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Ferrari 250GT Europa Coupé at RM’s Phoenix sale

An alloy-bodied Ferrari 250GT Boano will go on sale at RM Auctions’ 15-16 January Arizona sale


‘How do you know when it’s done?’ It is a question routinely asked of great artists, and one that we’d have been interested to put to those at Carrozzeria Boano who worked on this Ferrari 250GT Europa Coupé – one of nine pre-production 250GT Boanos and one of only 14 alloy-bodied cars.

Chassis 0447GT left Ferrari in October of 1955 and was intended to wear coachwork by Pinin Farina, but Battista, Sergio and co announced that they were much too busy to dress the car, so it was sent to Boano instead.

There, the team began work on a body penned by Pinin Farina, making small changes as they went. (Designers and builders of the period were not known for their deference.) In the grand scheme of things, these tweaks were pretty inconsequential, but they were noticeable – particularly the upswept beltline break behind the doors. The meddling didn’t end there, however: remarkably, 0447GT was back at Boano almost immediately after it was ‘finished’, and more alterations were made.

There was a new, unbroken waistline from the front to the rear fenders; the front fenders were tapered to end at the headlight rims; the turn signals on the B-pillars were eliminated. The first take is usually the best, but here, for once, the fiddling produced something special.

‘How do you know when it’s done?’ is a question routinely asked of market watchers, too, particularly when things heat up. In 2005, an alloy 250GT Boano made $410,000 – a sum described then by Hemmings as ‘stunning’; in 2011, 0447GT was sold at auction for $660,000; the going rate for a top-quality steel 250GT Boano is now pushing a million dollars; and the pre-sale estimate on 0447GT this time is a vast $1,750,000-2,250,000. Demand for good Ferrari road cars shows no sign of abating, and 0477GT, which was once part of the Blackhawk Collection, is a very good car indeed. Unique, well maintained by knowledgeable owners and powered by the fabulous 3.0-litre Colombo V12, it ticks a whole lot of boxes.

The answer to that question, then, as it relates to the Ferrari market: when a car has more than quadrupled in value in less than ten years and still looks an attractive long-term prospect, it’s not done yet. Not by a long shot.

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