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Historic Competition Services Cars for sale

15 Search results
  • Lagonda LG45

    €325,000(£286,910)

    Lagonda LG45 Team Car When Fox and Nicholl prepared three M45’s as Team Cars for the 1934 RAC Tourist Trophy at Ards, they did a rather nice job. So good, Fox convinced the board of Directors of Lagonda to enter two M45 team cars in the 24 hours of Le Mans. Luckily, all was ok despite financial disturbances and 24hours later, one of them won the 24 hours of le mans in 1935, bringing fame and glory to not only Fox and Nichol but certainly to Lagonda. Shortly after, Lagonda was in big financial trouble and a new investor was needed urgently. Alan Good managed to buy the company and just outbid Rolls Royce. Rolls Royce, who recently purchased Bentley Motors, wasn’t very impressed. They were even less impressed by the fact that Alan managed to seduced W.O. Bentley to work for Lagonda. Bentley was given more freedom again and was given room to let him do what he does best, developing cars and engines. Alan Good decided to take all of the existing Lagonda models off the market in favour of bringing a renewed model on the market, the LG45 Lagonda. LG or ‘Lagonda Good’ motors, as it was called after the takeover, started from the M45 team car engine and developed it to give more horsepower and an even smoother ride. The 6cylinder inline 4467cc meadows engine was upgraded in 4 ‘sanctions’ or batches, 1,2 and 3 for the LG45 and the forth designated for a new model, the Lagonda LG6. The LG45 had a revised chassis of the M45 but with softer springing and Girling brakes. The body shapes became more simple and more luxurious. It is not a secret that a lot of those fine automobiles survived time in very nice condition due to this quality. LG45’s had different innovative options like built-in hydraulic jacks on 4 wheels like many DTM racers have now. Double batteries and fuel pumps for reliability were also standard equipment. Even metallic paints could be ordered from the factory, a built-in radio was another ‘gadget’ that was available. Not only the option list was extensive, also the range of body styles to choose from was not kept minimal. Top of the bill was the LG45 Rapide and the LG45 Team Car, you also had the gorgeous LG45 Drophead Coupe, the LG45 Tourer and the wonderful LG45 Saloon. Fox & Nicholl built four special LG45s Team Cars to carry on the good work of the previous year, two 2 seaters and two 4 seaters. However, Le Mans was not run in 1936 and the 2 seaters ran in the French G P instead (for sports cars that year). ‘Our’ car is an homage to this wonderful LG45 Team Car. It is an extremely close copy of one of the four seater team cars into the finest details. The engine has been upgraded to 180BHP and will put its power down via the full synchronised Alvis gearbox. The spare wheel has been moved to the side of the car, which allows you to have more than enough luggage space in the booth and the ‘back seat’. Together with double fuel pumps, original double bronze housed carburettors electrical fan and big glass windscreen, the car is capable to do any rally. Are you hesitating to do the flying Scotsman, the Terra di Canossa or other international rallies, this is the car for you. Only 150 LG45s of all types survived out of a production of 278 (and none of the two ‘ seater team cars) so be quick, it is a very rare car. Especially in this condition and this level of attention to details. http://www.historic-competitionservices.eu/nl/lagonda-lg45-team-car

    Last update: 4 Days Old
    • Year: 1936
    • Engine size: 4.5
    For sale
    Historic Competition Services
  • Delage D6

    €325,000(£286,910)

    1930 was the year that Delage introduced the D6 model range. The 6-cylinder engine was mainly developed for Delage’s luxury cars whose lifespan continued even after World War II until 1953. Starting with a 2001cc 6-cylinder, the engine size increased over time to a 3-litre Postwar engine and so did the power output. Wonderful coach builds were made on these Delages and the make became known for its fabulous automobiles with the D8, 4litre 8- Cylinder, as the pinnacle of a flamboyant luxury car. In the late 30’s, Delage started racing with the D6. First with the D6-70TT, later with the evolution of that car, the Delage D6-75TT. These Delages share the Cotal gearbox and front suspension with the Delahaye race cars, “not a bad thing at all”. The original Cotal gearbox is a superb piece of engineering. Imagine it as a semi-automatic electronic prewar ‘tiptronic’. Very light, easy to work with and no grinding of gears, making it loved by amateurs and racing drivers alike. The Delage we present you is the later and fully developed D6-75TT. Starting life as a regular D6-75, the Grand Prix body was made in the ‘70’s and the engine received all the special racing bits. Fitted with three period downdraft Stromberg carburettors, the uprated inlet manifold, uprated exhaust manifold and system all adding up to about 160bhp. This car is very very fast indeed and has raced all of its life, been entered on many international rallies around the world, and completing the Mille Miglia just last May as start number 148. The engine is currently being professionally rebuilt and will be in perfect fresh condition ready for its next owner. Be quick, this car will sell as fast as it drives! http://www.historic-competitionservices.eu/nl/delage-d6-75tt

    Last update: 3 Months Old
    • Year: 1939
    • Engine size: 2.8
    For sale
  • Ferrari 365

    €265,000(£233,942)

    Introduced in 1967, the Ferrari 365 GT 2+2 was the successor of the 330 series. The lines, unmistakably designed by Pininfarina, making it a beautiful and timeless Grand Tourer. Production started in 1968 and only continued until 1971 after 801 Ferrari’s were made. With the new design of Pininfarina, also new technical features were brought into the car. The 365 was equipped from standard with power steering and brakes, electrical windows and self levelling independent rear suspension. All of this making the car a leading example in luxury. If you combine this with the legendary 4.4 litre ‘Colombo’ V12, you will have a car that will go “Rather Well”. With 330 BHP in the front, it is one of the classical Ferrari setups and a well-proven success. This car in particular has received some love from the last owner. New clutch, New tyres, new paintjob and a complete service of the engine, carburetors and fuel system along with a complete checkover, bringing it completely up to expected standards. This 365 is a very nice example in a wonderful and yet elegant colour setting. Jump in an let the scenery slide past you while you carve through the landscape, 365 GT days of the year. http://www.historic-competitionservices.eu/nl/ferrari-365-gt-2-2

    Last update: 6 Days Old
    • Year: 1970
    • Engine size: 4.4
    For sale
  • Bentley 4.25-Litre

    €575,000(£507,610)

    ONE-OFF BENTLEY 4 1/4 LITRE VESTERS & NEIRINCK, COACHBUILT DROP HEAD COUPE This chassis was produced in February 1937 and shipped on 12-3-'37 to Ets. Pisart, 52 Boulevard de Waterloo in Brussels (now domicile of Polo by Ralph Lauren) for showroom use. A gentleman M. Pater bought the rolling chassis and commissioned a 3 position drop head coupe body at Vesters et Neirinck, 105 Rue du Foyer de Schaerbeekois, a 15 minutes’ walk from his house at 91 rue Metsys in Schaerbeek (Brussels). From 8-19 January B137JY was Vesters & Neirincks' show car at the 1938 Brussels motor show (29st Salon de l'automobile et du cycli). M. Pater took delivery of the car on, 4 May 1938. The chassis card describes the following features delivered with the rolling chassis, one Ace Cornercroft spare wheel cover and 5 wheel discs, a speedometer in kilometers and a petrol gauge in litres. All lamps such as headlamps, fog lamps and taillights are from the Belgium manufacture, Willocq Bottin. All the above features are still on the car at present. The famous Bentley coupe from collector Claude Lang was also built at Vesters & Neirinck in the same months, which is visible in several details. Vesters & Neirinck were one of the top coachbuilders on the Bentley chassis before the war, most of them are still in existence due to their high value and wonderfully crafted design. How B137 JY has survived WWII has to be sorted out, but the fact is that the car turned up in the USA in 1964 at Keith M. Merrick of Sibley Ohio. Then moved in 1967 to Kansas City, where it stayed until it was auctioned in September 1987, where after it came via Classic automobiles to the hands of Anthony Gervis from Stourport on Severn. As the engine was in poor condition when collected in London, mr. Gervis decided to bring the car to Haines and Hall where they then decided to restore the whole car. After spending much money and effort from May 1988 until August 1990 including an engine, brakes and electricity overhaul. mr. Gervis then decided to bring his car in 1991 to Ian Pinder from RR&B in Bromsgrove, very near to where he lives down. They carried out an extensive body-off retrim for £69.000 finished in October 1991. At that stage the odometer read 57.645 kilometers. The present owner bought the car in May 1999 the odometer read 62.646 kilometers. After the first kilometers he asked RR&B to fit an overdrive. The car has been used for some major trips through Europe and even 5000 kilometers through South Africa in 2003 organized by John White from the Bentley drivers club. The car has been seen many times at the annual rallies from the Bentley Drivers Club as well as the Rolls Royce Owners Club. B137 JY won in total 14 trophies, in the beginning second in class but the owner learned fast and was aiming to be first in class resulting several times in 96 points. Even achieving a “best in show” (the P & A Wood trophy) the last trophies were in June 2015 at the RREC annual rally at Burghley house, where he was awarded with “most elegant” and “first in class” again with 96 points! All big and small factory fitted tools are complete and with the car. As the overdrive made a strange noise and the professionals claimed that this kind of overdrive did not properly fit under a Derby Bentley the overdrive has been changed by an high ratio axle (3.64:1) in 2011. All maintenance since 2003 has been carried by Ken Lea. The car is in top condition and ready to drive or show. http://www.historic-competitionservices.eu/nl/bentley-4-1-4l-vesters---neirinck-coachbuilt-drop-head-coupe-one-off

    Last update: 6 Days Old
    • Year: 1937
    • Engine size: 4.3
    For sale
  • Talbot-Lago T26

    €425,000(£375,190)

    This Very special Talbot Lago T26 was sold to it’s first owner a Mr Amiel in the Perpignan area in France in 1947, It was apparently supplied with no bodywork and in chassis and engine form for a bespoke bodywork to be supplied by the customer. The chassis is shortened and the car was supplied with extremely rare Racing parts such as a complete racing specification GS engine with aluminium head, special Weber DCO3 Carburetors, aluminium wide sump, special competition GS brakes with enormous aluminium drums, a GP specification gearbox and numerous other “works type” modifications. Mr Amiel owned the car until around 1970 when it was sold to a Mr Mette in south West France, We have a letter on file from the son of the second owner who was interviewed a few years back and states that he remembers the car quite clearly when his farther bought it, as a rough and rather ugly sports car that went very quickly indeed! (exactly as it is today) His farther used it a little but kept it mostly on display in a Museum in the south of France until it closed. The car was then taken back and used occasionally before selling to a dealer in the early 80’s. The car went through the hands of a few more dealers before ending up in Belgium with a gentleman who kept the car for many years, driving it and racing it in club level events including the Brussels Grand Prix and numerous other events. Now it is in the collection of a well-known Dutch enthusiast who competed successfully in the 2015 and 2016 Mille Miglia with the car. Only for sale now due to a change of plans. We don’t know much detail about it’s early (pre 1970) life other than the name of the owner, and that it was supplied with no bodywork. We have had the car inspected by well-known Talbot-Lago expert Tony Bianchi who states in another letter we have on file, that the chassis has been shortened extremely professionally and it actually took him more than an hour to find out where it was actually shortened, the work has been done in such a way as to suggest it could have been done at the factory. As the engine is the original one supplied by the factory and is of such a high specification with the full GS spec aluminium cylinder head and sump etc, and fitted with the original racing option of three Weber 45 DCO3 carburetors and large GS racing brakes, there seems a very likely possibility that the car was always intended for racing. We feel that the bodywork was probably re-made during the latter part of Amiel’s ownership as it is made poorly and of steel, we presume that the original racing body was damaged and that Amiel later had the body re-made by a local garage / handyman sometime before selling it. We cannot imagine that the mechanical work which is of such high standard was done by the same hands. Quick research has unfortunately not given us any answers. Some serious investigation and research hopefully would reveal the answers. Unfortunately we nor the current owner has the time for this. The car drives extremely well and is very fast with good handling and very good brakes as you can imagine from a car of this specification. Imagine how fast it would have been with its original aluminium bodywork! http://www.historic-competitionservices.eu/nl/talbot-lago-t26--amiel-

    Last update: 6 Days Old
    • Year: 1947
    • Engine size: 4.5
    For sale
  • Alvis 4.3-Litre

    €220,000(£194,216)

    Purpose built Alvis 4.3l Rally special, ready to take on the next Flying Scotsman and other endurance rallies. A promise for years of fun in this wonderful handling car with more than enough power. The car has been tested on many rallies and has been proven faultless. With it's synchronized gearbox it is very easy for every driver.

    Last update: 4 Days Old
    • Year: 1939
    • Engine size: 4.3
    For sale
  • Mercedes-Benz 280SL

    €115,000(£101,522)

    In 1963 on the Geneva Motor show, the all new W113, Mercedes 'Pagoda' 230SL was introduced. Its very sleek and elegant design introduced a complete new Design wind within Mercedes. Beautifully designed by Paul Bracq, Béla Barényi and Friedrich Geiger, the design brought airiness, roominess and elegant timeless lines and was well appreciated by the public. Production of the Mercedes W113 commenced in June 1963 with the 230sl. Living up to the heritage of its predecessors, the infamous 300sl and the smaller 190sl, was a big task. However, with the uprated 250SL in 1966 and the biggest, 280sl model in 1967, it was a top selling product in the very high end luxury market and lived up to the task extremely well. The formula seemed to be a great success and the W113 Pagoda has iconic status today. The Pagoda is one of the most sought after 2-door sports roadsters for Sunday cruises as well for the heavier rally work. The top model, the 280sl, propels you with ease to 200km/h with the 170 horses underneath the bonnet. With an empty weight of 1360kg, the power to weight ratio can be called ' very sporty' and great fun! The car we offer you for sale is one of those 7.935 280SL units produced in 1970. It has been restored to very high standards and is almost new from top to bottom. It comes with the very desirable hard top, making it a very comfortable 'winter' car as well as a wonderful summer convertible cruiser. This example is the nicer European spec model, preserving the elegant lines and front headlight lenses. The white steering wheel, will give you that same high end feeling when you will sit in the new interior listening to the original Becker Mexico radio. The only thing you have to think of, is to put it in Drive. The automatic gearbox will do the rest. With a lovely summer coming up, you absolutely cannot be without this car. Capable of cruising to the Côte d'Azur or an speedy local rally, this Pagode in absolute stunning colour setting is the one to have. Please come over and inspect the car. We are convinced that you want to take it home after a test drive. http://www.historic-competitionservices.eu/nl/mercedes-280sl-pagoda

    Last update: 6 Days Old
    • Year: 1970
    • Engine size: 2.8
    For sale
  • Lagonda 2-Litre Speed Model

    €120,000(£105,936)

    LAGONDA 2 LITRE CONTINENTAL 3 POSITION DHC VANDEN PLAS English band leader, musical entrepreneur and composer Ray Noble was born in 1903. As an advisor and conductor at His Master’s Voice from 1929, he became a household name all over the world when, in 1932, he took over the famous Lew Stone band with which he recorded prolifically for HMV in the years to follow. The band, which included such famous stars as trumpeter Nat Gonella and vocalist Al Bowlly was not only a first class dance ensemble but a hot jazz band as well. Noble’s successes allowed him to afford an expensive automobile and in the autumn of 1932, he ordered this Lagonda “Continental” with a special “Three position Drophead Coupé” coachwork by the famous coachbuilders Vanden Plas. Vanden Plas is known for very bespoke coachbuilding on expensive car manufacturers such as Alvis, Armstrong Siddeley, Bentley, Lagonda, Daimler and Rolls Royce. In 1925, the Lagonda factory began production of the 2 litre model and after round about 300 cars, production seized in 1933. In that period they only produced 25 “continental” or “Speed” 2 Litres (distinguishable by the slanting radiator) of which this is the only one originally fitted with this DHC body. Not only the link with Ray Noble and the speed model makes it very special automobile but the fact that is was fitted with a full synchronized gearbox from birth, makes it a very unique example indeed! Ray Noble took delivery of the car in early 1933 and it was registered JJ 8897 in his name, at his London office address at 47 Lower Belgrave Street,on the 2nd March of that year. 1933 was also the year that Ray Noble band made their only tour of a foreign country; they did a summer engagement at the Kurhaus hotel in Schevingen, Holland. Ray Noble left his band and went to the USA in 1934 and was so successful (also as composer of several famous tunes, such as “The very Thought of you”) that he decided to stay. He therefore offered the Lagonda for sale in the summer of 1935. The car has a full history and all subsequent owners are known. Ray Noble had a long and successful career in America which lasted until the late 1960’s when he retired to the channel island of Jersey. He died in 1978. The present owner bought the car in 2015 after it had been stored for more than 15 years. When the car was pushed out from its storage and a new battery was fitted, the engine started at the first attempt (on very stale petrol!) The car is largely in untouched and original condition except that it has had a recent respray; the previous paintwork not being the original had become very tatty and it was decided to repaint the car in its original colour of two tone green. A new hood has also been fitted, the previous one having largely deteriorated. If you are looking for a very special piece of history and a wonderful car to drive, please do not look further and come pay us a visit. This Lagonda is really special and with a full synchronized gearbox also very easy to drive! http://www.historic-competitionservices.eu/nl/1933-lagonda-2-litre-continental-3-position-dhc-vanden-plas

    Last update: 6 Days Old
    • Year: 1933
    • Engine size: 2
    For sale
  • Frazer Nash Boulogne

    €260,000(£229,528)

    Short History. Chassis 1118 Original Registration number PH 3870 (still registered as such today) According to Denis Jenkinson’s book ‘Frazer Nash: from Chain Drive to Turbocharger’, chassis no. 1118 was released from the Works in May 1927 as an Anzani-powered Boulogne. The car was supplied by AFN to first owner Robert Lawrence ‘Bobby’ Bowes, racer and aviator, later Lancaster pilot and 144’ Rhodesia ‘ Squadron Leader. A quote from the Frazer Nash Club historian, Robin Hildyard states that ‘apart from the side rails’ which were heavily drilled and lightened, and would never have stood continued use, Car #1118 is believed to be made from what remains of Capt. Clive Gallop’s 1925 Boulogne Grand Prix winning car Ch#1048 after it was retired from racing. It was a well-known practice of the Works to use whatever parts they had at hand when they needed selling a new car in a hurry or preparing a particular car for racing. Bowes was more or less a Works-driver, so it is quite possible that he had the ‘privilege’ of receiving a two year old racing car made into a brand new “customer” car. The car is reported as a 1929 Ards Tourist Trophy Works entry, crewed by Bowes and Plunket-Greene: it was a DNF due to overheating. The Meadows engine is believed to have been transplanted at the time. The mounting holes for the Anzani are clearly visible on the chassis. Also, the radiator surround is of a very early cast-aluminum type and very rarely found on other than the works cars. Plunket-Greene was the son of a famous Irish baritone and married G.B. Shaw’s daughter. Their son Alexander married Mary Quant, so an interesting conversation piece. The car was re-bodied by the factory in 1928 as a very pretty special light weight saloon , one of the only three FN saloons known (one built on a new chassis ‘Owlet’, and the remaining two converted on existing cars). David Thirlby has detailed these facts in his book on the Marque. 1118 suffered body damage during WW2: it was partly damaged in a bombing while in a shed at the airfield. The roof of the shed fell on the car and its saloon body was subsequently scrapped. The car was dismantled for reparation but this did not happen until well after the war had finished. A very well-known car with the Club and fully recognized by it, 1118 was extensively raced with great success by Bill Roberts, for many years Captain of the Frazer Nash Car Club. The car was then raced by Steve Stanton, again with great success and it was used for Raids, notably the 1998 Raid to Bolzano of the FNCC, where it performed faultlessly. The car was bought in 2003 by its current owner: the engine was completely rebuilt by Steve Stanton at Stanton Motorsports and everything else overhauled. All the original parts are there. The engine was refreshed by Steve in 2014 after a few hillclimbs and other events in Europe, in particular the 2010 Alpenfahrt and Vernasca 2011 and 2012: the car has been maintained regardless of cost and it is in top condition with marvellous patina. It is portrayed in this year Frazer Nash Car Club Calendar. It comes with FIVA-passport and VSCC-Buff form. Specification. Early Meadows engine, 94 BHP, twin 1 ½” SUs, distributor conversion, electric fuel pump. Now tuned for torque, more BHPs are to be found if required for circuit racing although you would need to be a bit crazy to want more power than this in such a light car. New oil pump and water pump fitted. Oil catch tank. Alu rad-blind for cold weather use. Original bevel box with dipstick modification, 1.5” rear axle, short 4th gear now fitted for hillclimbing, cruising 4th gear included in the spares package. Blakeney Motorsport rear axle strengthening brace now fitted, so the axle has now three instead of only two bearings. New rear hubs and bearings. Reverse lock. New clutch, Borg&Beck type. Original steering box. Rod brakes (extremely powerful). Hartford shockabsorbers just renewed. Springs cleaned , re-set and re-fitted. All suspension parts inspected and renewed where necessary. Spare Parts - Six tyres, Dunlop and Blockleys: assorted tubes - 3 standard rims - original plywood floorboards: New aluminium ones were made for racing but someone may prefer the look of wood on a 1927 car - several lengths of chain, old and new : when changing a chain, new and old chain must be mixed to avoid excessive stretching - special chain-grease (chains must be boiled in molten grease every year) - Touring - tonneau cover with big pocket for spare wheel - original and very big fuel tank - original Lucas h/lamps, stays and fittings - original Lucas front side lamps - original number plates - 4th gear split-sprocket, high ratio! - assorted small bits and bobs, including 'wrong' bellmouth intakes for the SUs Competition cycle wings now fitted, original swept wings included in the sale with fittings. Small safety tank (30lt) and original tank with fittings included in the spares package. Aluminium under tray with Quick release Small headlamps fitted, original Lucas brass lamps with fittings and wire harness included in the spares package. All original instruments and working, rev counter cable recently replaced : original red leatherette seats , squabs just re-stuffed. Original tonneau-cover + Raid-tonneau cover with large zipped additional pocket. Race – approved rear red lamp. Kill switch and fire extinguisher. http://www.historic-competitionservices.eu/nl/1927-frazer-nash-boulogne

    Last update: 6 Days Old
    • Engine size: 1.5
    For sale
  • Bentley 4.5-Litre (1927-31)

    POA

    Registration: PN 1562 Engine number: S-MR3396 Fitted with factory correct Bentley Supercharger. Chassis Number: TX3227 According to the information available in the latest edition of the amazingly detailed, 3 volume, Bentley “Bible” by Clare Hay. Bentley Chassis number TX3227 is believed to have left the factory in 1928 as an original 4.5 Litre Bentley built with a Harrison 4 seater open body, and is recorded to have been sold by to a British army officer, a certain Major Abercromby in 1932. 1949 - The car was rebuilt and the chassis seems to have been damaged around this time as it was changed to Ch#976 and all the major mechanical parts transferred, the car was then re-registered as JOP 873. 1961 - JOP 873 was then again rebuilt back to PN 1562 using the correct length 10’ 10” chassis as per the original car in 1928, the original engine, gearbox and axle etc from TX3227 – PN 1562 were all re-fitted. 2004 – Around this time PN 1562 was sold to a new owner with no bodywork and was then fitted with the Le Mans type body it wears today, it was also rebuilt with a new engine by Neil Davies, uprated to 5.3 Litre and fitted with his fantastic Birkin type Supercharger and all associated parts to full Factory “Blower Bentley” Specification. This car is restored to top specification and has around 250 BHP with more than 450nm Torque. At full power, You need to be a real Man to handle this baby!! You can get your wife a McLaren or a La Ferrari (I think the La is short for “Lady’s” :o) but keep this beast for the Bentley Boys. http://www.historic-competitionservices.eu/nl/1928-bentley-blower

    Last update: 6 Days Old
    • Year: 1928
    • Engine size: 5.3
    For sale
  • Mercedes-Benz 290

    POA

    1935 MERCEDES-BENZ 290B SPEZIAL ROADSTER What more do we need to say, just look at this amazing bodywork, The attention to detail and those lines, German Quality! The car was constructed in 1935 as a Mercedes 290 Sedan which was used as a limousine / demonstration car for the Daimler-Benz sales office in Berlin, Germany. The Mercedes served a very large role in the sales in Köningsberg for Daimler-Benz and was used in several bespoke events. Not much later, the car was sold to ‘Royal Highness Prince Albrecht of Bavaria’ and he drove the car to his palace in Leuchtenberg in Munich where it unfortunately also stayed during the war. A couple of years ago, the car was restored by very high standards with a very fine eye for detail. Sadly, the heavy steel sedan body was so badly damaged by the war that it was beyond repair. The owner chose for this lightweight aluminium flamboyant Spezial Roadster body instead. With those elegant sweeping lines, not a bad choice. The complete car was restored to the last nut and bolt a couple of years ago (so literally the car is in Concours condition from top to bottom) and hasn’t driven much since. Still matching numbers and stated as 1935 Mercedes 290B Spezial roadster on the German documents. The meaning of Magnificence! http://www.historic-competitionservices.eu/nl/mercedes-benz-290b-spezial-roadster

    Last update: 6 Days Old
    • Year: 1935
    For sale
  • Mercedes-Benz 220

    €180,000(£158,904)

    In 1951, Mercedes introduced its 220 series. Together with the flagship 300 series, these were the first post-war Mercedes with a complete new and cutting-edge 6-cylinder engine. Sporty performance, a comfortable ride and an superb looking bodywork. What else would you looking for? You could choose between the 220 Limousine, the 220 Cabriolet A (2 + 2), the Cabriolet B (4 seater) and the 220 Coupe that was inspired by the Cabriolet A. The car we show you here, is in our opinion the prettiest of them all: the Cabriolet A. With its elegant back, streamlined headlights and beautiful colour combination, it is a very desirable car. Only 1278 Cabriolet ‘A’s were ever produced before the Mercedes Ponton took over, With many lost over the years this makes it really quite a rare car indeed. Very reliable, more than enough room for luggage and a very willing engine, this is your ideal partner for a Sunday trip as well for a rally to Italy. The car is completely restored with a great of eye for detail. Very easy starting and great reliability making this a perfect car to drive with confidence for a long trip. The car comes complete with the original jack, spare wheel, etc and is completely matching numbers. If you fancy a nice convertible you can enjoy over the coming summer, this is the car to have! http://www.historic-competitionservices.eu/nl/mercedes-220-a-cabriolet-w187-1954

    Last update: 6 Days Old
    • Year: 1954
    • Engine size: 2.2
    For sale
  • Rolls-Royce Wraith

    €110,000(£97,108)

    Chassis Number: WMB 11 Engine Number: WXA 1 Registration Number: FLW 7 Highlights: • Built for Rolls-Royce's managing director – Sir Arthur F. Sidgreaves OBE - with input from the Rolls Royce Experimental Department • Sidgreaves requested that `FLW 7' feature an uprated engine (carried over from his previous Wraith chassis WXA1) • With the engine including some Bentley Mk V modifications a 1939 comparison with a standard Wraith showed this engine to produce 10% more power than standard and as an “experimental car”, as “significantly lighter”. • Bodied as a lightweight Special Saloon by Park Ward using a steel support frame • Fitted with an electric division, Perspex roof over the driver / front passenger, Smiths `Hades' heater, Philco radio set and leather upholstery • Post War owned by three Rolls Royce directors - Baron Ernest Hives, Chairman of Rolls Royce; Captain Eric Smith, Chairman Rolls Royce; and A G Elliot, Joint Managing Director, Rolls Royce • Subsequently owned by Sir Frederick Arthur Montague “Boy” Browning, the husband of the novelist Daphne du Maurier, Sir Brian Warren, physician to Winston Churchill and Ted Heath, and Dame Josephine Barnes, the first woman President of the British Medical Association. • Recently extensively recommissioned, painted in corniche maroon and re-trimmed. Driving superbly The Wraith was ordered by Sir Arthur F Sidgreaves OBE, Chairman of Rolls Royce, who took delivery of chassis WMB 11 in 1939. He specified that It be fitted with the engine from his current Wraith chassis WXA 1 and additionally ordered the transfer of the radio and clock to his new car. The engine is closely related to the Bentley MK V unit along with the rest of the cars running gear and was frequently fitted with new developments that Sidgreaves tested personally during the period he had the car. The car was truly an experimental car and the way that things were ordered by the heads or managers of each department on the chassis cards suggest he was not the easiest person to please. The Park Ward special body fitted has no wooden frame. It has a steel base attached to the chassis and then an all alloy body fitted. Sidgreaves had worked previously as export manager with Napier prior to joining Rolls Royce and eventually became Managing Director of Rolls Royce for a 17 year period managing the company prior, throughout and post WW2. He used FLW 7 as his own car up until 1945. He was one not to be crossed and was a formidable businessman who purchased the assets of W.O. Bentley for Rolls Royce from under the noses of Napier. He had the foresight to join forces with Sir Robert Mclean of Vickers to manufacture the Spitfire. Sidgreaves was credited by `The Times' newspaper with "doing more than any other man to deliver the tools with which the RAF won the Battle of Britain." The next custodian, in 1946, was Baron Ernest Hives Chairman of Rolls Royce, a very significant figure in the history of Rolls Royce. After becoming a chief test driver in 1908, he led the Rolls Royce team in the Austrian Alpine Trial in 1913. During the First World War the company designed its first aero-engine and Hives developed it successfully, by 1916 he was Head of the Experimental Department. Other notable engines were later developed under Hives’ lead, including the Buzzard, R Series and the Merlin. In 1936 he became the general works manager of the factory and a year later was elected to the board. In 1937, thinking war would soon be inevitable, he prepared the firm for a massive production increase in Merlin engines by splitting facilities between engineering and production. As the Merlin powered Hurricanes and Spitfires, this was a decision of vital strategic significance when war did come. It was thanks to Hives that a total of a hundred and sixty thousand Merlins were produced by 1945. I n 1941 Hives quickly decided ‘to go all out for the gas turbine, ensuring the company’s leading role in developing jet engines for civil and military aviation. Vice Chief of Air Staff Sir Wilfrid Freeman, one of the masterminds behind the dramatic advances in British aircraft production before and during World War 2, paid tribute to Hives's dedication in a letter to his wife: “That man Hives is the best man I have ever come across for many a year. God knows where the RAF would have been without him. He cares for nothing except the defeat of Germany and he does all his work to that end, living a life of unending labour.” Hives became managing director in 1946 and chairman of Rolls-Royce from 1950 till 1957. He was made a Companion of Honour in 1943 and on 7 July 1950 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Hives, of Duffield in the County of Derby. The next owner was Captain Eric Smith, Chairman Rolls Royce, whose daughter Fortune was awarded the title “Her Grace the Dowager Duchess of Grafton” by HM the Queen in 2011. The final Rolls Royce director to own the car was A G Elliot up until 1951. Elliott joined Rolls Royce from Napier and became chief engineer for the aero engine division whilst being the personnel assistant to Sir Henry Royce and thereafter the joint Managing Director of Rolls Royce along with Baron Ernest Hives and then Executive Vice Chairman. In 1951 the car was then purchased by Sir Frederick Arthur Montague “Boy” Browning whose address was given as Buckingham Palace, London SW1. Browning owned the car up until 1954. During this period he was controller and treasurer to HRH Princess Elizabeth and then after their marriage became treasurer to the office of Prince Phillip after being recommended by Louis Mountbatten. He was the husband of the novelist Daphne du Maurier. At the end of WW2 Browning negotiated with and accepted the surrender of the Japanese whilst his then superior Dwight Eisenhower signed the official documents in front of the worlds media. During the hostilities he was promoted to Lt General and was instrumental in starting the Airborne corps or as we know it now, the parachute regiment, from whom spawned during that period the SAS. He was named “Boy” Browning due to his boyish looks and many books have been written on his life. HM Queen Elizabeth and the Prince Phillip would travel to Menabilly, Browning and du Maurier’s country home, along with Prince Charles and Princess Anne in the fifties and the Duke would go sailing with "Boy". It is probable that they used the Wraith at this time. The car then passed to Sir Brian Warren of Chester Square, London W1, until 1961. Another fascinating man who looked after Sir Winston Churchill’s health whilst in Downing Street and then became the personal physician to Prime Minister Ted Heath. The next owner was Dame Josephine Barnes of Chester Square, London W1, until 1963. She became the first woman President of the British Medical Association. It was then owned by Mr L Scull of Nottingham until 1974 before being bought by the late Professor Ken Britten. Amongst his many important personal engineering achievements, Britten invented the heated windscreen glass and produced gyroscopes for the first ballistic missiles for the U.S.A. Following the death of professor Britten FLW 7 was purchased by S Willkie. Ken Britten had gone through the running gear and chassis so it was a relatively simple task to drop the sump and lift the head and to see that the engine was beautifully done. The radiator was renewed, the chrome redone and the body stripped and repainted in solid maroon colour. The interior was too far gone so everything was virtually remade but fortunately the wood was in remarkably good condition, so was repolished. The Perspex sunroof was also renewed. Now “fully sorted” the Wraith drives superbly. http://www.historic-competitionservices.eu/nl/rolls-royce-wraith-park-ward

    Last update: 6 Days Old
    • Year: 1939
    For sale
  • Bentley Mk V

    €195,000(£172,146)

    Chassis Number: B34AW Engine Number: K5BF Registration Number: FYL 811 Highlights: • The rarest of all Bentleys, 1 of 7 Mark Vs in existence • B34AW is the last surviving Bentley chassis to leave the Derby works • First registered to renowned dealer Jack Barclay (as 'JB 1') and evaluated by him over a two-year period before being returned to the factory. • Fitted with Park Ward coachwork and later restored by Andrew Wood (now of P&A Wood) whilst he was an apprentice at the Rolls Royce Hythe Road service department. • Correct type engine from Woolf Barnato's sister Bentley chassis B-16-AW • “[the Mark V] a car, now only emerging from the experimental stage, which those fortunate mortals who have tried it proclaim to be the finest all-rounder ever built” Motor Sport Magazine February 1941 The Mark V is the rarest of all Bentleys. Rolls Royce planned to produce thirty-five experimental Bentley MK V chassis starting from B-2-AW through to B-70-AW using even numbers only. Seventeen were actually completed into running chassis due to the outbreak of the Second World War. Ten of these are recorded as being destroyed during the war and seven genuine MK V’s remain today. One of those is owned by Bentley Motors and included within their seven car “Lineage Collection” to indicate its importance to the development of Bentley cars. The 4 ¼ Litre Derby Bentley – advertised as the ‘Silent Sports Car’ – was refined, reliable and loved by owners, among them land speed record holder Sir Malcolm Campbell. But, by the late 1930s it had become obvious that its chassis design was becoming dated. Competitors with newer designs were crowding in and sales were in decline. The Bentley Mark V was the company’s answer – but its time was short-lived, as the outbreak of WWII halted all car production until 1946. Following the war the first car to emerge from the Crewe works was the highly successful Bentley Mark VI. This was effectively the fully-developed form of the Mark V, including all the components and engineering revisions originally planned for its predecessor. The Mark V was powered by an OHV crossflow 4257cc six-cylinder engine, similar in concept to that of the 4 ¼ Litre Bentley but substantially revised. A new and robust cruciform chassis featured deep side members, making it stiffer to the benefit of both refinement and handling. Brakes were servo driven and the four-speed overdrive gearbox now featured synchromesh on 2nd, 3rd and 4th gears. But the biggest change was the adoption of independent front suspension with coil springs and wishbones. The first Mark V prototypes were warmly received by the board of directors and a series of Mark V Bentleys were prepared for long-distance testing in continental Europe during 1938. The company also commissioned an aerodynamic version called the Corniche; it was designed by Georges Paulin, creator of the influential Embiricos Bentley, and bodied by Carosserie Vanvooren in France. Unfortunately this ‘missing link’ between pre-war Embiricos and postwar Continental was badly damaged in a crash on 7th August 1939 in France; the chassis was returned to Derby while the entire body was removed and repaired at a local coachworks. The repaired body was later waiting on the dockside at Dieppe when it was caught in a bombing raid and completely destroyed. The Rolls-Royce Heritage Trust is currently recreating a Bentley Corniche. Another one-off prototype was an eight-cylinder version of the Mark V, nicknamed the ‘Scalded Cat’ due to its electrifying performance. According to automotive historian Ken Lea, the Bentley Mark V was ‘probably the most thoroughly developed and tested car the company had seen.’ It was signed off for production in time for its planned debut at the 1939 Olympia Motor Show, where it would have been displayed with bodywork by a number of independent coachbuilders. Following the outbreak of war in September 1939 both production and the motor show were cancelled. The Mark V was the first Bentley to employ independent front suspension, a feature which made a significant difference to its handling. The chosen wishbone / coil spring system was attached to a stiffer, stronger version of the outgoing 4.25 litre chassis that incorporated notably deeper side rails. The advanced engine was closer in concept to the torquey Wraith unit and improvements made included higher compression pistons; modified camshafts; reworked inlet and exhaust manifolds; and twin SU carburettors. Other refinements included synchromesh on second gear as well as the upper ratios and a divided propeller shaft. B-34-AW is the last Derby Bentley made, being the last chassis to leave the Derby works and, as will be seen, subsequently became of considerable historical importance. Indeed, bearing in mind the post-war rationalisation of the Rolls-Royce / Bentley ranges, it is reasonable to regard this as the last of the company's truly handmade cars, the lineage of which dated back to 1908. Chassis B-34-AW was intended to debut at the 1939/1940 New York World Fair but, owing to the risks involved in shipping at that time, was instead offered to Jack Barclay in June 1940 as a Park Ward Sports Saloon, and duly registered `JB 1'. It is important to understand that all the Mark Vs were effectively experimental cars, and the deal was that Barclay would evaluate B-34-AW over a two year period and provide Rolls-Royce with regular updates, which he did. With the original agreement satisfied, the Rolls was then registered as `FYL 811' and sold to Mr P G Hingley of Worcestershire - images in the book `A Pride of Bentleys' by John Adams and Ray Roberts show the car was liveried in Yellow over Black around this period. Following six further keepers, it was acquired by Andrew Wood, now of the renowned marque specialists P & A Wood of Essex. At the time of his purchase, Wood was an apprentice at Rolls-Royce's Hythe Road Works. Andrew and his brother Paul restored the car under the watchful eye of the Hythe Road foreman, installing the latest factory improvements to ensure the car was to the optimum specification. This, their first Bentley restoration, was recently celebrated when the car was invited to, and displayed at, the opening of P & A Wood's new Rolls-Royce showroom. Following a much more recent restoration of its lightweight body which consists of a steel frame with alloy wings, boot lid, bonnet and doors, FYL 811 is now resplendent in its original colour of Corniche Maroon and is complemented by Pale Grey hide upholstery and matching Grey carpets bound in leather. A very rare high performance pre-war “super saloon” capable of long distance touring or rallying.

    Last update: 6 Days Old
    • Engine size: 4.2
    For sale
  • Jaguar C-Type

    €189,000(£166,849.20)

    JAGUAR C-TYPE BY DAVID BROWN Chassis Number: 716882 Engine Number: A3994-7 Head number: LB 8353-8 Registration Number: JUN 563 When the XK120 saw the daylight in 1948, only aluminium was available to construct these gracious automobiles during the after days of WWII. It was never suspected that those fine sports cars were such a success which led to ordering tooling for the steel sheets to cope with the ever growing orders. 240 ‘alloy’ bodied 120’s were made and almost all of them found their way to some sort of racing circuit due it’s very light bodywork and nimble character. Jaguar reacted accordingly and decided to develop a specially made track-built version of these lightweight 120’s: The C-type. These C-types set the course for the 7 overall wins at Le Mans for Jaguar when in 1951 they won Le Mans for the first time and did it again in 1953 with their updated version. D-types continued this winning-streak and the rest is well-known history. The car we present you is a recreation of one of Jaguars most famous cars. It has been made by World renowned C-type expert David Brown in New Zealand to the highest detail you can think off. The car is constructed to the original drawings provided by friend, and well-known classic car dealer, Ian Cummings in Sydney, these being based on an original C-type located in his shop. David Brown constructed this C-type to very high standards and using as much original parts as possible. The car is constructed on a tubular frame where a full aluminium coach built bodywork was expertly crafted. A 1953 Jaguar Mark VII donated its basic parts and 3.4 litre engine block for this car. (although completely rebuilt to C Type spec) With a 83mm bore and 106mm stroke, the specifications are exactly the same to the original C-type. A Jaguar MKII provided the head fitted on this bespoke machine which gives you the correct bigger valve diameters to give that extra bit of ‘oomph’ to the already powerful lump. The original C-type gave you 203BHP which was easily achieved by this setup. Double overhead cams, original double twin “Sand Cast” H8 cast SU carburettors, four-wheel original type drum brakes and detailed independent front suspension proving it very very close to the original example in their workshop. The gearbox is the famous Jaguar four-speed Moss box as fitted to all C-types, all the instruments are correct as are the Brooklands type windscreens and even the cold air intake box for the carburettors. Every stitch, every rivet and every bolt were fitted with the C-type in mind. Even the wiring looms are made out of braded cotton wire and with wonderful detail. What more can we say, the attention to detail is absolutely stunning. It is believed that the few existing “David Brown C-types” are so good that distinguishing them from the originals is very tricky even for Jaguar specialists. These are renowned for being the best of the best. Therefore it is more than logical that these “Post production” C-types as standard FIA recreations, are FIA applicable and are being raced among their full blood brothers in major events around the World. This car comes with 1953 V5C British registration papers, original “JUN 563” number plate and is therefore eligible to race in the FIA vintage series. The current owner bought the car from ‘The old Racing Car Company’ in the UK who acquired it directly from David Brown as his UK demo vehicle. If you like C-types and don’t want to spend multi millions (literally) on your dream car, this example will be perfect for you. Made to the highest standards and driving like a thoroughbred sports car, although is handles easily in normal traffic as well, this car is the pinnacle of early 50’s motorsport. It is stunning in every aspect. http://www.stuff.co.nz/southland-times/business/2948893/Dave-Brown-model-just-like-the-original http://www.nzherald.co.nz/motoring/news/article.cfm?c_id=9&objectid=10772798 http://www.historic-competitionservices.eu/nl/jaguar-c-type-by-david-brown

    Last update: 6 Days Old
    • Year: 1953
    • Engine size: 3.4
    For sale