complexity and development time required of the twelve, it was wise to offer the Meadows six alongside as an alternative power plant. While it may seem like “half the engine” of its V12 counterpart, the six was surprisingly similar in many ways – 4479 cc for the V12 and 4453 cc for the six – with output equally similar, the twelve making 160 horsepower to the six’s 140. Many of the improvements for the Sanction 4 Meadows engine were courtesy of Harry Weslake – the great engineer who would design numerous Grand Prix and sports car race-winning engines. The uprated Meadows engine was soon mated with the advanced chassis of the V12 model to form a sporting car that would be considered Lagonda’s ultimate six-cylinder model: The LG6 Rapide. We are honored to offer chassis number 12358 – one of just six LG6 Rapide Dropheads built. This magnificent automobile features four-place drophead coupe coachwork, designed in-house by the great Frank Feeley. According to the accompanying original registration logbook, it was first registered “DFG 800” on June 14, 1939 to Lieutenant-Colonel Michael Lindsay. Lt. Col. Lindsay would own this car until 1953 and it is said that he drove the car as the name implies, and thoroughly enjoyed every moment of it. This LG6 would have been one of the fastest cars of its day, and Lindsay would recall many years later that he was only passed once in 14 years behind the wheel of DFG 800! As he would recall to Bernd Holthusen in the 1980s his exploits were mostly trouble free, though in 1940 while traveling the motorway at 100 mph speeds, he cooked the original engine, prompting installation of a replacement engine. The LG6 would pass to Mr. Patrick Alexander R. Lindsay from 1953-1960, then to James Dutton Knight of Rolled Steel Products from 1960-1964. It then found a long-term owner in Michael Edward Malone who cared for the Rapide from 1964-1984. In 1984, 12358 was acquired by noted Lagonda collector, enthusiast and marque expert Bernd Holthusen of Germany. It was upon his acquisition of the car in 1984 that he spoke with then-General Michael Lindsay who recounted tales of his high-speed adventures and how much he enjoyed his time with this very special car. In the 1990s, Holthusen determined the car was due for restoration. He felt it was so attractive in its apple gray over green hides and hood that it was decided the car should stay in the original colors. In 1999, the Meadows six was meticulously rebuilt and carefully upgraded using techniques learned on similar cars in Mr. Holthusen’s impressive collection. Improvements include a balanced rotating assembly and hardened valve seats for sustained high-speed runs on unleaded petrol, a water pump with modern ceramic bearings and seals, and the axles have been updated to use modern-type lip seals. Mr. Holthusen used the Lagonda extensively during his tenure, touring around Europe and enjoying the car to the fullest. It was also featured in his foremost book on the marque titled “Lagonda” which was published in 1996. Mr. Holthusen parted with his impeccably restored LG6 Rapide in 2002, and it eventually found its way to yet another respected collection of cars from this storied make. The current American owner continued to thoroughly enjoy DFG 800 on numerous tours, rallies and concours, including the Colorado Grand in 2017. Today, this magnificent automobile presents in excellent condition, its outstanding restoration having taken on light and pleasing character thanks to regular use on road events. The sumptuous Frank Feeley-penned coachwork features flowing curves punctuated with a subtle chrome sweep on the body and brilliantly judged cutaway wheel spats. Ace wheel discs and big P100 headlamps add to the sporting appeal. The paintwork has held up remarkably well since the restoration, showing only a few minor marks from use, but remaining glossy, straight and handsome. Original literature touts this as a four passenger car (three up front, one in back) however it would be best enjoyed with two or three as the side-facing dicky seat is suitable for short trips. The dark green leather has a handsome patina from regular use, lightly creased, inviting and perfectly broken in. Lagonda-badged instruments are as-original, and this car features a fabulous period correct Phillips radio. The tool kit is neatly hidden behind a drop-down panel, and a set of period appropriate suitcases fit behind the front seat, given the boot is all but consumed by the spare wheel. Originally rated for 140 horsepower, the improvements during the rebuild have likely released a few extra ponies, and as expected, the LG6 runs phenomenally well. The engine features original twin Scintilla Vertex magnetos, and dual S.U. carburetors and is properly presented and detailed, showing extremely well for a car that has been proven on numerous events. The original four-speed gearbox has the top three ratios synchronized which mates to a 3.31 rear axle to allow for effortless high-speed cruising. The chassis has been maintained to a high standard, and the handling and road manners remain impeccable. The sale will include the original owner’s handbook, tools, period luggage, original registration booklet, and Meadow’s instruction manual. As one of just six dropheads built on the LG6 chassis, this fabulous automobile has led a charmed life at the hands of passionate, enthusiastic owners. From the day it was delivered, DFG 800 has been enjoyed to the fullest. Its most recent keeper has ensured it remains on the button and ready for action on tours, rallies and club events, while also kept beautiful enough for concours display. This is an exceptional opportunity to acquire one of the finest prepared examples of this legendary pre-war Grand Touring car.

    For sale
    $985,000(£0)
  • 1912 Hudson Model 33 Mile A Minute Speedster

    For sale
    $189,500(£0)

    Nearly as quickly as the automobile evolved, speed contests evolved alongside. Organized races between steam vehicles happened in as early as the 1880s, with events for internal combustion-powered machines following suit by the 1890s. At the turn of the 20th century, automobile racing was a full-fledged sport and manufacturers were constructing purpose-built machines to contest grueling cross-country events. As racing grew in popularity, more and more manufacturers saw the marketing value in building ready-to-race sports cars. In America, where closed circuit racing was hugely popular, manufacturers like Stutz and Mercer began to offer “off the shelf” racing cars which could be readily stripped of fenders and lights, raced hard, then reassembled and driven home. Between 1910 and 1914, the Mercer Raceabout and Stutz Bearcat earned legendary status for their on-road performance and illustrious racing careers. In an effort to get in on this prestigious market, other manufacturers soon followed with their own race-replicas. One such company was Hudson, who in 1912, offered the Mile-A-Minute Speed Roadster atop the robust and powerful Model 33 chassis. The Model 33 was introduced in 1911, in only the 2nd year of Hudson production. This entirely new model is widely considered the first true “ground-up” Hudson. The four-cylinder engine was designed by the engineering genius Howard E. Coffin and built by Continental. It displaced 226 cubic inches and featured opposing valves and a unique oil filled cork-faced clutch which allowed for exceptionally smooth operation. For 1912, the smaller Model 20 was dropped and the Model 33 was the sole offering from Hudson. To the usual lineup of touring car, limousine and coupe bodies, Hudson added the racy “Mile-A-Minute” Sport Roadster. Spartan and purposeful, the Mile a Minute offered guaranteed 60mph performance – with period adverts claiming it was “faster than its name implies”. This racer for the road followed the formula of Mercer and Stutz, with two exposed seats, a monocle windscreen, and mudguard-style fenders. Fenders, lights and valances were easily removed for racing, the seats and steering column were lowered, and a large fuel/oil tank was fitted behind the seats. The light body combined with Hudson’s powerful engine returned truly exciting performance for the era. It was also a tremendous value; at a list price of $1,600 the Mile a Minute Sport Roadster was nearly $1,000 cheaper than a similar Mercer Raceabout. This 1912 Mile a Minute Sport Roadster is a wonderful example of the rare and exciting veteran Hudson road-racer. This car has a long history in the Vancouver, B.C. area, where it was discovered in the 1960s by a famous local enthusiast named Buck Rogers. Buck was a pioneer of the antique car hobby in the area, and he formed the Vintage Car Club of Canada in 1957. He was well-known for unearthing rare and significant cars throughout British Columbia. When Rogers first saw the Hudson 33, he recognized this car as an important and unusual Mile a Minute roadster. As found, it was in a fairly derelict state, but the engine and running gear were intact, and Rogers was able to acquire the car and bring it home. Rogers soon sold the Hudson to another prominent Vancouver enthusiast, Jack Halladay, who restored it using a replacement Model 33 chassis. The blue painted roadster was well known among club members and it participated in numerous tours over the years. Following Jack Halladay’s passing, the car was sold to Jack Sheperd in 1989. Sheperd was an avid collector and a perfectionist when it came to his cars. To meet his meticulous standers, he commissioned a comprehensive restoration to return the car to factory correct, Mile-a-Minute Roadster specification. To ensure accuracy of the restoration, Sheperd located a proven and genuine example (an ex-Harrah collection car owned by Dick Deluna) to use as a reference to ensure his speedster was restored to factory original specification, with the correct lowered steering angle, set back engine and additional chassis bracing that were unique to the Mile a Minute. Sadly, before the restoration was completed, Mr. Sheperd passed away and the car was left to the Vancouver Vintage Car Club. Fred Grey, a club member and enthusiastic restorer acquired the car in 2013, taking over the project and exercising great care to ensure the car was completed to the correct standard possible. Great care was given to sourcing the special Model 33 speedster parts such as the Bosch DU4 magneto. The correct 24” wooden spoke wheels (touring cars and others used 25”) had to be custom made by respected expert Anderson Propeller. Today, the Hudson 33 Mile a Minute roadster presents in wonderful condition, in a vivid period appropriate yellow paint scheme with lots of beautifully polished brass fixtures. The serial number, 23046 (engine no. KK12295), designates it as the 46th Speedster built, though it is believed that only a dozen or so remain today. The paintwork is in excellent condition, with correct button-tufted leather upholstery on the sparse bucket seats. Correct details abound such as the circular trunk that also doubles as a spare wheel carrier, accessory manual oil pump, Castle headlamps (discreetly converted to run LED bulbs) and E&J cowl lamps. The big four-cylinder runs well and thanks to the lightweight bodywork, the performance lives up to its evocative name. This Model 33 Sport Roadster is a charming and historically important early speedster that benefits from a careful and authentic restoration. Exciting to drive even at less than “Mile a Minute” speeds, this beautifully presented and exceedingly rare Hudson is ready for enjoyment on tours, rallies or out on the open road.

    For sale
    $189,500(£0)
  • 1965 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III MPW Drophead

    For sale
    $425,000(£0)

    By the time the Silver Cloud series debuted in the late 1950s, Rolls-Royce had fully embraced the idea of mass production – at least in a Rolls-Royce sense of “mass” production – in an effort to remain competitive in an increasingly tight marketplace. The Silver Cloud Standard Steel Saloon was penned in-house by J.P. Blatchley; a modernized yet timeless interpretation of the classic, swooping Silver Dawn that preceded it. The factory body proved to be very popular with buyers, and remained in production with only minor changes for over a decade. But despite declining demand, Rolls-Royce still enlisted the services of outside and in-house coachbuilders. The Silver Cloud’s robust full ladder frame gave coachbuilders an outstanding platform on which to practice their craft. The legendary British coachbuilding firms of Hooper, James Young and Freestone & Webb all worked with the Silver Cloud chassis. In addition, H.J. Mulliner and Park Ward – who were now under the auspices of Rolls-Royce - each produced their own series of special-bodied Clouds offered via official dealers, much in the spirit of the “custom catalog” days of the pre-war era. After the introduction of the V8-powered Silver Cloud II, Rolls-Royce had consolidated operations, combining H.J. Mulliner and Park Ward into H.J. Mullner, Park Ward, Ltd. The beautiful creations would continue, including the popular Drophead Coupe based on a modified Standard Steel Saloon. For clients wishing for a bit more exclusivity and modern style, Mulliner Park Ward offer Design 2045; a stunning, slab-sided fixed head and drophead coupe first built on a Bentley Continental chassis and later adapted for Rolls-Royce. Design 2045 was drawn by a young Norwegian named Vilhelm Koren, who managed to deftly retain the signature elegance of Rolls-Royce while giving the car a fresh, modern and exciting look. The slab sides and laser-straight beltline were a drastic departure from Rolls-Royce’s traditionally baroque curves and swages, though it would go on to inspire the works stylists in the design of the Silver Shadow in the late 1960s. Of the 7,372 Silver Clouds produced, just 101 would wear Design 2045, with 52 of those originally delivered in left hand drive. This 1965 Silver Cloud III H.J. Mulliner Park Ward Drophead is a truly exquisite example of the breed in every respect, and is one of the finest of its kind we have ever encountered. According to the factory chassis card, this original US specification left-drive car, chassis number LCSC 35C, left the works at Crewe in August of 1965 making the short trip to H.J. Mulliner Park Ward to receive its coachwork. Three months later, it was despatched to the legendary import car dealer Charles H. Hornburg Jr. Motor Cars of California and delivered to Kurt R. Strand of Beverly Hills. Mr. Strand specified the handsome color combination of Dawn Blue over Buff leather with a blue power operated hood. Other options include Dunlop whitewall tires, luggage straps, electric door windows, a power-operated Hirschmann antenna and Sundym glass. We can only imagine just how crisp and elegant Mr. Strand’s Rolls-Royce would have looked cruising Wilshire Boulevard in 1965. Following a sympathetic restoration to its original specification, this magnificent Rolls-Royce presents in truly impeccable condition inside and out. Finished as original in the handsome shade of Dawn Blue, the body and paintwork are exceptionally straight with precise and consistent panel fitment. The brightwork has been restored to a similarly high standard, presenting in very fine condition both inside and out. The body also features the optional chrome side trim which adds a subtle highlight to the clean and uncluttered design. The big doors of this Silver Cloud open and shut effortlessly, and occupants are treated to an expertly restored interior trimmed in acres of tan Connolly hides. Beautifully finished to a very high standard, the interior is in exquisite order throughout. Dark blue Wilton wool carpets provide a lovely complement to the tan leather, and blonde-colored woodwork has been fully restored along with the soft trim; retaining its original book-matched veneers on the dash, door caps and front tray. The dark blue Stayfast canvas hood is fully lined in broadcloth as original, which provides some additional insulation and comfort when motoring with the roof in place. The hood is power operated as originally equipped and the fit is taut and crease-free. Close inspection of the engine bay and undercarriage reveal the level of care and attention that went into the restoration, and the performance is as good as the cosmetics. The 6.25 liter V8 engine has been fully detailed with correct finishes and fittings, and since the restoration was completed, it has seen only light use. Performance is excellent, with the vast reserves of torque making for effortless progress. The engine is complemented by a smooth-shifting automatic transmission and the car rides and handles with confidence on correct-type crossply tires. With just 52 left hand drive examples built, this gorgeous machine represents a very rare opportunity to acquire one of the last fully coachbuilt Rolls-Royce motorcars; an important piece of mid-century design that inspired the company’s styling well into the next decade. Rarely do we see these cars restored to this high standard and with such meticulous attention to detail. It has been used sparingly since and fastidiously maintained in beautiful condition. Gorgeous and ready for enjoyment, this truly outstanding Silver Cloud III MPW is a fine choice for concours or road events, and is still one of the best cars we can imagine for cruising the boulevards of Hollywood.  

    For sale
    $425,000(£0)
  • 1970 Monteverdi 375/4 Sedan

    For sale
    $265,000(£0)

    At just 16 years of age, Peter Monteverdi constructed his first car, a Fiat 1100-based special he built in the back of his father’s garage business. Born in northern Switzerland, the young Peter had long held a passion for car design and motorsport. Just two years later, he would be selling racing cars under his own brand – MBM. He raced extensively in junior series, before entering Formula 1. He only had one start in F1 and a near fatal crash led to his abrupt retirement from racing. Peter took over the family garage business after the death of his father, and focused on building and racing sports cars. In order to support his fledgling business he began importing Ferraris to Switzerland in 1957, eventually earning a position as the official Swiss distributor for Ferrari. His importing business soon grew to include a stable of luxury cars that included BMW, Lancia and Rolls-Royce/Bentley. In 1967, following a falling out with Enzo Ferrari (a story we’ve heard before), Peter Monteverdi teamed up with Pietro Frua to design a full-fledged road-going car suitable for tackling those magnificent Swiss roads and satisfying the needs of the most discerning clients. Monteverdi took full advantage of the skills of his neighbors by outfitting his new GT with a steel chassis built in Germany, which was clothed it in sexy Italian coachwork. When selecting a powerplant, Peter looked outside of Europe – to Chrysler - and their massive, torque-rich 440 cubic inch V8 and robust Torque-flite automatic transmissions. Pietro Frua was hired to design the two-seat 375S, and the body shared some notable similarities to the AC 428 and Maserati Mistral, also Frua designs. Some more Italianate drama would ensue when Fissore was chosen over Frua to build the cars, but once production began, Monteverdi would attract the unique type of clientele he sought – those who eschewed traditional sports cars in favor of these highly exclusive new cars from Switzerland. Monteverdi soon added an ultra-high performance luxury limousine to his lineup of GT cars. Using elements of the updated 375L 2+2 (which Monteverdi himself reworked from the Frua design), over 20 inches was added to the wheelbase to accommodate two additional doors and provide ample leg room for rear passengers. The resulting car was a unique high-performance limousine that found great favor among the ultra-rich, particularly in the Middle East where the huge Chrysler powerplant was immune to high gas prices. Reportedly, the Royal Family of Qatar still maintains a fleet of five 375/4 sedans! Monteverdi was famously secretive about his production records, so it is not known exactly how many 375/4 limousines were built, but it is believed that fewer than 30 were built over an eight year period. This Monteverdi 375/4 sedan is chassis number 3007; a striking early-production example of this rare and highly exclusive super-saloon. A highly original car, it benefits from a recent cosmetic freshening in beautiful dark metallic aubergine paint over an attractive biscuit tan leather interior. Long, low and smartly styled, the 375/4 is a true standout among the Euro-American hybrids of the early 1970s. The dark, subtle metallic color suits the sharp lines of the body very well. The paint is applied to straight, crisp body panels. Brightwork is restrained, with the grille, bumpers and window surrounds all presenting in good order, and the car rides on a set of correct original cast-alloy center-lock wheels, made specifically for these cars. Monteverdi built his cars to a very high standard of quality, and given their exclusivity, they have an almost mythical presence today. The 375/4 was designed as a high-speed limousine that could be chauffeur driven or owner driven, so the cabin is of course trimmed with the utmost in period sophistication and luxury. The soft trim in this car is mainly original, with items such as the dash, console and perforated headlining remaining in very good original order. Biscuit tan hides on the seats and door cards are in excellent condition, as are the aubergine carpets that complement the body color. No 1970s ultra-lux limo would be complete without a television, and our 375/4 doesn’t disappoint with its whopping 6” Sony solid-state TV mounted in a custom leather trimmed console for rear-seat passengers. The original radio remains in the dash, and the original switchgear and HVAC controls all appear in good order. Chrysler’s mighty 440 cubic inch V8 is mated to a Torque-Flite automatic transmission and comes with all of the necessary items a high-performance limousine would need, such as power steering, air conditioning and cruise control. As with the interior, the under-hood presentation is highly original and well detailed. The very rare finned Monteverdi-branded valve covers are still in place, and the engine is well detailed and very tidy. The chassis and undercarriage show some use, appearing to be largely unrestored though still quite tidy and in good order. Overall, the 375/4 runs well and performs admirably on the road, with only some minor fettling required to bring it up to cross-continent ability. True to form with any Monteverdi, this handsome 375/4 is a highly exclusive and intriguing collector piece. Virtually every example had unique features tailored to meet the specific demands of an elite clientele. With its excellent cosmetics and sound mechanicals, this Monteverdi is a great example to use on the road, where the prodigious power and luxurious accommodations can be fully appreciated.

    For sale
    $265,000(£0)
  • 1933 MG L Type Roadster

    For sale
    $199,500(£0)

    In 1921, a young engineer named Cecil Kimber joined Oxford-based Morris Garages, a retail dealer founded by William Morris some ten years earlier. As Kimber grew more familiar with the products in his role as Sales Manager, his engineer’s eye realized the great potential in Morris’ motorcars. Kimber soon began to experiment with high-performance modifications, the first of which were based on the humble Morris Cowley. Customers responded positively to Kimber’s efforts and modified cars were soon leaving the Oxford works to meet customer demand. In approximately 1925, the first “official” MG was built, affectionately known as “Old Number One”, which was based on a heavily reworked Morris chassis, and powered by a Hotchkiss engine with an overhead valve cylinder head of Kimber’s design. Old Number One proved quite successful and soon comprehensively modified customer cars would follow. The cars from Morris Garages would soon feature unique chassis and bodywork with heavily reworked Morris engines. By the 1930s, business was booming for MG and they had a bustling works competition department as well as strong demand for privateer racing cars and road going sports cars. In short order, MGs were battling for superiority in the hotly contested Voiturette racing classes throughout Europe and Great Britain. Massively competitive, the series were for cars with engines displacing 750 cc, 1100 cc and 1500 cc respectively, and were a hotbed of creative engineering. Along with MG, other storied marques such as Bugatti, Delage, E.R.A. and even Mercedes Benz contested these championships. One of MG’s greatest victories came in 1933 when a supercharged six-cylinder K3 won the 1100 cc class of the grueling Mille Miglia. Their successes would have surely continued into the next decade, but MG had merged completely with Morris in 1935, and with it the Works racing department was shuttered, effectively ending MGs world-class racing efforts for good. Enthusiasts around the globe have kept spirit of early MG racing cars alive in the form of numerous “specials”. Given the scarcity and value of the factory racers, individual enthusiasts have built their own tributes using similar road car chassis, often modified with larger, supercharged engines and lightweight bodies to mimic that of the giant-slaying works cars. Well-built MG specials are very much a part of the culture of the marque, and are widely accepted and welcomed by enthusiasts. Our featured 1933 MG L-Type special is a fabulous example of the breed and a fine tribute to the famous Works racing cars from Longwall Street, Oxford. Recently out of a large private collection, this particular car was once part of the famous Gene Ponder collection of significant MG sports cars. In period, the L-Type was a proven competitor on rallies such as the Monte Carlo and the Tulip, while the J and K-types did duty on high-speed circuits. Starting with L-Type chassis, axles, and steering this car was suitably upgraded with J-Type inspired coachwork that features cycle wings, cut down cockpit sides and a specially made cowling for the front mounted supercharger. It is finished in a handsome two-tone black and green livery, and presents beautifully with very fine quality paintwork and detailing. A host of period-style accessories highlight the bodywork, including the high-mount exhaust with Brooklands silencer, Brooklands aeroscreens, black leather bonnet straps and proper painted wire wheels (with rear mounted spare) wrapped in fresh Blockley tires. The two-place cockpit is trimmed in high-quality green leather, with seats piped in black to mimic the paint scheme. A black and green canvas boot covers the rear of the body, while a matching black tonneau cover (also piped in green) can be fitted for overnight stops or solo driving in cool weather. As with any proper MG special, the E.N.V preselect gearbox is fully exposed, with the signature chrome gated gear selector falling easily to hand. Instrumentation includes a large combination Tachometer/Speedometer sitting directly in line of the driver’s sight and behind the signature four-spoke Brooklands Bluemels steering wheel. The purposeful road presence is backed up by a powerful 1,086 c.c. overhead cam six-cylinder engine. With its front-mounted Roots-type Magnacharger blower, the ‘six can punch well above its weight, with an evocative soundtrack that melds the whine of the blower, the meshing of gears and a sharp bark from the semi-flow-through Brooklands exhaust. This MG Special is an absolute delight to drive; feeling light on its feet, with direct steering and tremendous power, particularly for a pre-war automobile displacing under 1,100 cc! Upon its completion in the late 1980s, the L-Type special was raced in the MG Car Club event at the storied Silverstone circuit in the UK, and many years later while in the hands of Mr. Ponder, completed the California Mille. Thanks to recent attention, it remains a fabulous MG special that captures the essence of MG’s storied competition history in a captivating well detailed and finely crafted package.

    For sale
    $199,500(£0)
  • 1925 Kissel 6-55 Gold Bug Speedster

    For sale
    $189,500(£0)

    The Kissel Motor Car Company was founded in 1906 by two ambitious young brothers, George and Will Kissel. The Kissel family, who had emigrated from Germany to Wisconsin, gradually expanded their farming operations to include groceries, hardware, lumber and homebuilding among other businesses. The family’s generous wealth certainly aided in Will and George’s enthusiastic plans to build an automobile. The first prototype was quite advanced; a shaft-driven, four-cylinder runabout built in 1905. By 1907 production of the “Kissel-Kar” was underway, using Beaver engines and bodies supplied by the Zimmerman Brothers, sleigh builders from up the road in Waupun, Wisconsin. Soon, the Kissel brothers were producing a car entirely of their own manufacture, and orders from distributors came pouring in. The Kissel was known for being high on quality, value and performance – as well as for its clever features such as the “all year top” which was in essence the first removable hard top. Kissels grew more complex and luxurious, with a twelve cylinder “Double Six” eventually joining the lineup. Following a lull in sales in the immediate postwar years, things picked up for Kissel and they transitioned into the roaring twenties with a range of sporty, high quality cars. In 1919, Kissel introduced its most famous model – the “Gold Bug” Speedster. This sporty two seat roadster featured six-cylinder engines of Kissel’s own manufacture mated to a low-slung body with cycle fenders and no running boards that gave the appearance of a racer for the road. The flamboyant and stylish Gold Bug proved to be very popular with some of the biggest names of the time – Emelia Earhart, Fatty Arbuckle, Ralph DePalma, Greta Garbo and Al Jolson were all counted among the roster of Kissel Gold Bug owners. Numerous running changes were made through production, with the powerful 6-55 engine appearing in 1923, and a Lycoming-derived eight appearing two years later. Today, just a handful of Gold Bugs survive, each a rolling homage to the glamorous and exiting Jazz Age. Our featured Kissel 6-55 Gold Bug Speedster is a fabulous example with well-known history from new; one of just a handful of survivors from this esoteric marque. This particular Gold Bug was originally purchased by Edwin Johnson of Crystal Falls, Michigan. Mr. Johnson was one of three brothers, all of which owned Kissels, though it was Edwin who chose the sportiest model. In 1925, Edwin, along with his brother Emil, collected his new car directly from the Kissel factory in Hartford, Wisconsin. The base 6-55 cost $1,795 to which Johnson specified a number of options including four wheel hydraulic brakes, wire wheels, Clymer pistol-grip spot lights, twin spares, wind-wings, and many other items to bring the price to a not-insignificant $2,305. The available rumble seat was eschewed by Edwin Johnson in favor of the sportier dual compartment turtleback trunk. Edwin Johnson was clearly quite fond of his Gold Bug, as he kept it for the next twenty-seven years. Edwin Johnson reportedly sold the car in 1952 to a local car dealer for $200. The following year, it was purchased by Lawrence Wescott, also of Crystal Falls. In 1954, it was passed to Carl Arthur Johnson of Wabeno, Wisconsin who owned it through 1976. From 1976-1984 the Kissel was owned by Mrs. Mary Gillou before it joined the famous Imperial Palace collection from 1984-1988. After one additional short-term owner, it was purchased by the famed automotive artist and sculptor Stanley Wanlass in 1991. Finally, in 1994, the Kissel became a prized member of the most recent owner’s collection, who would commission the comprehensive, concours- quality restoration it wears today. Presented in a handsome color scheme of cream with forest green fenders, chassis, and leather interior, this Kissel 6-55 Gold Bug Speedster remains in very fine condition today, having been well maintained as part of a larger collection of important motorcars. It retains its myriad original accessories which include those amazing Clymer pistol-grip spot lights that mount through the windscreen, original windwings, Moto-Meter, dual sidemount spares, wire wheels, and a pair of period correct golf bags with matching wooden-shaft T. Stewart clubs mounted in their signature rear-fender holsters. The unique soft top, in quality tan canvas, folds neatly behind the seats in a low-slung position, and a pair of matching side curtains is included for all-weather touring capability. Mechanically, this Gold Bug is in fine running order, though limited use in recent years may require some minor maintenance. The 55-horsepower Kissel six-cylinder engine is beautifully detailed in black with correct nickel hardware and fittings. The engine still wears an original-type Stromberg carburetor which is supplemented by the optional Stewart Vacuum Gasoline System to ensure a steady flow of fuel at high speed. Since the restoration, this Gold Bug was shown extensively by its enthusiastic owner at prestigious events such as the Meadowbrook Concours, the 1997 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, as well as numerous AACA and CCCA National and Grand National events. As a testament to the quality of the restoration and its care, this Kissel has continued to win awards well after the restoration, with an Award of Distinction at the Glenmoor Gathering coming in 2010. The restoration has mellowed slightly though it remains still very attractive, and the car would certainly be welcome in regional concours or CCCA and AACA events. This delightfully sporty and distinctive motorcar is an outstanding example from this seldom seen marque. Recognized as a CCCA Full Classic and beautifully presented in attractive colors, this Kissel 6-55 Gold Bug is a wonderful example that is prime for enjoyment on the road, on a concours field, or for runs to the country club.

    For sale
    $189,500(£0)
  • 2014 Bentley Flying Spur Saloon For Sale

    For sale
    $132,500(£0)

    Thoroughly updated and improved for the 2014 model year, the Bentley Flying Spur continued its reign as the king of the super saloons. Based on the revolutionary Continental GT coupe, the Flying Spur deftly combines supercar performance with unparalleled luxury and comfort. Aficionados will first recognize the Flying Spur has been subtly restyled with a slightly crisper, taut appearance compared to the previous generation, yet it still retains the distinctly muscular look characterized by the original Continental GT and Flying Spur saloon. Weight has been reduced and engineers made countless improvements to the ride and handling, go allow for greater comfort and improved control over less than ideal surfaces. Of course, the performance remains astounding, thanks to lower weight and 50 additional horsepower. The signature 6.0 liter, twin-turbo W12 engine now boasts 616 horsepower and 590 ft-lbs of torque, giving the Flying Spur otherworldly performance – particularly for such a large and luxurious sedan. Other improvements include a revised interior and entertainments system, and the addition of an 8-speed ZF automatic gearbox, driving all four wheels as before. Since its introduction in 2006, the Flying Spur has redefined what a world-class luxury car can do and this improved model raises the bar even higher than before. This gorgeous 2014 Flying Spur is a one-owner example that has covered fewer than 10,000 miles from new and presents in excellent condition throughout. It was purchased new in California by Burt Sugarman, the famed television and music producer responsible for The Midnight Special, and The Newlywed Game among many other successful programs in the 1970s and 80s. Mr. Sugarman is also known to be a passionate automobile enthusiast, and he was responsible for the creation of the Ghia 450 SS in the late 1960s. Finished in White Sand over Linen hides, this impeccable Bentley is a highly optioned example that has been used gently in the hands of its previous owner. The White Sand paintwork is excellent, with straight panels all around. A clean Carfax verifies single ownership and zero accidents. Options include bright-finish 21” ten-spoke alloy wheels, chrome matrix grilles in the front bumper, rear view camera with parking sensors front and rear, piped leather seating, 3-spoke sports steering wheel and picnic trays for rear passengers. The interior is beautifully appointed and in excellent condition, feeling showroom fresh with fine Linen hides contrasted with cocoa brown piping, carpets, dash, steering wheel rim and console. Burl walnut and brushed aluminum trim are unmarked and in fine order. Rear seat passengers enjoy greater legroom than before, along with beautiful picnic trays and individually adjustable seating and HVAC controls. Electrical functions work as they should and occupants can enjoy the crushing performance of this Bentley in peerless comfort and silence. Given the low mileage, it comes as no surprise that the handling and road manners are excellent and the car performs as expected. The original manuals, instruction books, quick reference guides and the instructional DVD are included, as is a spare wheel and tool set, original front plate bracket, Bentley-branded battery tender and two keys. Highly optioned and finished in striking colors, this low-mileage Flying Spur is an outstanding example that has been maintained in impeccable condition by its sole enthusiast owner and is ready for enjoyment by the next keeper.  

    For sale
    $132,500(£0)
  • 1951 Jaguar XK 120 Roadster

    For sale
    $159,500(£0)

    The sensational Jaguar XK120 first appeared at the 1948 London Motor Show to astonished audiences. This svelte and sexy show car was originally intended to be a styling exercise used to highlight Jaguar’s upcoming and advanced new XK twin-cam inline six-cylinder engine, but response from the press and public was so positive that it took little persuasion to convince Jaguar boss Sir William Lyons to develop the car for production. Thankfully, the road going car lost none of the impact of the original show car when it hit the market. Aside from the headline-grabbing engine, the XK120 featured independent front suspension sprung by torsion bars, with a Salisbury limited-slip live rear axle riding on leaf springs out back. Large four wheel drum brakes were adequate though could fade when pushed too hard on track. But the star of the show was indeed the iron block, alloy head “XK” twin cam six, good for 160 horsepower in standard form, upwards of 210hp in later models, and 300 or more on the race track. The “120” part of the XK120 name came courtesy of the top speed it reached on a pre-production test, making it the fastest production road car of its day. The earliest cars were hand-built with alloy bodies, which later changed to more cost effective and durable steel construction once the tooling was ready. The XK120 earned its legendary status thanks to its incredible performance and unmistakable beauty, creating one of the most iconic sports cars of all time. This fine 1951 XK120 OTS roadster is an early production example that has had just three owners from new. It is presented in beautifully maintained order since receiving a high-quality, nut-and bolt restoration to concours standards by its second owner. According to the Jaguar Heritage Certificate, chassis number 670662 is a numbers-matching car that was built on the 4th of September 1950 – coincidentally Sir William Lyons’ birthday. An early steel-bodied left-hand drive car, it was first finished in pastel blue over a duo-tone blue interior and delivered new to D. S. Gross of San Francisco, California in the opening days of 1951. Mr. Gross used the car sparingly through his tenure but he retained it for 33 years, only selling it as a complete, rust-free but non-driving project in 1984. The second owner, Vincent Weatherby of Costa Mesa, California was a well-known area car enthusiast who purchased the car for himself, recognizing the importance of such a low mileage and original XK120 roadster. In the late 1990s, he embarked on a multi-year concours-quality restoration, returning the Jaguar to its former glory. Those who witnessed the project state that no bolt was left unturned, and every finish and detail was brought back to factory-correct standards. Shortly after the restoration was completed in 2000, Mr. Weatherby sold the Jaguar to its 3rd and most recent owner, an enthusiast and collector from Wisconsin. Over the past 18 years, the XK120 was meticulously cared for and maintained, with much of the maintenance and detailing handled by the renowned John Kies at Motion Products in Wisconsin. Now presented in the striking but seldom-seen original Jaguar shade of Squadron Blue, this XK120 remains in exceptional condition today. In the years since the restoration was completed, this car has benefitted from light and careful use, as well as extensive maintenance to ensure it is in top running order. The body exhibits excellent panel gaps and fit, and the paint work remains in very fine order, revealing the outstanding quality of the original restoration as well as the care it has received since. The beautiful blue paintwork is set off by sparkling chrome knock-off wire wheels wrapped in Firestone whitewall tires, appropriate for a US delivered car such as this, and the rest of the brightwork also presents very well, showing only slight mellowing. Trimmed in gray leather, the cockpit is beautifully finished to a high standard with properly upholstered seats appearing in fine order, and with minimal creasing from use. Likewise, gray carpets, leather-wrapped dash and gray hardura door cards are in excellent condition. This car wears the correct early-style convertible top which is noted for its more pronounced teardrop shape. When the top was restored, the original French gray fabric topping was not available, so this high-quality salt-and-pepper material was sourced, and is a very attractive alternative. For the purist, a light gray vinyl soft top will also be included. The original, numbers-matching 3.4 liter, 160 horsepower twin-cam “XK” inline six rests under the hood. It is of course clean, tidy and well detailed, showing signs of regular maintenance despite the limited use. It runs very well, breathing through original twin S.U. carburetors. The four-speed manual gearbox feels tight and precise as it should and the road manners are quite good. The most recent owners went to great lengths to document the remarkable history of this fine Jaguar. A large file includes receipts from the work performed while in their care, as well as a multi-page account of the previous ownership, the restoration work, a Jaguar heritage certificate and numerous period articles and adverts. The sale will also include a full set of tools (including the jack, Thor hammer and pouch) restored by expert Tom Buckus, as well as a custom tonneau in gray canvas, and a French gray soft top in vinyl. Maintained with little regard to cost and used sparingly, this lovely XK120 was not shown during the last owner’s time with it, and as such, it would be a very welcome appearance at any Jaguar club concours, regional show or tour.

    For sale
    $159,500(£0)
  • 1967 Renault Caravelle S

    For sale
    $39,500(£0)

    In the late 1950s, Renault was locked in a battle with Volkswagen for superiority in the burgeoning import car market in America. Affordable foreign cars were just starting to find their footing among U.S. buyers, who still clung loyally to their large and luxurious barges from the big three, but even in the 1950s, fuel efficiency was becoming an increasingly important issue, as was maneuverability in urban environments, where these compact and lightweight cars were at their best. Renault had been playing second fiddle to Volkswagen was looking to up their game in this competitive and fast-growing new market. On paper, the Renault Dauphine actually shared many characteristics with the Beetle, namely the rear engine layout, basic construction, and styling that leaned toward the quirky and cute. The Dauphine offered perhaps greater practicality with its four-door body, but Volkswagen seemed to have a stranglehold on the market thanks to strong marketing and an ever-growing cult-following. While at a business meeting in Florida, Renault bosses Pierre Dreyfus and Fernand Picard were inspired to enhance Renault’s image with a sporty little coupe based on the humble Dauphine. Mimicking VW’s own Karmann-Ghia, the new car was based on a bog-standard Dauphine platform but dressed in a pretty new two-door coupe and cabriolet body. And just like their German rivals, Renault turned to Carrozzeria Ghia to design the new car, which would be called the Floride in Europe and Caravelle in the US. The actual design was drawn by the young Ghia employee, Pietro Frua, who did a masterful job of camouflaging the Caravelle’s humble roots. Upon its debut in Geneva, over 8,000 orders poured in and, when the car was shown in the United States for the first time, a further 13,000 orders would follow. When the Dauphine was replaced by the R8 at the end of 1963, the Caravelle continued with subtly reworked styling by the now-independent Pietro Frua and powered by a new five main-bearing 956 cc inline four cylinder engine. For 1965, the Caravelle S was offered with an enlarged 1108 cc version of the R8 engine producing 55 horsepower and with four-wheel Bosch disc brakes, putting the Caravelle in line with other compact sports cars like the Triumph Spitfire and Austin Healey Sprite. Ultimately, the competition from Britain and Germany proved too much for Renault, and the Caravelle quietly disappeared from the lineup after 1967. We have long been fans of these pretty little Renaults, and this 1967 Caravelle S is by far one of the finest, best restored examples we have had the pleasure to offer. Quirky, fun and charming, this Caravelle S cabriolet is beautifully presented in metallic lilac over a black interior. It has been restored to a standard that is virtually unseen on these cars, and is surely one of the finest of its kind available. The attractive light metallic lilac paintwork is applied to an outstanding body, with crisp and straight panels. The brightwork has been similarly well-restored and car sits proud on the road on factory-correct three-lug wheels with tiny 135 x 380 Michelin whitewall tires. Inside, the outstanding presentation continues with fully restored upholstery using high quality materials and patterns that are true to original. Floors are lined with gray square weave carpet, and details such as the Renault seatbelt buckles and polished “Caravelle” script door sills show the level of care that went into this restoration. Front and rear seats are in excellent order, as is the black canvas soft top and the boot cover. Even the trunk has been fully detailed with the original tool roll still in place on the bulkhead. As a whole, the interior shows little use since the restoration was completed and has been maintained in excellent condition. Lifting the rear engine lid reveals the finely detailed 1108 c.c. four cylinder engine. The paint work and detailing is excellent, and many of the correct original tags and labels have been restored. It runs well, appears to have been used only on occasion, and it has been maintained in top condition as part of a large and eclectic private collection of cars. Despite the humble economy car underpinnings and modest output, this outstanding Renault is an absolute joy to drive, loaded with character and proof that horsepower isn’t always a necessary part of the Fun Factor. Much like the Karmann Ghia that inspired it, the cheeky and cheerful Renault Caravelle packs abundant style into a tiny package and we are very pleased to offer this exquisite example for the next owner to enjoy.

    For sale
    $39,500(£0)
  • 1937 Aero Type 50 Roadster

    For sale
    $39,500(£0)

    As the automobile industry grew in conjunction with the aircraft industry, some overlap between the two was inevitable. Going back through history, some notable crossovers from aircraft to motorcars and vice versa include Rolls-Royce, SAAB, Mitsubishi and Bristol. There have certainly been others some other more obscure ventures, one of which is the Czech firm Aero. Aero was founded in Praha in 1919 primarily for the manufacture and repair of aircraft. But when the aircraft business was lean, Aero turned to making motorcycle side cars, motorcar bodies and eventually, moving to complete car production. At first, cars were assembled in the Aero Works using parts supplied by EMKA, however by 1929, they shifted to producing their own complete car in-house. Aero’s first complete automobile was the Aero 10HP, a cute cyclecar with simple but clever unitary platform construction and a 490cc single cylinder two-stroke engine driving the rear wheels. By 1932, Aero’s cars were growing larger and more sophisticated, with the 500, 662 and 1000 models (all named for their displacement) available as four-seat sedans or sporty little roadsters. The roadsters, particularly with the 1000 cc two-stroke four-cylinder, proved quite popular in competition. In fact, Aero enjoyed a fair bit of sporting success within Eastern Europe and even in major international events such as the 1934 Monte Carlo Rally, where Bohumil Turek scored a third in class in his Aero 1000. Building on that momentum, Aero introduced the A30 and its larger sibling, the A50, which both featured a sophisticated independently sprung platform chassis and front wheel drive. The 50 was a very special machine, a flagship model of sorts for Aero. Bodies were available from the factory, however clients could opt for a body from a coachbuilder as well. Automobile production trickled to a stop following WWII when the Czech motor industry became nationalized. But Aero continued making aircraft, and remains in business today as Aero Vodochody. This 1937 Aero 50 is an extremely rare example of this most unusual Czech sporting car. While little of the earliest history is known, we do know that this Model 50 was first brought to the United States by an American serviceman after WWII, and has remained largely untouched since. This particular car is quite unusual in that it wears a very attractive coachbuilt body by J. Sodomka, a Czech coachbuilder known for building lavish bodies inspired by the great French design houses of the time. This car is also rather unusual in that it is fitted with a 1971cc OHV inline six-cylinder engine sourced from a BMW 326. As the Aero 50 is front-wheel drive, the engine is turned 180 degrees in the chassis, and the fitment appears very well engineered, most likely done before the car came to the United States. In speaking with marque experts, we have learned that the addition of the BMW inline-six was a relatively popular upgrade in the period, giving the Aero 50 far greater performance than the standard two-cycle engine could deliver. Some believe that conversions were done at the factory, and while this has not been verified, it would go far in explaining the quality of the installation. Another distinct possibility is that the engine was fitted at the time the chassis was at the Sodomka coachworks. The Aero 50 presents today as a partially completed project. The most recent owner did begin a restoration after the car languished for many years, however it was left unfinished. The engine appears to have been restored, and some of the body panels repaired and primed. Even in its imperfect condition, it is easy to appreciate the beauty and quality of the Sodomka coachwork. It is a finely styled machine, very much in the spirit of a BMW 328, Adler Trumpf Sport or pre-war Riley. Restoration of the body has been started, though some additional fabrication work on the floors and rear section would be required. Once completed, however, this would be a wonderful and intriguing candidate for tours, rallies or shows, as the twin-carb BMW engine is a delightful and tractable unit. Few examples of the Aero 50 were sold within the Czech Republic and even fewer have made it outside of Europe, making this coachbuilt example an extremely rare sight from this esoteric Czech automaker.

    For sale
    $39,500(£0)
  • 1929 Alfa Romeo 6C 1750SS

    For sale
    $1,875,000(£0)

    In the mid-1920s, the Vittorio Jano began work on the high-performance 6C (sei cilindri); the car that would become arguably the most significant model in Alfa Romeo’s history. With respect to the earlier RL and RM models, it was the 6C that dramatically sharpened Alfa Romeo’s focus on light weight, excellent handling and high power output. The spirit of Jano’s brilliant 6C is found in nearly every production Alfa Romeo through today. Production of the 6C began in early 1927, as the single overhead cam-equipped 1500 Normale. Jano quickly followed that up with the Sport model, featuring a new twin-cam cylinder head. The new model, known as the 6C 1500 Sport was an instant success. The 1500 Mille Miglia Speciale of 1928, saw the first application of a Roots-type supercharger on the twin-cam engine. By 1929 Alfa Romeo refined the formula even further for the 3rd series with a bump in displacement to 1750c.c. Along with the larger engine; the car was also thoroughly refined to improve build quality, handling and braking. As before, clients could opt for the single cam Touring model, Twin Cam Sport or the supercharged Super Sport. The Grand Sport and Grand Turismo models would follow later in the 1930s. But for 1929, it was the potent 6C Super Sport that became the tool of choice for privateer racers. The shortened chassis, supercharger and lightweight coachwork made for an extremely capable machine that proved itself in grueling events such as the Mille Miglia and Targa Florio. It was Giuseppe Campari with his 6C 1750 Super Sport that gave Alfa Romeo an overall win in the 1929 Mille Miglia. The balance of outright speed, reliability and ease of service made the 6C 1750 SS the perfect choice for serious competitors, and its racing exploits along earned it the legendary status it enjoys today. We are very pleased to offer this stunning 1929 Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 SS, chassis number 0312901. Built during the 3rd series of 6C production, this is one of just 121 series 3 cars produced, and one of just a handful of known survivors. While details of the earliest history have been lost to time, various records and expert opinions compiled by the likes of noted author and Alfa Romeo historian Simon Moore help us paint a picture of its story. Historical archives in Milan show no record of the car registered in the city, so it was likely delivered elsewhere in Italy, most likely fitted with sparse torpedo roadster coachwork. We know that by the early 1930s the car would appear in England where it was believed to have been updated with the coachwork it wears today, though Angela Cherrett, a highly respected marque historian, shows no records of the car in England prior to that, so it likely changed hands early in its life and came to England in the early part of the 1930s. John de Boer, also a highly respected marque historian believes S/N 0312901 was likely delivered with sporting “torpedo” coachwork as several examples close to this serial number were similarly bodied. It is understood by both Moore and de Boer that the car’s sparse original coachwork was updated in about 1935 when its then-owner saw Alfa’s magnificent new 8C 2900 on the stand at the London Motor Show. He commissioned a body inspired by the big 8C, but one that retained its own unique character. Constructed in steel and without doors, the sleek and stylish coachwork was built for fast road use rather than outright competition, as doors were generally required for full competition use at the time. Ultimately, this unique Alfa Romeo would spend nearly six decades in South Africa in the hands of the late Dr. Hugh Gearing, a passionate Alfa Romeo collector and enthusiast. As Dr. Gearing was able to discern, in 1936, shortly after receiving its striking new coachwork, the 6C was exported to South Africa with then-owner Lex Williamson. Williamson sold the car to Paul Fatti of Fatti Engineering in Johannesburg. As Dr. Gearing’s son recalls, “Dad bought the car from Paul Fatti in Johannesburg in 1950. It was stripped down to a bare chassis, but very complete. He (Hugh Gearing) rebuilt it and used it extensively when his 8C2600 was not in use…” Dr. Gearing would continue to cherish and enjoy the Alfa 6C regularly throughout South Africa for the next sixty years. As a founding member of the Historic Racing Car Register, Gearing and his 6C were a regular sight at picnics, hillclimbs and classic car events throughout South Africa. The Alfa remained very original throughout Gearing’s time with it, with the only real mishap occurring when the original supercharger sustained some damage during an event in the 1960s. A Marshall Cabin Blower was fitted in its place, but thankfully, Gearing was wise enough to save the original. In the 1980s, the Alfa was refreshed and continued to be enjoyed regularly by the Gearing family; even performing a few laps of Kyalami Circuit for a Pirelli promotional event with Juan Manuel Fangio at the wheel. ? Following Dr. Gearing’s passing, the Alfa Romeo 6C made its way to the United States where it would soon join a diverse collection of important automobiles in 2012. A comprehensive restoration was commissioned, with the body and chassis carefully stripped and resprayed in a deep gloss black, along with matching black wire wheels. The comprehensive mechanical restoration which included rebuilding the original, numbers matching engine, was handled by Charlie Webb of Automotive Restorations in Connecticut in 2013. At the same time, the cockpit was restored in the beautiful brick-colored heavy-grained leather it wears today. The original supercharger was rebuilt by D.L. George of Philadelphia and refitted using the 1931-dated Mimini carburetor that has been with the car for many years. During the restoration, the Alfa was personally inspected by John de Boer who noted the engine, supercharger, front & rear axles, and steering box were all within the expected number range for this chassis. He also noted that while the gearbox was from a slightly different series, it is the unit that was with the car when Hugh Gearing purchased it, meaning it was likely fitted prior to World War II. ?This striking and thoroughly unique Alfa Romeo presents in gorgeous, concours quality condition today. Sitting low and lean, the rich black paintwork suits the character of the car beautifully. The quality is first rate and the driving experience an absolute joy, with electrifying performance courtesy of the jewel-like supercharged inline-six and fully sorted chassis. Following its restoration, S/N 0312901 has been shown at prestigious events such as the Cavallino Classic in Palm Beach, and The Elegance at Hershey in Pennsylvania and the Boston Cup Concours in 2017 where it was awarded first in class. It remains absolutely crisp and well suited for duty on the concours lawn, yet is equally fit for events such as the Colorado Grand or Copperstate 1000. It is also FIVA certified (#047398), making it eligible for numerous driving events worldwide. Beautifully presented, it benefits from a fascinating history, compiled and vetted by respected historians. This truly unique Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Super Sport is certain to turn heads today just as it did for all those years in the care of Dr. Gearing.

    For sale
    $1,875,000(£0)
  • 1952 Aston Martin DB2 Drophead Coupe For Sale

    For sale
    $550,000(£0)

    Aston Martin has a long and illustrious history of sporting success, which was mirrored by a long history of financial struggles and close encounters with the receivers. After the successful “Bertelli” days prior to WWII, the firm’s post-war resurgence took some time to get underway as they were short on cash and resources to fully develop a fresh car for the new era. It took the arrival of Yorkshire industrialist David Brown to not only get Aston Martin back on its feet, but to fully establish it as a world-class sports car manufacturer. Pre-war Astons were little more than thinly disguised racers sold to select clients to fund the racing team, but post war buyers were demanding more, and thankfully, with David Brown’s much needed injection of cash, Aston Martin could now deliver. Brown came to Aston with more than just money, however. He also brought Lagonda, who had previously acquired the services of W.O. Bentley following his fallout with Rolls-Royce. Bentley’s magnificent twin-cam inline six, originally destined for Lagonda, would form the foundation of Aston’s recovery and subsequent success. Aston’s first proper post-war car was the DB1, officially known as the “Two Litre Sports”. It proved to be a false start with only a handful built before the arrival of the modern and properly developed DB2. The DB2 featured a slick new fully-enveloped aluminum alloy body designed by Frank Feeley, as well as a shortened version of the tubular chassis from the DB1 and Lagonda’s delectable 2.6 liter twin-cam inline six, which was designed by W.O. Bentley and William Watson. The DB2 was a tremendous success for Aston Martin, with the works racing cars continuing Aston’s pre-war success on track at LeMans, Spa and at home at events like the RAC Tourist Trophy. After several prototypes were built and successfully campaigned on track, road car production began in 1950, with 410 examples built over the next three years. The majority of those cars wore the fixed head coupe coachwork, while just 98 left the works in drophead coupe form. Of those, just a handful remain and are highly sought after by enthusiasts. We are very pleased to offer this handsome 1952 Aston Martin DB2 Drophead, serial number LML/50/217. One of very few surviving examples, this car has been fully restored by a noted enthusiast and presents in a striking combination of silver over a red interior. According to the BMIHT Heritage Certificate, it was originally a left-drive export model delivered new to the USA. At some point in its life it was converted to right drive for home-market use. The most recent owner, who is an experienced restorer, collector and racer, acquired the DB2 in the early 2000s and comprehensive restoration took place with a great deal of the meticulous work performed by the owner himself. Starting with what was a very sound car, the alloy bodywork was carefully restored with great care paid to preserving the original panels, which were then painted an attractive bright silver. The DB2’s shape did not rely on heavy chrome accents, but the limited brightwork (door handles, lamps, bumper trims and miscellaneous fittings) has all been very well restored and presents in beautiful condition. The DB2 sits on proper painted wire wheels, shod with correct 6.00-16 Dunlop Roadspeed tires. Contrasting the silver body is a vibrant red interior, fully restored to a high standard. The seats and door cards are trimmed in bright red hides, with complementing red Wilton carpets, all piped in gray. The leather presents in very good condition, remaining beautiful with slightly mellowed character since the restoration. Wood trim adorns the door tops, steering wheel rim and instrument cluster, all of which is beautifully restored and finished. Gauges and switchgear are correct and in fine order. Behind the seats, the parcel shelf includes a custom fitted suitcase in matching red leather - allowing enough room for a weekend getaway. A new top was fitted in black canvas and trimmed in red piping to provide a subtle contrast against the silver body. With the top down, a red leather boot can be fitted to cover the soft top. The impressive presentation continues when the clamshell bonnet it opened, revealing the polished cam covers and bright red cylinder head of W.O. Bentley’s twin-cam inline six. The engine, which is a slightly later replacement in correct specification, has been fully detailed yet remains a strong runner that delivers excellent performance. One of the best features of the Lagonda-sourced engine is the sharp, raspy exhaust note that is only enhanced when the roof is folded. Aston Martin cleverly packaged the jack and wheel tools under the bonnet, all of which are present and have been correctly restored to the same meticulous standard as the rest of this fine car. All of the effort put into the restoration paid off in the form of a Best in Class at the prestigious Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in 2008, as well as an AACA Senior National First Prize in 2008, which was backed up with a Grand National First Prize in 2010 and a Best in Show at the 2015 Keels and Wheels. The car has also been shown and taken home class wins at numerous other events including the Hilton Head Concours, Meadowbrook, The Glenmoor Gathering and Keenland Concours. Since its restoration, the DB2 has been used gently and maintained in very fine condition throughout. The sale includes factory parts books and workshop manual, along with copies of original factory literature and a British Motor Industry Heritage Trust Certificate. This is a wonderful opportunity to acquire a very fine example of the landmark car that set Aston Martin on the path to greatness.

    For sale
    $550,000(£0)
  • 1940 Ford Deluxe Sedan Delivery

    For sale
    $59,500(£0)

    For the 1940 model year, Ford’s new Model 01A and 022A debuted with handsome styling courtesy of the company’s brilliant chief designer Eugene T. “Bob” Gregorie. The signature of the new Ford lineup was its V-shaped grille with horizontal bars and pronounced forward hood that was inspired by the Lincoln Zephyr of 1936. Now firmly in the modern streamlined age, headlights were fully integrated into the fenders, and placed in the outboard position on both Deluxe and Standard models. This gave the new Fords a fresh and decidedly modern look that would see them into the late 1940s. Mechanically, the new Ford was a natural evolution of earlier models, with the venerable “flathead” V8 in 85 horsepower specification fitted to the majority of cars sold – though this would be the final year the smaller V8-60 would be available for buyers. Ford offered the cars in both Standard and Deluxe trim, the latter featuring a more stylized grille, “Deluxe” emblazoned hubcaps, and a more comprehensively equipped interior with additional instruments and signature sand-beige two-tone paint to match the steering wheel. As before, Ford offered buyers a wide variety of two and four-door bodies, convertibles, and even a wood bodied station wagon. The company would continue to accommodate commercial buyers as well, offering the Panel Delivery in both standard and deluxe trim. Today, the Panel Delivery is one of the rarest of all Ford Deluxe body styles of the era. This 1940 Deluxe Sedan Delivery is an attractive example of this stylish and exceptionally rare pre-war Ford, wearing a nice quality older restoration in the period correct shade of Mandarin Maroon. Just over 4,000 of these pretty Sedan Deliveries were built in 1940 and sadly, most of them were run into the ground as they served their purpose as hard-working tools for commercial duty. Furthermore, once they were cast aside, their V8 engines were often scavenged by hot rodders, so only a scant few survive today in original condition. Thankfully, this cherished example was kept for three decades by a family from North Dakota before moving into two important collections of early Ford V8 cars, followed by a collector of vintage cars and memorabilia. Along the way it was treated to a sympathetic restoration and it remains in largely factory correct condition today. The maroon paint is very strong, with good bodywork and factory appropriate panel fitment all around. Chrome bumpers, wheel trims and other bright work such as the headlight trims and grille are all in very good condition. Steel wheels wear correct Deluxe-script hubcaps and wide whitewall tires. Along with the body, the interior was well restored and it presents in excellent condition, with high quality grained leatherette upholstery as original on the seats and door panels. It also features matching upholstered side panels and load-floor carpeting in the cargo area. This being a commercial car, the equipment is limited, but it does include its original radio, as well as the correct Deluxe-trim steering wheel, switches, window winders, clock and gauges. Under hood presentation is excellent with the 85 horsepower flathead V8 appearing extremely well-detailed with correct branded radiator hoses, correct type clamps and hardware, original oil-bath air cleaner and the proper dark green paint on the block and heads. Overall, this handsome Ford Delivery remains in tidy and attractive condition, ready for use as a head-turning promotional vehicle or simply for enjoyment at your local cruise night. The Sedan Delivery may have been intended as a humble commercial vehicle, but thanks to the efforts and unique vision of both Edsel Ford and his chief stylist Bob Gregorie, the Sedan Delivery was every bit as beautiful as its passenger car stablemates.

    For sale
    $59,500(£0)
  • 1967 ASA 1000GT Coupe

    For sale
    $179,500(£0)

    In the days before the days of the 246 Dino, Enzo Ferrari himself once sought to extend the reach of his company via an entry level sports car that he planned to design, then license the construction to an outside firm. At a year-end press conference in 1959, Enzo displayed a prototype of the engine and announced it would go into specially designed smallbore sports car. Known internally as “854” (850cc, 4 cylinders), the tiny engine looked very much like one-third of a 250-series V12 (if you imagine another inline four and a V4 left over). While in development, the engine was fitted to a Fiat 1200 test mule that had been modified to handle the new powerplant and fitted with a strange mix of leftover and new Pininfarina panels, built by Scaglietti to look like a 250 PF coupe in miniature. Journalists dubbed the car “Ferrarina” despite it wearing nothing in the way of identification (save for a mysterious machine gun badge) as they had spotted none other than Enzo Ferrari himself driving the prototype every day as part of its development. Enzo Ferrari never had the intention of building the car himself despite his staunch support of the project. He shopped around the first prototype to a number of manufacturing facilities (including an Italian arms company, explaining the badging) but found no takers. Regardless, development continued, as the great Giotto Bizzarrini designed a new chassis to accommodate an updated, 985 c.c. version of the four-cylinder engine. The tubular chassis resembled that of a scaled down 250 GT, with double wishbones up front, a live axle with trailing arms in the rear and a set of specially designed Dunlop disc brakes. A new prototype featured a sleek and purposeful fastback body by Bertone. Finally, a deal was struck with the De Nora family of Milan and several former racing drivers who agreed to build the car under the newly formed Autocostruzioni Societa per Azioni banner. Despite its exquisite quality and Ferrari cachet, sales were sluggish, and ASA could not build enough cars to keep costs low enough to compete with Lancia, Alfa Romeo or even Abarth. In the end, just 52 coupes, 14 spyders and 20 post-Ferrari “Berlinetta 411s” were produced. 32 of those coupes would come to American shores. Yet, in spite of the commercial failure, the ASA 1000 GT has become a highly collectible piece of classic Italian etceterini and Ferrari history. We are pleased to offer this rare and exquisite 1967 ASA 1000 GT. This beautifully restored example is one of just 32 original US spec cars, and was first sold on March 16, 1967 via Luigi Chinetti Motors. The original invoice shows this car, S/N 01196, was purchased by Ms. Ruth Lesson of Duanesburg, NY. At $5,967 the ASA was no bargain, and Ms. Lesson traded her 1964 Mercury Comet Cyclone Coupe in for a $1570.00 credit. While the ASA lacked the grunt of the Mercury, it was certainly a step up in terms of handling, build quality and exclusivity. The extensive history file shows it was sold by the Lessons in 1986 to William G. Inglis, a noted Ferrari enthusiast from California. Notes show the car had been off the road since the 1970s, with unknown engine problems. The little ASA remained with Mr. Inglis for many years, and in the 1990s he commissioned the highly respected restorer Mike Regalia to perform a comprehensive, multi-year restoration. The ASA was repainted to a very high standard in the red it wears today, the drivetrain fully rebuilt, and the interior fully restored to original spec using correct style black upholstery. The car traded hands in 2004, joining Ed Brown’s collection in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Mr. Brown enjoyed the little ASA for several more years before selling it on where it became part of another large collection of rare Italian sports cars. Today, the ASA presents in beautiful condition, the concours quality restoration having matured nicely with some careful use and enjoyment on the road. One of the reasons the ASA 1000 GT was so expensive in its day was its exceptional build quality, and this example does not disappoint thanks to excellent panel fit and fine detailing. The paintwork remains in very good condition, and the delicate chrome bumpers and trim are straight and beautifully presented. The body wears correct Carello lights and ASA/Bertone badging as original. It rides on factory original knock-off alloy wheels, made for ASA by Borrani. The wheels are wrapped in classic-style rubber to round out the period correct look. Under the bonnet is the 1,000 c.c. four-cylinder engine that looks quite familiar to anyone with early Ferrari V12 experience. This is the original, matching-numbers engine; fully rebuilt as part of the restoration and well detailed with correct fittings including correct Weber 40DCOE carburetors, tubular exhaust header, as well as ancillaries such as correct reservoirs, washer bag, and wrinkle finish paints. Records show the original flywheel was lightened during the extensive engine rebuild, making the already eager little engine even happier to rev. The junior Ferrari theme continues inside the cockpit, which has been fully restored in correct black upholstery and light gray carpets. Switchgear and controls fall easily to hand and the seats are comfortable, with plenty of room even for six-footers. A gorgeous Nardi wheel falls easily to hand and the driver faces a clear array of ASA-branded Jaeger dials. On the road, the Bizzarrini-designed chassis is balanced and lively, with light steering, a positive gearshift, perfectly suited to the intoxicating engine with its distinct, staccato exhaust note. Included in the sale is an extensive history file with numerous receipts and records, original invoice, magazine articles, photos, as well as original manuals and brochures. Eligible for numerous driving events and concours worldwide, this exquisite, intoxicating automobile is an outstanding example of the rare and charming baby Ferrari, a car that was worthy of praise from il Commendatore himself.

    For sale
    $179,500(£0)
  • 1927 Ford Model T Depot Hack

    For sale
    $23,500(£0)

    Ford’s brilliant, ubiquitous Model T is so much more than just a car. Yes, this simple and robust machine was put into the hands of millions who never before dreamed of automobile ownership, and yet it was so adaptable it that ranks as one of the most important inventions of the 20th century. Henry Ford’s development of the moving assembly line was so significant that it is held in the same regard as the likes of Alexander Graham Bell’s telephone and Eli Whitney’s cotton gin as the most influential advancements in American Industrial history. Even when the ingenious production methods are taken out of the equation, the Model T stands proudly as a truly versatile machine that could be modified for countless tasks beyond simple transportation. From racing cars to farm implements and industrial machinery, the Model T could do it all. In the time of the Model T, the easiest way to get from city to city was by train. A road network had yet to be developed, and automobiles were not yet feasible for long-distance travel. Once people arrived at their destination, there were no rental cars and taxi cabs only existed in the largest of cities. That left the average American with two alternatives: walk or take the street car if there was one. The solution came in the form of the station wagon, or alternately “depot hack”. These vehicles were typically sent to pick up visitors and their baggage at the stations to bring them back to hotels. This quickly gave rise to a new cottage industry, as wagon builders would take a truck or large-car chassis and add a simple wooden body with multiple seats and room for luggage. Henry Ford was sharp enough to realize the profit in aftermarket accessories and soon began offering customers his own variety of options they could purchase directly from their Ford dealer to help their T meet whatever demands they had for it, including depot hack bodies. Due to the amount of wood required to build standard Model T bodies, Ford began acquiring vast tracts of hardwood forests in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. With access to seemingly endless supplies of hardwood, it made perfect sense for him to utilize this resources in building and selling the wood depot hack bodies that had been previously handled by the aftermarket, effectively killing off the competition in the process. This 1927 Model T Depot Hack is a charming example that wears an older restoration that has taken on a nice patina over the years. It has not been over restored, instead maintaining the right amount of rugged appeal the Model T possessed when new. This car is from the final year of Model T production, and it is properly presented with simple black paint on the fenders, frame, hood and radiator. The wood presents in very good condition throughout, appearing to be largely original with good fit of the doors, and typically for a depot hack, lacking much in the way of weather protection. The Model T was as much a tool as it was a motor vehicle, and as such, things were kept simple when it came to decoration. Brightwork is limited to nickel headlamp rings, wheel caps, and a MotoMeter, while the accessories include pair of carriage lamps, and a Klaxon horn, with a nice touch being the period New York registration plate. This Model T is mechanically sound, the simple and robust 176 cubic inch L-head engine and planetary transmission being in good working order. It features electric start and has been upgraded with a distributor ignition system for more reliable running. Wooden “artillery” wheels are shod with all black tires which are in good condition. The four-cylinder’s 22 horsepower is more than adequate to get the T up and chugging along without much effort. Engine detailing is average, showing some signs of use but overall tidy and well-presented. A pair of bench seats allows room for four or five passengers, with room in the rear for luggage. The vinyl upholstery is in good condition, as are the rubber lined floors. A delightful, enjoyable period piece, this Model T is ready to load up with passengers for runs to the railroad station, freight depot… or perhaps just your favorite local ice cream shop.

    For sale
    $23,500(£0)
  • 1963 Jaguar E-Type Roadster For Sale

    For sale
    $225,000(£0)

    When the time came for Jaguar to replace the ageing XK-150, which traced its roots back to 1948 with the XK-120, Jaguar boss Sir William Lyons relied again on his proven strategy of affordability combined with exotic looks and race-proven technology. Lyons and his chief aerodynamicist Malcolm Sayer worked together to design the new car, which employed a semi-monocoque tub utilizing ingenious bolt-on front subframes to support the engine and independent front suspension, inspired by the Le Mans-winning D-Type. The featured the ingenious modular independent rear suspension with inboard brakes, pioneered on the Mk10. The E-type also boasted such exotic tech as four wheel disc brakes, torsion bar front suspension, and a 3.8 liter version of the XK’s twin-cam inline six pumping out a startling 265 horsepower; numbers one would expect from a car costing twice as much. The all-new E-Type first appeared to a stunned audience at the 1961 Geneva Auto Salon, earning praise from press, public and fellow automakers alike. Along with its impressive mechanical spec, the gorgeous body was quite unlike anything that had been seen before. Beautiful and curvaceous yet with a sporty aggression, the E-Type was a smashing success from day one. Fascinatingly, co-designer Malcolm Sayer had no interest in designing a car based purely on aesthetics, rather, he was far more interested in aerodynamics and applying his experience with the D-Type toward a design that allowed form to follow function. Rather ironically, the E-Type turned out to be not terribly aerodynamically efficient, but became one of the most celebrated aesthetic designs of the 20th century. Thankfully, Jaguar gave it the performance to back up the looks and a well-driven E-type could easily hang with a contemporary Ferrari or Aston Martin, yet it cost a fraction of the price of those exotic machines. The Jaguar E-Type has gone on to become a perennial favorite among enthusiasts, and many collectors consider it a cornerstone of any grouping of significant cars. This striking 1963 Jaguar E-Type 3.8 OTS is an exquisite, fully restored and highly detailed example of the desirable first generation E-Type. This well-documented car is very correct and stunningly presented in its rare, original color combination. According to the Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust Certificate, this car, S/N 879061, was delivered new in May of 1963 to G.W. Baltey of Littleton, Colorado. Subsequent documentation shows the car was purchased out of Colorado by David McFarland of Newcastle, Wyoming in 1973, who sold it to Blaine Hall, also of Wyoming, who owned it until 1982. The next owner, Mr. Scott Waggener of Provo, Utah began a restoration at some point, but then sold it as a partially completed project to Eugene Banks in 1996. While in the care of Mr. Banks, the E-Type received the care it deserved in the hands of experienced Jaguar restorers Lundquist Restorations in Utah. The subsequent restoration, which was completed in 2004, was highly detailed, very correct and done original specification. Today, this wonderful E-Type is presented in gorgeous condition, with excellent panel fit, paint quality and brightwork. The original Sand Beige color suits the E-type’s compound curves splendidly, and this car simply sparkles. The exterior is well detailed with correct fittings and hardware, chrome wire wheels with Vredestien Sprint Classic tires, and a rare US-spec front license plate bracket with a clever mechanism that folds the plate under as the bonnet is opened. The cockpit of the 3.8 liter E-Type is distinguished by its racy fixed-back leather bucket seats and the perforated alloy trim that graces the dash and console. Restored back to factory specification, the tan leather now shows a light patina places but remains in very fine order overall. Correct materials are used throughout the cabin such as Wilton wool carpets, Hardura on the rear bulkhead, and correct vinyl on the sills and door cards. The attention to detail is obvious, as the car retains original-type seat belts, restored original instruments, original switchgear, and a lovely period correct radio. This car features a rare and desirable removable hard top, which has been restored to the same high standard as the rest of the car, as well as the soft top trimmed in black Stayfast canvas and a matching top boot. Many enthusiasts prefer the 3.8 liter engine for its free-revving nature and sweeter feel. This car does not disappoint, spinning freely to redline, and emitting an intoxicating bark from the factory-correct exhaust and feeling solid and planted on the road. The inline-six is finely presented with highly polished cam covers, intake and carburetors, and correct gold painted cylinder head. Details such as the porcelain exhaust manifolds remain in excellent condition, correctly fitted with brass nuts as original. Factory correct wiring, fittings and hardware round out the wonderful under-bonnet presentation. According to the documents, this car retains its original, matching numbers engine block, cylinder head, and frame rails. The sale includes a comprehensive history file, the aforementioned Heritage Certificate, as well as a factory tool kit and jack in the original pouches. Finely restored to a high standard and immensely collectible, this superb Jaguar E-Type 3.8 OTS is equally at home on the road or the show field, a fine example ready for touring, rallies or JCNA events.

    For sale
    $225,000(£0)
  • 1964 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale Coupe For Sale

    For sale
    $149,500(£0)

    At the 1957 Turin Auto Show, Alfa Romeo unveiled its stunning and futuristic Giulietta Sprint Speciale. Penned by Franco Scaglione for Bertone, the S.S. featured a slick, swoopy, and bumperless aerodynamic alloy body fitted with lightweight plexiglass windows and gutsy 1300 cc twin-cam. Scaglione’s drew his inspiration for this gorgeous design from within his own portfolio, as the Sprint Speciale was inspired by the radical and outrageous B.A.T. concept cars that traveled the show circuit earlier in the decade. A minimum of 100 cars was needed to homologate the new model for FIA regulations, and while a handful of them were skinned in aluminum, most production cars were built primarily in steel with alloy used on the doors and deck lids. The first series of the S.S. was built on the 750-series Giulietta chassis, with the 1300cc twin cam engine kept largely standard, aside from updated Weber 40 DCOE3 carburetors and a free-breathing sports exhaust. Standard production Sprint Speciales gained road trim such as bumpers, proper glass windows and enough creature comforts to transform the S.S. into a junior grand touring car; a uniquely stylish alternative to the likes of a Porsche 356 or Austin Healey. For 1963, Alfa Romeo updated their Giulietta line with a host of mechanical improvements, the most significant being the 1600 cc engine, now making 112 horsepower in Sprint Veloce specification. The new car, internally known as the 101-series was named Giulia (a clever play on it being a grown up version of Giulietta), and the Sprint Speciale was carried over; with increased performance from the powerful 1600 engine, as well as a 5-speed gearbox and disc brakes on later models. Comfort was also improved with more luxurious trim. While the Giulia SS did not achieve much in the way of success on the race tracks of the world, it was no less a uniquely beautiful and lively performance car that has earned a place among the most collectible and desirable of all post-war Alfa Romeos. Our featured 1964 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale is a gorgeous and highly desirable late production model that has been sympathetically restored to a high standard, presented in the classic shade of Alfa Red (AR501) over black upholstery. The original Italian registration log book shows this car, S/N AR381099, was first registered on the 22nd of May, 1964 in Milano. Renewal stamps go through approximately 1980 when car was purchased from the original owner and exported to the United States. Sometime after its arrival in the USA, it received a bare metal respray in the lovely shade of red it wears today, and in 2010 it underwent a comprehensive mechanical refurbishment and detailing to concours standards. It presents in excellent condition, the body exhibiting exemplary panel fit and superbly straight body lines topped high quality paintwork. The chrome bumpers and bright trim all present in excellent condition, and much of the glass appears to be in excellent original order. We appreciate the details such as correct Carello headlamps which highlight the careful attention given to ensure the restoration is true to original. Riding on correct original Borrani steel wheels with hub caps and Vredestien Sprint Classic tires, the little Alfa sits beautifully on the road, its magnificent shape quite unlike any other car that has come before or after. As part of the restoration, the interior was sympathetically freshened with new seat covers in correct original black vinyl material, piped in red to match the painted dash. The excellent original door panels were carefully preserved along with interior quarter panels, parcel shelf and the dash top. Fresh black carpets are bound in red and present in fine order. Original gauges and switchgear also appear in very good condition, as does the wonderful original steering wheel with its polished alloy spokes and black rim. The boot is lined with the original rubber mat while the spare wheel, tool roll and fuel filler take up most of the available space. For weekend tours, a generous luggage space is found behind the seats. As a later production model, this Giulia S.S. benefits from the numerous improvements Alfa Romeo made to the 101 series over the course of production. This car is fitted with its correct Veloce specification 101.21 series engine which is mated to a five-speed gearbox as original, as well as front disc brakes. The engine is very well detailed with factory correct paint finishes on the accessories and fittings, as well as period correct decals and labels. With 112 horsepower from the gutsy little twin-cam four and only 2,000 pounds to move around, the Giulia S.S. is an absolute joy to drive, with that typical 1960s Alfa Romeo flair and excitement. This superb Giulia S.S. benefits from a high quality yet sympathetic restoration, and it remains very fine condition both mechanically and cosmetically. Shown at Concorso Italiano in 2010, it was awarded Best 101-series Alfa Romeo in what was no doubt a very crowded and highly competitive field. It runs and drives beautifully, and is ideally suited for driving events such as the New England 1000, Copperstate 1000 or similar rallies and tours. The Sprint Speciale offers the joy that comes with driving any Alfa-Romeo of the period, along with the unmistakably beautiful Bertone styling. Beautifully presented and highly desirable, this Giulia Sprint Speciale will be a most welcome addition to any collection.

    For sale
    $149,500(£0)
  • 1937 Lincoln Model K Panel Brougham

    For sale
    $229,500(£0)

    The prestigious Model K served as Lincoln Motor Car Company’s flagship model throughout the 1930s. When introduced in 1931, the K-series hit the showrooms featuring a new 145-inch wheelbase chassis with power coming via the 348.8 cubic inch V8 engine. While the V8 provided more than adequate performance for most clients, Lincoln was feeling the pressure from Cadillac and Packard to offer an engine of greater than eight cylinders. Ford Motor Company responded to the Cadillac V12 and V16 with its own V12-powered Model KB in 1932. The K-series was then split into two separate ranges, with the KA carrying over the V8 engine and the KB featuring the new 448 cubic inch V12. The early years of the Great Depression meant that sales were slim, but the V12 remained a key part of the Lincoln lineup well into the 1930s, keeping the company at the sharp end of the luxury car market even through those difficult economic times. By 1937, the junior model Zephyr had joined the range as a bridge between top-line Fords and the prestigious Model K. The Zephyr was also powered by a V12 engine, albeit of smaller displacement, but Lincoln continued to offer the Model K for high end buyers, who now had 17 different custom body styles to select from. The basic styling was simple but elegant, with art-deco inspired teardrop headlamps that were faired-in to the streamlined fenders and V-shaped windscreens were fitted on all standard bodies. On the mechanical side, the 414 cubic inch flathead V-12 engine was updated with hydraulic lifters and a revised cam shaft then placed further forward in the chassis to allow for more passenger room. The resulting car was elegant and understated, yet with an imposing presence and performance that demanded attention. Edsel Ford, then in charge of Lincoln, entrusted a select number of coachbuilders to supply catalog bodies for the K-series. Edsel had a keen eye for style, and he partnered with four independent coachbuilders - Judkins, Brunn, Willoughby and LeBaron, whom he had determined offered the kind of quality and style that Lincoln buyers demanded. To minimize overlap, each coachbuilder was assigned a different style. For example, Judkins focused on closed sedans and coupes, while Willoughby of Utica, New York would specialize in limousines, landaulets and town cars of the finest quality. One of Willoughby & Company’s most distinct offerings was the razor-edge style Panel Brougham, as fitted to our featured 1937 Lincoln Model K, chassis number K8376. At $7,050, it was the most lavish and expensive factory catalogued body available and as a result, just nine were built, of which only two are known to survive today. The distinct styling features sweeping door lines that harken to the carriage days, as well as a steeply raked, thin pillar V-windscreen, open driver’s compartment, and an enclosed passenger compartment with sharply creased corners. The period brochure describes the Willoughby Panel Brougham as “An eminently correct motor car for formal use...” Intended to be chauffeur driven, as the driver’s compartment can be opened with the removal of the soft leatherette roof. Customers could opt for plain painted livery or the fabulously intricate hand-painted “caning” as applied to this car. Serial number K8376 is one of just two known survivors to wear this magnificent body style, and it was once part of the illustrious collection of J.C. Whitney founder Roy Warshawsky, who had a particular fondness for Lincoln automobiles. The magnificent restoration was performed by the highly regarded Rick Kriss, and the car scored a Best in Class at the 1988 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance as well as an AACA National First Prize in the same year. Following the dispersing of Warshawsky’s collection, this Lincoln was acquired by Dr. Joseph Murphy of Pennsylvania, who sold it two years later to the renowned collector, General William Lyon. The stately Lincoln remained a fixture of Gen. Lyon’s collection for a decade before joining the most recent owner’s stable of important Full Classic automobiles in 2008. This wonderful Willoughby-bodied Lincoln remains in beautiful condition, clearly having benefitted from years of expert care in the hands of several renowned collectors. The black paint befits the razor-edge styling beautifully, and it remains in excellent condition with just the slightest hint of patina beginning to appear. The gorgeous coachwork is fully accessorized, with dual Senior Trippe Lights, Greyhound mascot, dual sidemount spares with painted covers, dual outside mirrors, and chrome wire wheels with wide-white tires. The presentation is simply beautiful, the restoration having matured slightly, though has obviously been treated to the utmost in care. The driver’s compartment is trimmed in black leather as original, as it is hard wearing and easily maintained for chauffeur duty. The dash retains its original instrumentation and controls, with fabulous art-deco detailing. In the rear, passengers travel in lush accommodations with gray broadcloth upholstery and matching carpeting. The upholstery and fittings remain in excellent condition, belying the years since the restoration was completed. Luxurious details abound such as dual wood-trimmed vanity mirrors, dual ash trays, a roll-down glass division, fabric roller blinds on all windows, foot rests, dual jump seats and a handsome Jaeger 8-day clock. Wood trim and detailing is exemplary, with the car still presenting very much in showable condition. The factory original V12 engine is in fine running order, having been well maintained and sparingly used in the hands of its previous owners. Engine presentation is excellent, befitting a car that is a prior class winner at Pebble Beach. The Model K was renowned in its time for exceptional smoothness and power, and this example lives up to that legacy, performing admirably on the road while exuding a sense of quality and occasion with its fabulous coachwork. A very well-maintained older restoration with important and rare coachwork, this handsome Lincoln Model K is quite well suited for local concours, CCCA or AACA events and would make a most elegant choice for CCCA CARavan tours. Just as it did in 1937, this lavish motorcar exemplifies pre-war grandeur and sophistication.

    For sale
    $229,500(£0)
  • 1948 Delahaye Type 135 M Cabriolet

    For sale
    $695,000(£0)

    In the aftermath of World War II, Delahaye had survived battered but not broken. Until production of their landmark 135-series could resume, the company paid the bills by building commercial trucks and buses. Once the 135M was revised for the post-war climate, however, Delahaye was back in business as one of France’s premier sports car makers. The revised 135M was in essence the same as the pre-war model but it featured a widened track, and more powerful, refined versions of the same 3,558 c.c. six-cylinder engine, with output as high as 160 horsepower in ultimate specification. As it had before the war, Delahaye partnered with many great French coachbuilders such as Chapron, Franay, and Letourner & Marchand to skin its fabulous 135M chassis. But it was the work of Figoni et Falaschi that made the biggest impact on Delahaye’s image. The partnership was in many ways, the ideal marriage of the flamboyant high-style of Figoni, and the engineering excellence of Delahaye. Giuseppe “Joseph” Figoni was born in Italy in 1894, and immigrated to France with his parents when he was just three years old. As a teenager, he apprenticed with a carriage-maker before serving in the French military for seven years. In 1923, he opened his own body repair shop in Boulogne and quickly won the admiration of clientele who called upon his skills for not only repairs, but also for his ability to perform modifications to suit his clients’ wishes. Inevitably, this grew into a full-fledged carrosserie by 1925. He exhibited a natural talent for proportions and detailing, continuing to build upon his reputation for high quality craftsmanship. In 1935, Figoni partnered with Ovidio Falaschi, a Tuscan businessman with a penchant for fast, stylish motorcars. Falaschi’s financial backing allowed Figoni to experiment with increasingly flamboyant designs, yet he managed to maintain his fine sense of balance and proportion. The Goutte d’Or (literally “drop of gold”) coupe on a Talbot T-150 marked his arrival as a true Avant Garde stylist, one that would attract the attention of the world’s elite figures. One such figure was T’hami El Glaoui, who served as the Pasha of Marrakesh. El Glaoui was an influential figure in Moroccan politics, which was a French held colony at the time. His powerful stature in the caste system and his sympathetic stance with the French government afforded him many business opportunities at home and abroad; enough to amass a huge fortune that at one point topped $50M. El Glaoui enjoyed the fruits of his fortune, indulging in multiple palaces and the finest of French automobiles. In the late 1940s, T’hami El Glaoui commissioned Figoni et Falaschi to construct a body atop a Delahaye 135M chassis. The resulting design was a handsome, four seat GT car that featured a three-position cabriolet top with external pram irons, and elegant, full-figured proportions. It was almost understated, yet still retained just enough of the typical Figoni drama with its chrome flashes and curvaceous details. The design proved quite popular with Figoni’s other clients, and he would go on to build a series of approximately 18 cars, built on a common theme though with each example slightly different from the next. This 1948 Delahaye 135M, S/N 801620, is one of those original El Glaoui series cabriolets, believed to the last in the series of 18 cars and one of just 9 known to survive today. Originally, S/N 801620 was ordered by an Englishman, Mr. B. Grieg after he visited the Paris Auto Salon and fell in love with what he saw on the Delahaye stand. At great cost, he ordered his 135M with a Figoni et Falaschi body, on the assurance it would be unique. While each car in the El Glaoui series was built to a common theme, they were indeed unique in detail, particularly in the treatment of the front end, the shape of the grille and differing chrome embellishments on the body sides. It is believed that Mr. Grieg felt his car wasn’t as unique as he had hoped for, but regardless, he enjoyed it for a number of years in his native England. In the 1960s, it then became part of the collection of fellow Englishman Mr. Hubert Rees. Mr. Rees then sold the car in 1971 to A.K. Wilson, a Toronto-based enthusiast and connoisseur of French motorcars. Following Wilson’s passing, the Delahaye joined the collection of William Anderson of Massachusetts who oversaw its restoration and subsequently showed the car in multiple events around the country, earning a CCCA National First Prize along the way. It then passed through two very significant collections, that of Judge Joseph Cassini and then to James Patterson of Louisville, KY, before most recently becoming part of an important private collection of coachbuilt French automobiles. Today, 801620 presents in stunning condition in the elegant livery of black over a lush red interior. Paint and body quality are exceptional, the car having been preserved in superlative condition since its restoration. Fit and finish are outstanding, and the brightwork presents in fine order. On this car, the archetypal Figoni “sweepspear” treatment is toned down in favor of linear chrome accents on the body sides, while the black Stayfast three-position top, black wall Michelin tires and chrome wire wheels lend a particular subdued elegance to this exquisite automobile. The cockpit, which is trimmed in lush red leather, shows only the slightest creasing from use but remains supple and beautifully presented. The steering wheel and dash are finished in a lighter shade of red as original, and it of course retains all original instrumentation including the original Phillips Radio. The rear seats are quite usable for additional passengers, making this a fine choice for touring or concours events alike. With the top fully open, the windscreen can be folded forward to transform this elegant drophead into a full-fledged sports car. The original, matching-numbers engine (number 801620) features triple carburetor specification and is mated to a conventionally shifted four-speed transmission, eliminating the maintenance intensive nature of the alternative pre-selector. In keeping with the rest of this car, the engine is beautifully detailed with proper finishes, correct hardware and correctly presented ancillaries. The same goes for the undercarriage which, again, is fully detailed and exceptionally clean as one would expect from a concours-quality restoration such as this. This is a rare opportunity to acquire a beautiful, fully-restored example of the highly desirable Figoni et Falaschi El Glaoui Cabriolet. One of only 9 known to exist and understood to be the final of the series, this magnificent automobile is presented in exquisite condition and is suitable for virtually any major concours event or tour the world over.      

    For sale
    $695,000(£0)
  • 1928 DeSoto Special

    For sale
    $68,500(£0)

    The American racing scene in the 1920s and 1930s drew huge crowds to places like Allentown, Pennsylvania, Syracuse, New York and the Iowa State Fairgrounds where locals watched their favorite drivers pilot their home-built specials in heroic wheel-to-wheel action at speeds approaching 100mph on dirt ovals. These weekly events often had huge attendance and this unique brand of dirt racing was one of the most popular and exciting spectator sports of the era. While each discipline of motorsport has its own requirements, the basic tenet of race car building has always remained the same – strip away the fat and leave behind only what’s necessary to go fast; and the classic American dirt oval race car is one of the best examples of that formula. Oval racing really took off in the 1950s, when manufacturers like Kurtis and Hillegass began to offer standard chassis built to accept Offenhauser four-cylinder engines. But before the advent of the “production” race chassis, most racers built their own light, purposeful machines based on everyday road cars. The most advanced of these dirt trackers sported cut-down, single seat bodywork, narrowed frames, and solid front and rear axles. The Ford Model T and Model A were the obvious choice as they were cheap and plentiful, with aftermarket speed parts such as OHV conversions available to eek every bit of power out of the four-cylinder engines. But the rules of racing at the time allowed for vast creativity, and virtually any conceivable combination of chassis and engine. The more creative car builders sometimes looked beyond Ford in their quest for greater power, speed and glory. This 1928 DeSoto Special is a charming example of the sort of car that would thunder around the fairgrounds dirt-track scene in the late 1930s. This gorgeous special is a beautifully restored car in period appropriate livery that captures the essence of early American motorsport in its wide stance and purposeful, pared-down appearance. While many of the cars from this period were fitted with ubiquitous Ford engines, this car is unusual in that it features Chrysler flat-head six-cylinder power. The 170 cubic inch Chrysler six might not seem like the obvious choice for a dirt-tracker, but this compact flat-head six was good for 45 horsepower in standard DeSoto trim, and was similar to the engine that powered the Chrysler Model 72 to a surprising 3rd place finish at LeMans in 1928, so there is little doubt it was up to the task. For race duty, this example sports an Edmunds dual-carb intake topped by twin Zenith carburetors. Exhaust is expelled through a single chrome straight pipe which has developed some pleasing bluing numerous heat cycles. The little six sounds just fantastic in this configuration, emitting a baritone bellow from the straight exhaust. We can only imagine how great it would sound at full chat, kicking up a rooster tail of dirt as it slides around a flat-track at speed. The pretty bodywork epitomizes the classic American dirt-racer – a narrow, single seater with the classic upright, cut down cockpit that gives the driver the room and leverage to saw wildly at the wheel while chucking the car around at speed. The presentation is quite lovely, with fine quality cream-yellow paint that is accented with bright red wire wheels, red seat and hand painted, period-type lettering. The car presents with fabulous detailing such as the cut-down chrome grille and the chromed from axle. The older restoration has aged quite well, with high quality finishes and brightwork remaining in very good condition. Mechanically, this is a proper bare-bones dirt racer. The gutsy little six-cylinder sends power rearward via direct drive, with no need for a power-sapping transmission. Braking is handled by an outside lever connecting the rear-wheel mechanical brakes, which aid in setting the car up for big power slides. Knobby rear tires bite the dirt while ribbed fronts provide a bit of help when steering - though any real dirt-tracker knows that most of the steering is done with the right foot! As with many racing cars from the late pre-war and early post-war period, this car’s competition history has been lost to time, but it remains an alluring period piece that would be a worthy addition to most any collection. It would also be a very welcome sight in vintage dirt track racing, or with groups such as the Classic Racing Times who promote and celebrate the preservation of classic American oval racing cars such as this. Simply as an aesthetic period piece, this DeSoto special is a beautiful creation that would be at home in virtually any collection, but for the enthusiast courageous enough to take it to the track, it will surely provide unrivaled thrills.

    For sale
    $68,500(£0)